Recent comments

  • ChrisMallory's picture
    ChrisMallory 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Christopher Lempa
    Those aren't secret codes. They are what any educated person, even a nonbeliever in times past, would recognize as the way verses are referenced in the Bible.
  • Guest's picture
    pcdls.ronin (not verified) 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Christopher Lempa
    You never know about the intentions of others. Freedom dictates two paths: trust and distrust. Do you trust the intentions of Mr. Hantz or do you not? Do your research and determine, by his past actions, whether to trust him. This trust, ultimately, falls to you. I truly hope that your trust is well placed. Good Luck.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 years 47 weeks ago
    How to End the State
    Web link Mike Powers
    Some years back, Alex, I seceded from the union. Now of course I recognize I live in occupied territory. But I would live in occupied territory if I lived in, say Costa Rica or France or Iran. That's because I have no control over others, thus I have to side-step their fear (your assessment, which is very astute and accurate) which gives rise to their need for state. So I protect myself from two types of criminal behavior: government and non-government. The later is by far the easiest -- generally locking the door and the bike and avoiding certain areas at unsafe times will do the trick. Government criminals are more pernicious. They bank on me being among the "majority" (dwindling, I think, but not fast enough) who believe "we" should all pledge allegiance to flags and chant slogans and sing national anthems. And vote. Last time I voted was 1964. For Barry Goldwater. It took several years after that before I seceded and became a sovereign state. I still have to obey laws. The laws that govern me, however, can be inscribed upon two tablets of stone. No law libraries or state dignitaries dressed in long black robes making decisions "for my own good". My President is responsible for the rotation of the earth on its axis. I'll vote for The Incumbent. Samarami
  • Mike Powers's picture
    Mike Powers 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    I agree with your sentiment regarding the term "capitalism." It is a loaded word with many negative connotations. "Free market" is better, but it, too, has some baggage, and is also used derisively by anti-free market statists. Perhaps "open markets" would be a better term? How can anyone be against open markets? Michael Cloud said that "words are weapons; words are tools." We must choose wisely the words that define our beliefs. Mike Powers
  • DennisLeeWilson's picture
    DennisLeeWilson 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    This is an excellent supplement to an article I wrote 2009-07-05 regarding the pros and cons of government marriage permits: "Do Marriage Licenses Automatically Make You a Slave to Government?" http://tinyurl.com/yhdct42
  • Robert Fredericks's picture
    Robert Fredericks 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    Abolitionist, I think you're missing the point. What about the article implies that STR has deteriorated into a statist tool, as you say?
  • wkmac's picture
    wkmac 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    As I grow in freedom and liberty, I've come more and more to avoid the use of capitialism in describing my economic beliefs and more and more using the term, Free Market. Just because I as a free individual might use elements of capitialism in my economic acts of free market with another individual doesn't mean that others are bound to those same terms and conditions because I or others believe they are superior. To impose on others such demands are an act of statism IMO and therefore violate the very idea and ideals of a free market. A free market means you are free to try what you think might work and if you can find others who agree without the use of force or fraud, you again are free to implement those ideas. The term "free market" IMO is for the moment the best possible term as I see it because in word alone it promotes the spirit of true anarchíā but I'm not so bold to think the evolution of freedom in descriptive name will stop there for all time! jmo Thanks for your efforts and wisdom Sheldon! signed A Padawan Learner LOL!
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    Abolitionist, I agree that Woo is despicable, but STR is just linking to a mostly negative review of Yoo's book as a news item. I don't think the fact that STR is linking to this review can in any way be taken as some sort of endorsement of Yoo.
  • Guest's picture
    Abolitionist (not verified) 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    What a tendentious, vile, pile of steaming, festering diarrhea from a sick dog. This is no doubt how lawyers acquired their stellar reputation for integrity - by desperately scraping for some pathetic vestige of a defense for each other's conduct, no matter how despicable, reprehensible, and criminal that conduct might be. At the very least, what John Yoo deserves is to experience (in depth) virtually every example of the inhuman and inhumane treatment that he has enabled or advocated to be inflicted on unindicted political prisoners (I will except sexual mutilation of his children on non-collectivist, individual guilt grounds). What kind of statist tool has STR deteriorated into when an article like this is featured? -A
  • Guest's picture
    Abolitionist (not verified) 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    What a tendentious, steaming, festering pool of rancid diarrhea from a sick dog. This is no doubt how lawyers acquired their stellar reputation - by desperately attempting to concoct some duplicitous fig leaf of a defense for each other no matter how heinous their crimes. -A
  • ALLEN090's picture
    ALLEN090 8 years 47 weeks ago Page Robert L. Johnson
    Robert, You hit the bulls eye.
  • Evan's picture
    Evan 8 years 47 weeks ago
    Copying Is Not Theft
    Web link Robert Fredericks
    Yay! Copying is not theft Stealing a thing leaves one less left Copying it makes one thing more That's what copying's for Copying is not theft If I copy yours you have it too One for me and one for you That's what copies can do If I steal your bicycle You have to take the bus But if I just copy it There's one for each of us Making more of a thing That is what we call copying Sharing ideas with everyone That's why copying is fun!
  • JoshuaPettigrew's picture
    JoshuaPettigrew 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    I guess no one can be right all the time.
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    If those who try to trick idiots into valuing religious / advantages for their parochial group would step back and do a cost / benefit evaluation of the conflict of discrimination, it would be readily apparent that ALL parties are on a path to non-survival. When push comes to shove, people value ability to economically survive over ideological conflicts. Israel should restore the "rule of law": http://www.strike-the-root.com/51/ross/ross3.html Once this is done, Israel would occupy the factual / moral high ground. They can achieve their security and expand their influence by honest trade and voluntary consent of their neighbors. Clearly Israels neighbors have zero clue regarding civil society, economics and prosperity. Israel can become a regional leader, but NEVER a ruler.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 47 weeks ago
    In North Vietnam
    Web link Don Stacy
    Chomsky on STR again in less than a week! What bit of insight about liberty the STR guest editor thought we'd all glean from America's "best known anarchist" from forty years ago is unclear. Perhaps they'd care to elaborate?
  • Guest's picture
    GAEsworthy (not verified) 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    Please pay attention. Before you posted this, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express all announced that not only were they making substantial corporate donations to the rescue and aid efforts, but also were waiving their transaction interchange fees for donations to most major charitable organization. For example: http://corporate.visa.com/media-center/press-releases/press976.jsp "Credit Nazis" indeed, you offensive oaf.
  • DennisLeeWilson's picture
    DennisLeeWilson 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    This article by Brad Spangler has good, clear explanations, is very succinct and well presented!
  • Guest's picture
    PasserBy (not verified) 8 years 47 weeks ago Page Douglas Herman
    Well, Albergine, if you had bothered to actually read the linked article before making your offensive comments about us Brits, you might have noticed that all the references in it are to identified Americans who are feeling depressed and suicidal after watching Avatar.
  • Guest's picture
    Samuel (not verified) 8 years 47 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    Damn commies. I really hope Google will pull out of China to make a statement. Eventually this will the best for everyone. In a few years Google will return. Cheers, Samuel. online casino  
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    This part of the article says it all: "“Had I recorded an officer saving someone’s life, I almost guarantee you that they wouldn’t have come up to me and say, ‘Hey, you just recorded me saving that person’s life. You’re under arrest.’ ’’"
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    I remember reading about the rise of French Hip Hop. It was the unintended consequence of a French law that required radio stations to play a certain percentage of French language music. The strange result is that a traditional Italian folk song would not count as part of this percentage but Oxmo Puccino rapping in French would. For every law there are unintended consequences.
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    Yes, but there are more basic reasons. Accurate information is required to correctly choose. Our predators need: a) Accurate information to identify, manipulate their prey b) Disoriented by subverted media and education prey, incapable of correctly choosing. Predators want to be able to correctly choose and have prey incapable of defending themselves (thinking) http://www.strike-the-root.com/51/ross/ross2.html Darwin PROVED: Survival EQUALS adaptation to environment EQUALS ability to CHOOSE correctly EQUALS freedom: http://www.strike-the-root.com/62/ross/ross1.html
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    Its all about pretexts for advocates. Those they claim the motive (unprovable) is to help never seem to be "helped", only made more dependent and, to resolve this, the "advocates" claim more resources required. This is also the script according to Machiavelli (strategically denied bible of arbitrary power – politics): Machiavelli Paraphrased: “Arbitrary power can get away with ANYTHING, so long as it appears “necessary” to intellectually crippled populations (falsely framed arguments, based on lies for input facts, flogged by corrupt experts, shilling and prostituting their academic degrees for power, blind trust of populace, a social disease and mental illness I call “expertitus”) . In essence, all such arguments are a house of cards, false assumptions built upon false assumptions, the false equating of speculation to REALITY.” The is the exact same algorithm used to rationalize the initiation of aggression against Iraq, a war crime. The same false “argument” is being carefully constricted against Iran. Embargo, the first step of war, initiated. With the discrediting of socialism, all pretexts regarding slavery of the productive to “help the unfortunate” (who adapt to dependency, collapsing civilization) have been replaced by pretexts “to avoid terror” such as necessity for preemptive justice, war or “save the environment” (AGW fraud, etc). In these false arguments, the “bad guys” always have something to steal. The “good guys” are those who intend to profit by the thievery.
  • redgar's picture
    redgar 8 years 48 weeks ago Page Ken Bank
    I agree with much of your post! All this post is rather old I wanted to say that most NJLP activists would completely agree with you. The Ron Paul campaign has attracted many right wing, big government types to the so called "freedom movement". Fortunately many of them are young and can learn what freedom is really about. Also see http://njlp.org/news/partynews/latestnews/802-lonegan-shows-love-for-big...
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    One of the interesting things about this article is that it provides a good example of how unresponsive government can be to the wishes of its subjects. This is an article written in a mainstream publication and there were 266 comments. I perused the comments and saw that nearly everyone found this practice by the police to be reprehensible, and yet they keep doing it anyway.
  • Guest's picture
    SpykerSpeed (not verified) 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    KenK, Long is actually calling Chomsky out. Read the article, you'll probably agree with it. Here's the money quote: "If the state really is intervening massively and systematically on behalf of the “potentate” and against the “starving subject” – as Chomsky must admit that it is, since his research explicitly demonstrates just this – why on earth would he expect that power imbalance to remain unchanged once that intervention ceases?"
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    Disagree. Its the intelligent versus idiots (left or right) falsely equating subverted opinions with reality. Objective thinkers, with courage must prevail, or we stay on the path to social / economic collapse and anarchy by "corrupt judicial discretion" (rule of man, destroyer of civilizations): http://www.strike-the-root.com/51/ross/ross2.html
  • albergine's picture
    albergine 8 years 48 weeks ago Page Douglas Herman
    Well the brit's are mostly a depressive bunch and very easily confused so would imagine that a soft number of them would fall into desperation after leaving the sanctuary of illusion that's pandora, could also be that the linked to article is from a comic written by juveniles or that kid's suffering from withdrawal just wanted to get home and blast away on their vid game, have they all fallen into a well of tears over the current Haitian disaster i wonder. All they get is candy coated, there lives are candy coated, that's why they'd steer clear of a hard hitting smack in the face film with it's feet sunk firmly in fact in favour of fuzzy narnia fiction that look's for no commitment other than to buy the stuffed teddy, I become very irritated when mature people are offered and take sweet flavour to suck on to disguise any bitterness that may awake their better sense.
  • Fraxdablue's picture
    Fraxdablue 8 years 48 weeks ago Page Douglas Herman
    "Happy feely jig with big smiles after seeing the likes of Avatar" ??? Read this article from the UK where viewers are feeling depressed and suicidal after seeing the film. Maybe coming to terms with what we have done to our planet? I think the candy coated vitamin pill is the only way to get the message to where it needs to be heard. Reminds me of the Idaho logging communities who attempted to get the school system to ban Dr. Seuss's Lorax Tree books from classes because their 6 years olds were coming home in tears and asking Daddy why he was cutting down all the trees. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1242409/The-Avatar-effect-Movie-...
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 48 weeks ago
    Do you like STR 2.0?
    Poll strike
    I like the new version, but I haven't discovered a way to easily view all of the comments rather than just the most recent ones without going back and looking at each article individually.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    This is a great example of Thoreau's quote about hacking at the branches of evil rather than the root. Just a bunch of people with opinions about HOW the govt should handle airport security - and not even a mention of WHETHER the govt should be handling it at all.
  • wkmac's picture
    wkmac 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    Great article Anthony. Thanks again for getting out front on this issue (ie your LRC comment on Food Inc.). For others interested who've not seen and want more background, I recommend the movies "The World According To Monsanto" and "Food Inc" and view in that order because IMO it builds on itself. Both movies are available on the internet with "TWATM" being available on Google video and "Food Inc" available at Top Documentary Films website. Food Inc. may be on Google too but I've not looked. Having seen Food Inc. at the movie theater, it was interesting afterwards as people gathered to talk in the parking lot and it gave a wonderful opportunity to cause people to think that we have the corporate monsters not because of the "free market" but we have them because we don't have a true "free market." This also ties in well with many points made in the other article today on STR "Left & Right Against the Empire." When I listened and agreed with many on corporate abuse, they in turn listened and considered my points about how a true free market would offer a true people driven roadblock to such corporate hegemony. Even thought this was before the Obama election and many were planning on voting that way (I was unable to convince them of alternatives ie not voting) many did admit they weren't sure how well voting Obama would work out in the end. I'd love to talk with them now!
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    Ken, I've listened to several interviews that Scott Horton has done with Glen Greenwald. While he's not a libertarian, he is consistently anti-war and I think we would probably agree that war is one of the worst of all govt programs. Greenwald is very knowledgeable and does a good job of fact-checking and exposing lies told by the administration. He is very good at explaining the legal arguments and their flaws. Although he was hopeful Obama would be better than Bush, I think he's been very good at admitting that Obama is heading down the same path as Bush at least when it comes to war and civil liberties and contempt for constitutional protections.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    Did Greenwald write stuff like this when Bush was in office? Just askin'. LRC features this guy a lot as some kind of libertarian Democrat but why it does just baffles me.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    Noam Chomsky is no anarchist, "best known" or otherwise. He is a statist through and through. Read his stuff and this becomes readily apparent. Dr. Long is full of shit. Who Is Chomsky?
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 8 years 48 weeks ago
    Only Cowards Vote
    Page Per Bylund
    Here again, my two cents worth is that on those rare occasions that we can vote to unambiguously END or REDUCE tyranny, the "voting strengthens the statist system" meme is simply wrong. I'd again use the example of voting to free the slaves: that one's obvious, I would think, but ANYTHING that truly ends or reduces tyranny is worthwhile. Waiting for "perfection" is a good way to get nowhere. You can wait your entire life (and probably will -- most people who have ever lived, did) for real freedom, and refusing to support at least a significant INCREASE in freedom is silly, IMO. Voting in any OTHER circumstance -- then I agree with you. On the other hand, your or my individual vote means almost nothing, statistically, so it's not likely to matter either way in ANY voting situation.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 8 years 48 weeks ago
    The Year Ahead: 2010
    Page Glen Allport
    I've read some of his stuff, and indeed the idea that Americans will NOT do as well with a collapse as the Russians did is something I first saw in an interview with Orlov. Like many unsettling predictions, its an obvious point but we don't tend to think in that direction, meaning that most of us expect "normal" life in the US to continue, with minor changes over time and short ups and downs from the business cycle. Something much more severe is coming to a head, though, and this fact has begun to filter into more and more people's awareness. The first week or two of this year has already seen a large number of very scary predictions and commentary. Two examples: Willem Buiter [former Bank of England policymaker] warns of massive dollar collapse http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/4125947/Willem-Buiter-warns... and Dr. Edwin Vieira, Jr. on the Failure of the Public Sector, the Coming Military Crackdown and What Can Be Done to Stop It http://www.thedailybell.com/724/Edwin-Vieira-the-Coming-Military-Crackdo... As for planning: the first thing is to understand the underlying forces and dynamics in play, and then apply that understanding to your own personal situation, including your resources, weaknesses, preferences, and so on. Fiat currency always dies; the entire world is using fiat currency today -- and the end-game for all of those currencies is very near. The dollar is now worth so little compared to its historic "1/20 oz of gold" that each dollar now has about the purchasing power of a PENNY (or two) in my grandfather's day. Combine that with mega-trillion dollar deficits, $100 trillion in unfunded liabilities, a dismantled manufacturing infrastructure and a largely centrally-controlled market for most things, and -- well, all the rest; you know the story as well as I do -- and SOMETHING big is coming. Be ready for that. How? Move overseas, maybe. Put in a large garden, maybe. Stock up on staples and goods for bartering. My personal situation is not the same as yours, and I am reluctant to suggest anyone else do what I think is right -- it might NOT be right, even for me, not to mention for you. But if you will look the future in the eye and see what today's information is telling you about tomorrow, you'll know what to do. It won't be easy, or cheap, or pleasant, so you'll want to not see it. Try to get past that and see things clearly -- that's the best advice I think I can give anyone.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 8 years 48 weeks ago
    The Year Ahead: 2010
    Page Glen Allport
    Thanks, golefevre (nice handle, btw). The possibility that the coming collapse and various other disasters will enlighten people about the dangers of coercive government and move them to better understand the importance of love and freedom in their lives is, to my mind, the ONLY positive we might see from the global fiat-currency meltdown and its attendant evils. I don't think our odds are good for a positive outcome, but the odds aren't zero, either.
  • Mike Powers's picture
    Mike Powers 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Body cavity searches can't be far off the horizon.
  • albergine's picture
    albergine 8 years 48 weeks ago Page Douglas Herman
    i see the point but on reading numerous reviews fail to get what the big deal is about this pic, no i haven't seen it but have seen bucket loads of films from either the big timers or small fry that make their point in a much more obvious manner, those i have in mind are set in the 'now' not in some fictional nowhere, are much more hard hitting and give no illusion as to there meaning, after the view (unless comatose) the watcher will know the sickness that the truth makes them feel rather than do a happy feely jig with big smiles after seeing the likes of Av*tar.
  • mike's picture
    mike 8 years 48 weeks ago Page Scarmig
    How does the government keep track of someone w/o a SSN for tax purposes? I was born in the US, and have a valid US passport, but have lived my entire life in Canada and never got a SSN. I'm supposed to file taxes every year for the rest of my life! But I don't know if i'm even on record, so i don't want to start unnecessarily.. Any ideas?
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Courts to FCC “You Don’t Have Power to Enforce Net Neutrality” Rule Of Law “Oh, yes, they do” Communications carriers, as corporate creations of law are subject to the “rule of law” (ALL are treated equally, in terms of rights and responsibility, by law): http://www.strike-the-root.com/51/ross/ross3.html This does not prevent communications carriers from lawfully using “bandwidth throttling” to penalize those who have not paid for their fair share of bandwidth with a more premium service. Throttling is absolutely necessary for fair allocation of service bandwidth between users at any particular service level. Premium service fees are absolutely necessary for providers to afford the capital / operational expense of meeting increasing customer needs (service improvement). You get what you pay for in a free market. Surely whatever residual capitalist sensibility still exists in the US gets this?
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 48 weeks ago Page Douglas Herman
    Its just a matter of presenting the truth to the sheeple in a form they may get. Luckily, Hollywood still has ideological faction wars and has not fully succumbed to the "dark side". Our tyrants are toast if MSM ever figures out a way to make truth profitable. Currently, lies sell. Here's how and why: http://www.strike-the-root.com/51/ross/ross2.html
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Yeah, but only because of a legal technicality related to this particular medical marijuana case.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Yep. In terms of financial damage to the empire it's a hugely successful strategy. Eric Margolis is one of my favorite commentators on foreign policy. I've listened to several of his interviews with Scott Horton at antiwar.com.
  • White Refugee's picture
    White Refugee 8 years 48 weeks ago
    The Year Ahead: 2010
    Page Glen Allport
    Glen, I was just curious if you had read Dmitry Orlov's post: Fits in nicely with yours, for what to expect, and a few ideas on planning. Surviving Peak Oil & Economic Collapse: Post-Soviet Lessons for a Post-American Century, by Dmitry Orlov
  • rickdoogie's picture
    rickdoogie 8 years 48 weeks ago
    Only Cowards Vote
    Page Per Bylund
    Voting may be able to make a statist system a little less oppressive for a while. But the very act of voting helps strengthen the statist system. Small picture / Big picture.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 8 years 48 weeks ago
    The Year Ahead: 2010
    Page Glen Allport
    Good question, and I don't think I have enough information to answer. Absent government intrusions, the answer would of course be "yes" -- there are plenty of areas where the people could take care of themselves, ride out the crisis, and maintain some level of civil society. Rural areas with small farms would be obvious candidates, and states or smaller areas with mining, oil, or other commodity wealth and the infrastructure to extract and/or refine and ship the products would also be more likely than average, I'd think, to do well. But as you suggest, the government response to this government-created [whether INTENTIONALLY or not] crisis is unknown. LOTS of things -- both historic examples and present day news and rumor -- suggest some very ugly actions by the feds, with skyrocketing taxes being among the lesser evils we might be subjected to. So far, the government response has largely been to steal breath-taking amounts of money from the citizens and hand it to bankers and other connected special interests. Actually reversing the damage and starting to solve the problem is NOT on the agenda. What will happen? What are the odds for various scenarios? Again, I don't have enough information to say anything definite. Personally, I expect large, crowded metro areas to be especially dangerous, but even THAT depends on the particulars of what happens. So good luck to us all, and here's hoping that the healthier, traditional American qualities -- self-reliance, fairness, respect for others (i.e., for their freedom), honesty, willingness to do real work, ingenuity, charity where appropriate, and so on -- carry the day and in the end, are strengthened. Plenty of forces are working for the extinction of such qualities, and I really think that too much is hidden from us right now (anybody think the dozens of alphabet agencies are being open and honest with us about their plans?) to even guess how things will work out.
  • Guest's picture
    SpykerSpeed (not verified) 8 years 48 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    lol, "Liberty County Jail".
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 8 years 48 weeks ago Page Douglas Herman
    Terrific column, Douglas. I especially enjoyed your "news coverage" comments -- right on the mark. I hadn't noticed it while watching the film, but now it's obvious that indeed Cameron missed an opportunity there. (Perhaps on purpose; filmmakers have to contend with running-time and other constraints). In any case I'd have enjoyed seeing CNN and FOX newsies reporting the Pandoran War to the folks back home. Avatar is doing more than twice as much business overseas as it is in the US, although even here it's setting records. I think you are right that a bigger percentage of the public in other nations sees Avatar as an only slightly-disguised look at the U.S. empire. Avatar receipts as posted at http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=avatar.htm, as of 1/10/2010: Domestic: $430,846,514 -- 32.1% + Foreign: $910,847,633 -- 67.9% = Worldwide: $1,341,694,147 This is after only 24 days, and the movie is STILL #1 in theaters world-wide by a solid margin.