Recent comments

  • Steve's picture
    Steve 8 years 32 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    If the Seasteading Institute were working off the coast of New Hampshire instead of California, they'd get a lot of synergy with the Free State Project.
  • Puck's picture
    Puck 8 years 32 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    My respect for Robert Higgs increased--it was already very high--as I listened to this interview. I've been guilty of economic apocalypticism myself. While not papering over how bad things are and could become, Higgs brings a good measure of perspective, and humility, to his analysis of the current state of the economy. This is definitely worth a listen.
  • zrated's picture
    zrated 8 years 33 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    this must be the movement's most tiresome fad.
  • Guest's picture
    Scott Friday (not verified) 8 years 33 weeks ago
    Economics for Dummies
    Page Paul Hein
    Nice article! For the interested reader, Murray Rothbard has several great writings about money. The following are listed in order of how long they are, shortest to longest. All of them are really good. The last one is his great treatise on economics in general and absolutely rocks! The Case for a 100 Percent Gold Dollar http://mises.org/daily/1829 What Has Government Done to Our Money? http://mises.org/books/whathasgovernmentdone.pdf The Case Against the Fed http://mises.org/books/fed.pdf The Mystery of Banking http://mises.org/mysteryofbanking/mysteryofbanking.pdf History of Money and Banking in the United States: The Colonial Era to World War II http://mises.org/books/historyofmoney.pdf Man, Economy, and State, with Power and Market http://mises.org/rothbard/mes.asp
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 33 weeks ago
    Economics for Dummies
    Page Paul Hein
    My dictionary says that economics is a social science (sic!) dealing with the production and distribution of goods and services. That definition, however, is based upon one colossal assumption: that there is a medium of exchange! I am not an economist, either. I did take two entry-level semesters of Economics many years ago, but I'd be an idiot to think that entitled me to pontificate on the subject. I do remember how the teacher defined the subject, though, on the first day of class: the study of how a community's limited resources are allocated in light of man's unlimited appetite. So defined, Economics does not require an intermediate medium of exchange, whether it be paper scrip or precious metal. Why is currency based on gold regarded as superior? Only because everybody wants it and is therefore willing to trade anything for it. Change that fact, and suddenly gold-based currency is no longer as attractive as it used to be. What if you had all your wealth invested in gold, and then the cold fusion breakthrough occurs. Now it's cheap to turn lead into gold; we can churn out gold by the hundredweight for pennies. What happens to your wealth? Currency can be based on anything that has value to enough people: horses, wives, Matchbox cars, stones with holes in them -- anything, so long as enough people, for whatever reason, will assign value thereto. It stands to reason, therefore, that if a government says, "This note is legal tender," and the people accept the fiat, it's as much currency as if based on gold. I suspect the real difference is that proponents of gold-based currency are thinking that it's a lot easier to manipulate the money supply when the money isn't based on a tangible commodity than when it is based on gold; and that is probably true. But that doesn't mean that the former isn't valid. It just means its value isn't as secure. I've always wondered how an economy with a gold-based currency can grow when it isn't able to acquire more gold. Isn't that a recipe for inflation? or would it be deflation?
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 33 weeks ago Page Alex Schroeder
    This is a difficult thesis for me, because a good system of roads, for example, serves a defensive function that is even more fundamental than its economic function. The interstate system in America was conceived with internal military transportation in mind. The speed with which warfare is conducted in modern times would seem to demand that a good system of roads be built before it is needed, and in order to do that a government must have the means to demand the sale of land. I think the analysis in this article overlooks a distinction in the development -- one might more appropriately say devolution -- of the concept of "public good." I am only hypothesizing such a devolution; but the same sort of deterioration took place in the field of law in the 20th century. Briefly, courts began supporting abrogation of contracts when such resulted in more efficient use of resources, the idea being that a more efficient use of resources benefited everyone. This approach subordinates the value of integrity, of keeping one's word, to economics, which should be deplorable to anyone of principle. So, I am wondering if a similar corruption has occurred with the notion of "public good." Perhaps "public good" was more narrowly defined in bygone days so as to include certain presupposed limitations based on intangible values that have waned or disappeared altogether from modern consciousness. If I were to hazard a guess, I'd suggest that this loss may be due in no small part to the depersonalized view of man himself as a mere member of this group or that class rather than as an individual, glorious in his own right. Maybe when man's existence as a noble creature was a given, no one would have dreamed of interpreting "public good" in merely economic terms so as to take from one individual and give to another. In other words, maybe the problems isn't that eminent domain is wrong, but rather that those applying the principle are corrupt and so apply it in a corrupt fashion. I don't see how eminent domain can be avoided in the modern era. The trick is that it has to be applied by men of good character, and these have become hard to find.
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 33 weeks ago
    Timing Is Everything
    Page Bill Butler
    "So what can you do about it?" I spend a lot of time these days thinking about just that question. "Not much, but if someone from Goldman Sachs tries to buy something from you, charge him double." What about refusing to sell to him at all? The value of money depends on whether the Seller will respect it. Some communities have begun issuing their own local currency, which is just another form of barter. I am a big fan of barter, inasmuch as it offers a way to exchange goods in a largely clandestine fashion. If a barterer doesn't pay income tax on his transaction, he may get caught and punished; but if a hundred thousand barterers don't pay income tax on their transactions, such an outcome is much less likely. So, besides doing your part to make those ill-gotten, inflated dollars worthless, this approach denies the government revenue while at the same time taking you off the economy train that is speeding down the track toward inevitable disaster. Barter also has considerable potential for reinvigorating local community consciousness and spirit. I just can't say enough good things about it, in the current climate. Naturally, it goes without saying that life as we know it has ended. We will not be able to hold onto the conveniences and lifestyles we have become accustomed to enjoying; indeed, these have been slipping away for some time (how many families are making it on just one income?). I expect this process to accelerate. We need to stop thinking in terms of holding onto a past that is built on a crumbling foundation and build a new foundation, atop which we can build another prosperous economy -- perhaps not for ourselves, but for our children and our children's children.
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 33 weeks ago
    Valor and Discretion
    Page tzo
    Thank you for this well-written, thoughtful and educational article. The moral dilemma referred to in a few of the comments is unnecessary. Backing down and complying needn't be about a lack of courage; it can be about picking your battles, viewing your opportunity to resist as a resource and spending it where it will be most effective. Only you know which concern is paramount to you. I will comply with an oppressor's dictates if by so doing I remain at liberty to cause all sorts of other kinds of trouble. Take the long view. Bow and scrape, and then corrupt your neighbors when the oppressor has turned his attention elsewhere. :) The non-violent non-cooperators are the only real threat by the oppressed to an oppressive regime; and don't think that some of them don't know it. Let's get busy and cause as much trouble as we can, while we can! There's a vast populace out there, ignorant of their power; and we must educate them.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 33 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    This is a very good discussion about IP, but unfortunately the audio quality is poor for much of what Kinsella has to say.
  • miamizsun's picture
    miamizsun 8 years 33 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    The sad part is that legions of Keynesians will see this as a great move. Just watch CNBC for proof. I've been really disappointed that there aren't more people in congress like Dr. Paul, or who at least get it. And when the defecation hits the ventilation, everyone will look surprised, and start pointing fingers. Of course no one could have seen this coming..... ;-) Regards
  • Bill Walker's picture
    Bill Walker 8 years 33 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Sure, why have all those expensive 'reserves' taking up valuable computer memory. After all, the no-reserve policy got Zimbabwe where it is today...
  • J3rBear's picture
    J3rBear 8 years 33 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Ahoy mateys! She have a swashbuckling new captain, but the U.S.S. American Corporatocracy be running true to her same ol' course.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 33 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Good for him!
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 8 years 34 weeks ago Page Will Groves
    "Why Does the World Feel Wrong?" is one of the most powerful and important essays I've ever read. It's terrifying and edifying in equal measure. The State -- a psychopathic organization (because it is based on coercion, i.e., on criminal action) attracts and empowers psychopaths. With the State in power over every square inch of inhabitable land on this planet, Groves' observation that "the world feels wrong because psychopaths run it" is deeply, horribly true. Andrew Lobaczewski, who Groves' discusses here, has said "The only conspiracy that matters is the conspiracy of the psychopaths against the rest of us." I can't think of a better way to put it. How can we reduce the number of psychopaths in the world? By more compassionate and respectful treatment of pregnant mothers, newborns, infants, and children. How can we reduce the power of psychopaths to harm the rest of us? By reducing, and eventually eliminating, the coercion at the heart of State structures. Love and freedom, together, are the answer. Neither will work alone.
  • overthair's picture
    overthair 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Taking The Tenth
    Web link Robert Fredericks
    "A people enslaves itself, cuts its own throat, when, having a choice between being vassals and being free men, it deserts its liberties and takes on the yoke, gives consent to its own misery, or, rather, apparently welcomes it." So wrote Etienne de La Boetie in his 1552 essay, The Politics of Obedience : The Discourse of Voluntary Servitude. Search E-bay for a recording of this essay...and listen to it!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Valor and Discretion
    Page tzo
    While this article makes sense, as far as it goes, there is a problem with it: What happens, after a lifetime of putting up with abuse? When you are on your deathbed, are you going to say to yourself, "I wish I had resisted, at least once?" You cannot become more free by complying with every statist whim. The problem with being "the one who can take the abuse and remain standing" is that, after a while, you are no longer standing. You are on your knees. The problem also is this notion that every sign of resistance will be rewarded with a beat-down. It just ain't so. There are many, many cases where pushback had no adverse consequences whatever; other cases where the gain in self-respect was worth the pain. When one's personal situation calls for survival (e.g., when supporting a family), then survive. When that no longer holds, then at least on some occasions, don't put up with crap. And on the off chance that that results with the end of your life, then take as many of the bastards with you as you can. Eventually, if enough people do this, they will run out of bastards.
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 34 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    The article states "Despite his deep-rooted individualism, Thoreau was readily moved to activism against injustice. " Shouldn't this be BECAUSE of his deep rooted individualism?
  • katkanning's picture
    katkanning 8 years 34 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    Disappointing. Didn't much get into 'why he matters'.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 34 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    Some anarchist. All Chomsky ever talks about is foreign policy, the domain of the statists.
  • albergine's picture
    albergine 8 years 34 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    For myself, they went far enough when they agreed to participate, the rest was obvious.
  • albergine's picture
    albergine 8 years 34 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    well it can lie, cheat and manipulate as well as any other format, especially if mainstream pop music.
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 34 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    Muse's album "The Resistance" is a modern example of this.
  • wkmac's picture
    wkmac 8 years 34 weeks ago
    War on Film
    Web link Cheryl Cline
    Larison's comments were interesting but I found even moreso the comments section. As to the comments (negative) concerning the History Channel, I agree that many presentations are done from a bias POV and the background of the question who (?) is left to the viewer to determine and most people don't. Depending on their own bias, they accept or reject the ideas presented and that's just our human nature. At the same time, the History Channel does throw out ideas (sometimes) that provoke thought and to challenge the status quo and that to me is what's healthy and needed. Yesterday STR ran a story on the CIA, LSD and NY Subway system and ironically the History Channel ran (for the uppteenth time) "Secrets of the CIA". Now someone sees that on the history channel, provokes thought and an internet search and pooof, they discover STR. OK, I'll revealing my own bias here but you get the point. Provoking thought and the need for further individual study into a subject is an awefully needed thing these days and I welcome it from wherever it comes. Resisting my own personal bias, I wanted to ask some in the comments section if instead of the History Channel, would they recommend FoxNews or reality TV on the Fox Channel instead! The more I see of TV these days the more I feel intellectually insulted and appreciate the qualities of old Looney Tune cartoons as being more mentally stimulating. More often than not, I enter a room with the TV on and in about 2 minutes I feel the urge to stand up, look at the TV and shout, "aaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhh SSHHAADDUUPPP!" I love Foghorn Leghorn (another bias of mine) LOL!
  • albergine's picture
    albergine 8 years 34 weeks ago Page Thomas Van Wyk
    I know a person who is a Vegetarian, at least, they believe they're Vegetarian, as everyday, for breakfast, they eat bacon, when questioned regarding this oddity they say that because they eat so liitle meat that qualifies them to be called Vegetarian. There are many examples of such twisted logic. The conclusion i seem always to return to is that the attraction that makes for these incredible turns of character is deemed small enough so as not to be thought of as a danger, that the self will not be affected as the greater part understands the possibilities involved if the drift were allow to flow freely, but this example isn't just a once, a peek and run, never to return and so in no need of repeat as the lesson was learn't, problem being, these small visit's become repetitions that are bound gradually become habit, habits that meld into normal behaviour, much like brushing of the teeth. Then therefore there is little or no disinction between brushing one's teeth and say flipping the switch that looses a missile that takes out a village of innocent people because they were in the way of someones idea of whitening and on no lesser level of consequence than those that follow and support the building or continuation of the unseen hypocrisy in playful nothingness that then fog's the judgement and distorts the balance.
  • Guest's picture
    Wyobrd (not verified) 8 years 34 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Fasting triggers cellular apoptosis but no one is going to make any money off of that.
  • Guest's picture
    madtekwriter (not verified) 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Quake
    Page Jim Davies
    Wish you would lay off the anti-God stuff--unless you’ll admit that your image of him, in addition to being “omniscient, omnibenevolent and omnipotent” also includes him being “omni-interfering.” You have a view of God that is very different from mine. Your view lacks a concept of “free moral agency.” You suppose that religious folks think that God is like some chess player, moving pieces around some heavenly chessboard--therefore, no free moral agency. Truth (as I see it, anyway) is that actions have natural, logical, principle-driven consequences (e.g., people allow themselves to be ruled by governments, then governments abuse their subjects), and God is the ultimate non-aggressor--he only acts where and when free moral agents give him license.
  • albergine's picture
    albergine 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Quake
    Page Jim Davies
    i would tend to agree with 'ottersonroger' (first Comment) that it reads very much like what would be expected from a factually lacking Politicaly biased view of events/history. if the writer is without agenda/political affiliation - what would the reason be for such a narrow minded article (no offence meant) the link has a few interesting Facts (though i wasn't there) that may help form a different angle of attack for next time . http://www.historycommons.org/timeline.jsp?timeline=haiti
  • DennisLeeWilson's picture
    DennisLeeWilson 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Quake
    Page Jim Davies
    Please include author's name along with the title on the main page. I make it a point to read a select group of authors first and almost missed this article because author identity is unknown until link is opened.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Quake
    Page Jim Davies
    Constructive criticism is always welcome, ottersonroger, but here I saw criticism without constructiveness. What aspect of Haiti's history, I wonder, leads you to suppose that its people have suffered too little government instead of too much? FYI, there is no "party" here on STR. Even a quick visit to the "non-voting archive" should satisfy you that we eschew all political affiliation. Check out http://www.strike-the-root.com/vote.html True, we are philosophically libertarian, in that we see government as parasitic even at best; we start from the premise that every human is his own self-owner, and therefore that any governor, who would take away from him some at least of the life decisions he wants to make for himself, is antithetical to human nature. Possibly you have embraced the opposite premise. I'd be interested to learn which aspects of your own life you wish somebody else to rule. Jim Davies
  • wkmac's picture
    wkmac 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Quake
    Page Jim Davies
    Stefan Molyneux did a video interview on Haiti a month or so back. Here's the link below and draw your own conclusions. And Jim, thanks for your contribution and thoughts on the matter. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijf2hIwBgFc&feature=youtube_gdata
  • ottersonroger's picture
    ottersonroger 8 years 34 weeks ago
    Quake
    Page Jim Davies
    Very incomplete, superficial understanding of Haitian history. Selected points are chosen only if they support the party line.
  • Puck's picture
    Puck 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    You may be right, but if that referendum had been held on September 12th, 2001 we would probably have nuked Afghanistan. I'm not sure that level of democracy is a genie I'd want out of the bottle.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    I know how most STRers feel about voting, okay? But with that said I have long felt that if the American people could vote on this "world policeman role" as they do with referendums and ballot proposals on the local level, that America would very quickly return to the neutral, unentangled nation it started out as.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 35 weeks ago
    GDP Fetishism
    Web link Don Stacy
    This is probaably the simplest and clearest explanation of the shortcomings of GDP as a measurement that I have ever seen. Given the contant attention being paid to GDP by the MSM, it's well worth reading if you'd like to improve your understanding of GDP.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    I never though i'd see the day when using (government issued!) cash would be a sign post to terrorists.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    I admire Carson. I am surprised though to see him on STR.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    Chilling.
  • albergine's picture
    albergine 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    no matter how much (or little) their just using the paper that 'they' print in the first place, the peoples use is to launder it into some weak form of legitimacy, they get the land and mineral's to play with.
  • BrianDrake's picture
    BrianDrake 8 years 35 weeks ago Page Jakub Bozydar W...
    Like a box of 21 gourmet chocolates. Each delicious and satisfying. Even better all in the same box. Bravo Sir.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    Funny.
  • miamizsun's picture
    miamizsun 8 years 35 weeks ago
    Mandatory Molyneux
    Web link Cheryl Cline
    excellent!
  • JoshuaPettigrew's picture
    JoshuaPettigrew 8 years 35 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    From the poll: 33. Do you think Iran currently has nuclear weapons, or not? Feb. 12-15 2010 Yes, has weapons 71% No, does not 26% No opinion 3% This was based on about 500 interviews. I hope it does not reflect reality.
  • Guest's picture
    patpetrilloartist (not verified) 8 years 36 weeks ago
    Wheat and Chaff
    Page Bill Butler
    Thanks for the info, I'm doing research about this one. You helped me, thanks again. Mr. Petrillo MMA Pound for Pound
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 8 years 36 weeks ago Page Alex Schroeder
    Nicely done column; gets to the root of things. The power elite are thrilled to have people on the "left" and "right" jockeying for a chance to add their own favored tyranny to the mix; when the voters tire of the current party in power and put the opposite wing in charge, the new "leaders" begin adding "their side's" desired tyrannies WITHOUT dismantling the tyranny added by the previous crowd, despite campaign promises. This ratchet effect ensures that government power grows reliably, year after year. Smoking bans, as Alex points out, are just one example of the process.
  • Guest's picture
    clore333 (not verified) 8 years 36 weeks ago Page Alex Schroeder
    I would have appreciated this justified attack on eminent domain much more if the author hadn't engaged in shilling for corporations like McDonald's and Wal-Mart. The latter is a particularly egregious example to cite, as a study has shown that this corporate welfare queen has received more than one billion dollars in state subsidies, often via abuse of eminent domain. News & Views for Anarchists & Activists: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo/
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 36 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    I wonder if Congress will ever get around to passing a similar resolution regarding the Holodomor, the muder of more than 10 million Ukrainians by Stalin.
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 8 years 36 weeks ago Page Alex Schroeder
    This highlights the inherent weakness of positive law that ignores individual human rights. No matter its original intent (and that can always be argued), its subsequent interpretation can only be detrimental to human freedom. Yeah, let's all get back to that Constitution, wherein it is stated that the government controls all the land and private property does not exist. That's a fine foundation for a free society.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 8 years 36 weeks ago
    Guest Editor
    Story strike
    Glad to see STR is back. . . the first time I hit the site after it went down, my Anti-Virus alerted me. . . so nice that all wasn't lost. STR is the first site I hit in the morning, it goes great with the first cup o'mud and a cig. You guys rock.
  • buzaman's picture
    buzaman 8 years 36 weeks ago
    Guest Editor
    Story strike
    Welcome back STR! I was checking 4-5 times a day waiting for the site to come back up. A good friend is back!
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 36 weeks ago
    Guest Editor
    Story strike
    Me too. STR was always the first site I looked at in the morning. Welcome back.