Recent comments

  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 8 years 21 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    quenny, Please tell us what leaving Afghanistan and Iraq has to do with Barack Hussein Obama's health care reform bill. Ever wonder why not one of these omniscient collectivists ever suggest a "purely voluntary health care association"?
  • Guest's picture
    quenny (not verified) 8 years 21 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Leaving could be one of the hardest part of letting go... In this world we have to stand using our own feet. The Obama Wall Street Address at Cooper Union College was meant for president Obama to further explain his stand point on the health bill that can be going to the Senate later this week or next. The bill has already passed the House of Representatives, and only has just a little ways left on its way to becoming law. This reform bill has many optimistic and questionable sides to it. All I ask is that before you get all hot headed and worked up over it, do your research. Really spend some unbiased time finding out precisely what this bill is about and just how it will impact your life; you may be surprised at what you find.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 8 years 21 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    The next freedom construct must be, neither government nor anarchy, but a protectorate. A protectorate is negative in its function. It acknowledges the legitimacy of collective force but only for the protection of life, liberty, and property. ~ G. Edward Griffin
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 8 years 21 weeks ago Quotation strike
    These Natural Rights are referred to as “unalienable rights” in The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America of July 4, 1776. Unalienable. Inalienable… Inalienable rights. Rights which can never be abridged because they are so fundamental. – Black’s Law Dictionary, Abridged Sixth Edition, pg. 1057 Legal rights (sometimes also called civil rights or statutory rights) are rights conveyed by a particular polity, codified into legal statutes by some form of legislature (or unenumerated but implied from enumerated rights), and as such are contingent upon local laws, customs, or beliefs. In contrast, natural rights (also called moral rights or inalienable rights) are rights which are not contingent upon the laws, customs, or beliefs of a particular society or polity. Natural rights are thus necessarily universal, whereas legal rights are culturally and politically relative. - Wikipedia [Emphasis added] Each of us has a natural right [a “just claim”] - from the Creator - to defend his person, his liberty, and his property. These are the three basic requirements of life, and the preservation of any one of them is completely dependent upon the preservation of the other two. – http://bastiat.org/en/the_law.html
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 8 years 21 weeks ago Web link strike
    Now if we can just get Congress to spend its time watching porn instead of legislating.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 8 years 21 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    It may also have a "side effect" for individual secessionists, i.e. individuals who have seceded from the governments of men, they are among those "who can't provide proof of legal residency".
  • buzaman's picture
    buzaman 8 years 21 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    What a set of pipes, vocal joy.
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 8 years 21 weeks ago Page B.R. Merrick
    "People who put up with anything the system dishes out to them, are no friends of liberty, either. There has to be a line in the sand. Joe Stack had one, and his was crossed. That's all." Thank heavens that in the process of ramming his plane into that building that there were not other victims of the IRS's theft sitting in those offices with the two people who were killed, trying to defend their property in a less violent fashion.
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 8 years 21 weeks ago Page B.R. Merrick
    Actually, "evil" is relative to what the individual thinks. When I say that government is "evil," I am merely stating my opinion. I see government as the physical embodiment, the officialization, if you will, of what I consider "evil," which is the desire to possess The Ring of Power, or to control what other individuals do. If you get rid of this government, the virus that creates it still exists within too many individuals walking around on this land mass.
  • Guest's picture
    CarlaZ (not verified) 8 years 21 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    To gain democracy,it should begin with the the people who rules our country.We cannot immediately have it but it should reflect more on the implementation rather that just saying that we need democracy.I just remember the Oklahoma City bombing that happened 15 years ago that created a big impact on democracy because people have different perception of it.It is 15 years given that the Oklahoma City Bombing took place where 168 innocent people died just doing their day to day activities. Many people remember watching the news and seeing the devastation and destruction. 200 kids were left parentless, or with disabled parents. Hundreds more left in fear. This kind of destruction can't cause any good outcome. As this bombing and domestic terrorism showed, it is not the way to make change, because there were no radical changes made due to the bombing. The only thing this bombing did was uniting Americans together and shows us that hatred can't prevail.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 years 22 weeks ago Page B.R. Merrick
    The author spends a little too much time condemning Stack and exonerating IRS employees for my taste. Every one of us makes choices in life, good choices and bad choices. Unfortunately, the consequences for those choices are often not immediate, and sometimes don't happen at all. Bad choices are not always punished, good choices are not always rewarded. The choice to become an IRS employee is an evil one. Most who make this choice evade the consequences. The two who were killed by Stack did not. Oh, well. That does not make them just ordinary folks. They were still evil. They suffered a rather improbable consequence, but it was directly tied to what they did for a living (victimizing others), and the choice they made to do that. And Stack is not to be compared with Grigg either. When Grigg is as persecuted as Stack was, when the CPS actually takes his kids, we will see how he reacts (I suspect, with violence, which is the correct response). Oh, and paying a traffic fine in no way compares with what Stack put up with. I agree with Merrick that, "Government is the physical manifestation of a much deeper evil." We are all guilty of it in some way or another. But our ability to see and understand that evil, and rid ourselves of it, depends in part on our seeing that choices have consequences. Most people need to see that bad choices can be punished; and seeing that, they have plenty of incentive not to make bad choices. Joe Stack performed a service for liberty; he did not harm it. People who put up with anything the system dishes out to them, are no friends of liberty, either. There has to be a line in the sand. Joe Stack had one, and his was crossed. That's all.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 years 22 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    Unfortunately, this article implies a bright dividing line between producers and expropriators, where there is no such line. Most producers see no problem with sending their kids to a government school, receiving Socialist Security, or raiding Middle Eastern countries for their oil. So the first battle of the war will be within the brains of these people, deciding which they really want to be - producers or expropriators. Tea Party folks will have to face up to the fact almost all of them are hypocrites.
  • kborer's picture
    kborer 8 years 22 weeks ago Page B.R. Merrick
    That Joe became a government of one hits close to the mark. To say that government is not the root of evil, but the individuals who compose it, is a mistake. Considering government to be a separate entity to those individuals of whom it consists is a collectivist notion. Only actions can be evil and only individuals act. This does not change the fact that government is the locus of evil action.
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 22 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    With mass civil disobedience war may not be needed. Authority can only be grounded on acceptance by the subjects. Let us stop accepting this authority. Étienne de la Boétie teaches us that we merely need to stop helping the state for it to fall. I tried to post a link to the work "The Politics of Obedience: The Discourse of Voluntary Servitude" and the spam filter thought I was spamming. Anyway, if you are interested you can probably find it by Googling either the author or the work.
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 22 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    "Mathematics of Rule" proves who will win and why. The irony is, this is a re-run of a war that was already won, whose result forms the very basis of former western civilization (the rules by which we cooperate for MUTUAL self-interest): http://www.nazisociopaths.org/modules/article/view.article.php/c1/32
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 22 weeks ago Page Roger Young
    I agree with Jim Davies, in fact I will go further. Whichever of the major parties happens to “in power” at the moment automatically makes a large number of people who are loyal to the major party “out of power” more likely to sympathize with our point of view. I myself was once a Republican and began to drift more and more towards libertarianism during the Clinton years. I saw the abuses with Ruby Ridge and the Waco Massacre and began to question the very role of government in “protecting us”. If, in the 1990’s, I had read an article with the title “Please, Rush Limbaugh, Just go away” it would have made me LESS likely to pay attention to the actual arguments presented in that site. At this point in history we should present our arguments in such a way as to show them how we are alike, not how we are different. If a Republican becomes president in January of 2013 we should do the same for Democrats. Michael Cloud has a wonderful set of recordings called “The Essence of Political Persuasion" that teaches libertarians how to speak to people on the “Right” without alienating “The Left” and visa versa. It is a wonderful set of recordings and all of us can learn from him. http://www.theadvocates.org/epp.html
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 8 years 22 weeks ago Page Roger Young
    This column is accurate, and the key question, pertinent: "When will [people] realize that they DON’T need any leaders AT ALL?" However isn't it better to demolish idiots by showing the falsehoods in what they say or do, and if possible by questioning their premises, rather than by accusing them of having squeaky voices or stumpy legs? Glenn Beck still isn't thinking outside the box, but he does broadcast some true stuff and it seems inappropriate to belittle him without even having heard what he says. I believe the name for that style is "ad hominem." Put it this way: suppose a Tea Partygoer happens upon this article. He is angry about the increase in government under Obama, and eager to find out what's up. He likes Sarah and Glenn. Will this article motivate him to read more in STR and discover why nobody needs any leaders at all?
  • Plant Immigration Rights Supporter's picture
    Plant Immigrati... 8 years 22 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    From the article: "So what about Kanin’s report, which found that over 40% of rapes reported to police are false? I wouldn’t suggest that Kanin has a political agenda — but I do think his methodology (which consists of tabulating police data from an unidentified small town) was overly credulous." It could be - depending on the small town. When companies wish to test market a new product in the United States they pick a location that has demographics that roughly represent a cross-section of the demographics in the United States. I do not know if something like this was done in this study. Studying human behavior is not like studying human biology or health. Culture - including religious beliefs - must be taken into account. For example, let us suppose that, in this small town, 90% of the residents were members of a religion in which women were considered very lowly and consensual sexual behavior outside of wedlock is a grave sin that would make them an outcast for the rest of their lives. A woman who was caught having consensual sex might have an incentive to claim it was rape even if she loved the person. Was this the case here? I do not know. I do not know what town it was.
  • Guest's picture
    CarlaZ (not verified) 8 years 22 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    Just imagine if every thing a person does is illegal.Do you think he would be able to survive without fear and doubt?I don't think so! Like for example,a person who escape in paying taxes.Of course there is a corresponding penalty for that.Among the big things which governs income tax rates and tax theory in general in these United States is something called the Laffer Curve - which makes sense since it is a real laugher. It was made popular by Jude Wanniski, a crony of Donald Rumsfield, Dick Cheney, and later, Reagan and Bush, and the debate goes that there's a midpoint of taxation rates which makes for optimal collection and use of tax funding, which is intended to be basically payday cash advances from the individuals to the government. It's distinctly tied to Keynesian economics, and the Austrians (free market, libertarian types - not Reagan, btw) dispute its efficacy.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 8 years 22 weeks ago Page Roger Young
    I'm sorry Roger, but I must agree with rcrefugee's assessment, not much substance.
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 8 years 22 weeks ago Page B.R. Merrick
    It is great to have another essay from B.R. I think he's onto something here when he speaks about truth as a condition needed in the pursuit of freedom. Stack most certainly concluded with an untenable position when he initiated the violence. To sort of paraphrase Stefan Molyneux, the moral justifications for taking such actions become more and more convoluted the further we move away from truth. I think that the main truth that Stack willfully ignored was that the initiation of force is never morally justified. In my view, "winning" freedom will mean that one day we can persuade enough individuals not only to hear the counter argument against government, but also to hold to intellectual and moral honesty by knowing the simple truth that the initiation of force is immoral. If we can be honest in looking for the truth, I think the "diffusion and confusion" that tzo wrote about (here on STR, 4/04) is greatly diminished.
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 8 years 22 weeks ago Page Roger Young
    Sarah Palin is actually a great example of why voting is a useless gesture.
  • rcrefugee's picture
    rcrefugee 8 years 22 weeks ago Page Roger Young
    This stinker of an article is as shallow and trite as I've read in months. Maybe if we're lucky, Roger Young will "Just Go Away".
  • Bill Ross's picture
    Bill Ross 8 years 22 weeks ago Page B.R. Merrick
    Joe Stack made the same mistake "terrorists" and other non-strategic thinkers make: Failing to strike at the root of the problem or, mistaking pawns for the enemies of freedom. There will never be a shortage of pawns and, even though the system has as much care or allegiance for their pawns as for the rest of us (ie; absolutely none, apart from animal husbandry of prey), the system uses attacks on their pawns as a major part or their rationalizations (terror arguments) regarding why they need more power in their protection racket. Joe Stack made matters worse. The war for freedom can only be won by occupying the moral high ground. The truth is, we are all coerced by environmental control 101 to behave in a harmful, irrational manner and we ALL, including pawns of the system HATE it. Darwin warned us: Survival EQUALS adaptation to environment (the system) EQUALS ability to choose correctly EQUALS freedom: http://www.cli.gs/DarwinReconsidered THINK about it: http://www.cli.gs/IntelligentChoice
  • Guest's picture
    EbonyU (not verified) 8 years 22 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    I agree that Greece right now is suffering from a great economic tragedy that it was worsen to a BBB downgrade remark. It seems credit rating is vital to governments also, as Fitch has downgraded the credit rating of Greece to one of the lowest possible levels, BBB minus, with the rest of the European willing to help, but not too generously. (That proves the point about IGOs serving the interests of probably the most powerful member states.) Greece has been home to crisis after crisis, first liberation from Turkey, military and communist dictatorships, and now it needs payday loans from abroad to prop up its troubled economy. It's unpleasant to see the birthplace of Western Civilization struggle when its progeny disregards it.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 23 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Actual recording. It's great that someone had the courage to record it under stress.
  • Guest's picture
    Scott Friday (not verified) 8 years 23 weeks ago
    Economics for Dummies
    Page Paul Hein
    The economy can grow without the supply of the medium of exchange increasing. What happens is that each unit of the medium of exchange will become more valuable with respect to other goods as there are more goods available. This means that prices of those goods will generally decrease (price deflation), which is what we want. This is what makes it possible for those on the low end of the economic spectrum to enjoy a higher standard of living. It makes their money go further by allowing them to buy more. Also, when the medium of exchange tends to rise in value over time, saving instead of spending is made possible. In a system where the supply of the medium of exchange is increased, the value of that medium tends to decrease over time with respect to other goods. Thus you get higher prices (again, price inflation that results from inflation of the supply of money). In this environment, saving means you lose value over time and thus the incentive it to spend the money now before it loses value. It also tends to make people take more risks with investing in their attempts to get a return on their money that outpaces the rate of inflation. In a stable monetary system, saving by stuffing your mattress is relatively safe. Barring theft or accidental destruction, it will increase in value or at worst hold steady. In an inflationary monetary system, stuffing your mattress is a losing proposition and we have seen that investing in stocks and other financials is anything BUT safe in recent years. The supply of gold does increase every year. However, the new supply is quite small relative to the total existing supply and thus the increase is very small and tends not to experience sudden increases. Even many of the "big" gold rushes only had an effect in the area immediately around the sources of the gold. As you get out away from the source, the inflationary impact on prices lessens. However, if a large enough new supply were found and rapidly injected into the market, it would cause prices to react accordingly and they would likely go up, at least for a time.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 23 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    Very clearly expressed analysis with some original insights.
  • buzaman's picture
    buzaman 8 years 23 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    < / State >
  • Guest's picture
    scientia (not verified) 8 years 23 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    I sometimes wish that these types of leaks did not happen since it is clear that they exist and are available for easy consumption. This just means that this type of behavior is condoned since the elected officials are not being run out of town and the white house is not being picketed. If only there was a way to wake up our compatriots to the reality of the world instead of this stylized ideal leftover from "The Greatest Generation". How about loud airhorns?
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 23 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Wikileaks is a great organization and they've published all sorts of great material from whistle-blowers who have evidence of embarassing illegal activities especially of the govt or the companies they collude with. Naturally the USG wants to shut them down.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 8 years 23 weeks ago Web link strike
    This is, in my opinion, the best treatise ever written on the true origin and proper purpose of the law.
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 8 years 24 weeks ago Page tzo
    Fixed in article. Thanks.
  • winston smith's picture
    winston smith 8 years 24 weeks ago Page tzo
    the link under "Witness" is bad. go here to find it. ----> http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/joe-stacks-daughter-samantha-bell-calls-dad-he...
  • Guest's picture
    Hayduke (not verified) 8 years 24 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    I will not comply. I have five years left until I am eligible for our socialist medical care system. Until then, I will not now down to Mammon.
  • Guest's picture
    Hayduke (not verified) 8 years 24 weeks ago Web link Robert Fredericks
    I guess I qualify here as an "old folk," in my 6th decade of life. In my experience, young people in the United States don't know what socialism is, having never experienced it in action. Few have lived in communal living arrangements, none have experienced a socialist economy. Few have seen our capitalist oligarchy from the outside. I do not reject socialism. I work for its beginnings every day of my life.
  • Guest's picture
    Hayduke (not verified) 8 years 24 weeks ago
    Big Brother Calling
    Web link Robert Fredericks
    Actually, no. I have never used a cell phone, never will. I have a perfectly good telephone at home and at work, plugged into the wall where it can't get away. When I walk, I don't need a phone; don't want the distraction of its incessant ringing. Can't think with people yammering at me all the time. Technology should be held at arms length at all times, else it take control.
  • Steve's picture
    Steve 8 years 24 weeks ago Web link Cheryl Cline
    If the Seasteading Institute were working off the coast of New Hampshire instead of California, they'd get a lot of synergy with the Free State Project.
  • Puck's picture
    Puck 8 years 24 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    My respect for Robert Higgs increased--it was already very high--as I listened to this interview. I've been guilty of economic apocalypticism myself. While not papering over how bad things are and could become, Higgs brings a good measure of perspective, and humility, to his analysis of the current state of the economy. This is definitely worth a listen.
  • zrated's picture
    zrated 8 years 25 weeks ago Web link Little Alex
    this must be the movement's most tiresome fad.
  • Guest's picture
    Scott Friday (not verified) 8 years 25 weeks ago
    Economics for Dummies
    Page Paul Hein
    Nice article! For the interested reader, Murray Rothbard has several great writings about money. The following are listed in order of how long they are, shortest to longest. All of them are really good. The last one is his great treatise on economics in general and absolutely rocks! The Case for a 100 Percent Gold Dollar http://mises.org/daily/1829 What Has Government Done to Our Money? http://mises.org/books/whathasgovernmentdone.pdf The Case Against the Fed http://mises.org/books/fed.pdf The Mystery of Banking http://mises.org/mysteryofbanking/mysteryofbanking.pdf History of Money and Banking in the United States: The Colonial Era to World War II http://mises.org/books/historyofmoney.pdf Man, Economy, and State, with Power and Market http://mises.org/rothbard/mes.asp
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 25 weeks ago
    Economics for Dummies
    Page Paul Hein
    My dictionary says that economics is a social science (sic!) dealing with the production and distribution of goods and services. That definition, however, is based upon one colossal assumption: that there is a medium of exchange! I am not an economist, either. I did take two entry-level semesters of Economics many years ago, but I'd be an idiot to think that entitled me to pontificate on the subject. I do remember how the teacher defined the subject, though, on the first day of class: the study of how a community's limited resources are allocated in light of man's unlimited appetite. So defined, Economics does not require an intermediate medium of exchange, whether it be paper scrip or precious metal. Why is currency based on gold regarded as superior? Only because everybody wants it and is therefore willing to trade anything for it. Change that fact, and suddenly gold-based currency is no longer as attractive as it used to be. What if you had all your wealth invested in gold, and then the cold fusion breakthrough occurs. Now it's cheap to turn lead into gold; we can churn out gold by the hundredweight for pennies. What happens to your wealth? Currency can be based on anything that has value to enough people: horses, wives, Matchbox cars, stones with holes in them -- anything, so long as enough people, for whatever reason, will assign value thereto. It stands to reason, therefore, that if a government says, "This note is legal tender," and the people accept the fiat, it's as much currency as if based on gold. I suspect the real difference is that proponents of gold-based currency are thinking that it's a lot easier to manipulate the money supply when the money isn't based on a tangible commodity than when it is based on gold; and that is probably true. But that doesn't mean that the former isn't valid. It just means its value isn't as secure. I've always wondered how an economy with a gold-based currency can grow when it isn't able to acquire more gold. Isn't that a recipe for inflation? or would it be deflation?
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 25 weeks ago Page Alex Schroeder
    This is a difficult thesis for me, because a good system of roads, for example, serves a defensive function that is even more fundamental than its economic function. The interstate system in America was conceived with internal military transportation in mind. The speed with which warfare is conducted in modern times would seem to demand that a good system of roads be built before it is needed, and in order to do that a government must have the means to demand the sale of land. I think the analysis in this article overlooks a distinction in the development -- one might more appropriately say devolution -- of the concept of "public good." I am only hypothesizing such a devolution; but the same sort of deterioration took place in the field of law in the 20th century. Briefly, courts began supporting abrogation of contracts when such resulted in more efficient use of resources, the idea being that a more efficient use of resources benefited everyone. This approach subordinates the value of integrity, of keeping one's word, to economics, which should be deplorable to anyone of principle. So, I am wondering if a similar corruption has occurred with the notion of "public good." Perhaps "public good" was more narrowly defined in bygone days so as to include certain presupposed limitations based on intangible values that have waned or disappeared altogether from modern consciousness. If I were to hazard a guess, I'd suggest that this loss may be due in no small part to the depersonalized view of man himself as a mere member of this group or that class rather than as an individual, glorious in his own right. Maybe when man's existence as a noble creature was a given, no one would have dreamed of interpreting "public good" in merely economic terms so as to take from one individual and give to another. In other words, maybe the problems isn't that eminent domain is wrong, but rather that those applying the principle are corrupt and so apply it in a corrupt fashion. I don't see how eminent domain can be avoided in the modern era. The trick is that it has to be applied by men of good character, and these have become hard to find.
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 25 weeks ago
    Timing Is Everything
    Page Bill Butler
    "So what can you do about it?" I spend a lot of time these days thinking about just that question. "Not much, but if someone from Goldman Sachs tries to buy something from you, charge him double." What about refusing to sell to him at all? The value of money depends on whether the Seller will respect it. Some communities have begun issuing their own local currency, which is just another form of barter. I am a big fan of barter, inasmuch as it offers a way to exchange goods in a largely clandestine fashion. If a barterer doesn't pay income tax on his transaction, he may get caught and punished; but if a hundred thousand barterers don't pay income tax on their transactions, such an outcome is much less likely. So, besides doing your part to make those ill-gotten, inflated dollars worthless, this approach denies the government revenue while at the same time taking you off the economy train that is speeding down the track toward inevitable disaster. Barter also has considerable potential for reinvigorating local community consciousness and spirit. I just can't say enough good things about it, in the current climate. Naturally, it goes without saying that life as we know it has ended. We will not be able to hold onto the conveniences and lifestyles we have become accustomed to enjoying; indeed, these have been slipping away for some time (how many families are making it on just one income?). I expect this process to accelerate. We need to stop thinking in terms of holding onto a past that is built on a crumbling foundation and build a new foundation, atop which we can build another prosperous economy -- perhaps not for ourselves, but for our children and our children's children.
  • Guest's picture
    Tom Terrific (not verified) 8 years 25 weeks ago
    Valor and Discretion
    Page tzo
    Thank you for this well-written, thoughtful and educational article. The moral dilemma referred to in a few of the comments is unnecessary. Backing down and complying needn't be about a lack of courage; it can be about picking your battles, viewing your opportunity to resist as a resource and spending it where it will be most effective. Only you know which concern is paramount to you. I will comply with an oppressor's dictates if by so doing I remain at liberty to cause all sorts of other kinds of trouble. Take the long view. Bow and scrape, and then corrupt your neighbors when the oppressor has turned his attention elsewhere. :) The non-violent non-cooperators are the only real threat by the oppressed to an oppressive regime; and don't think that some of them don't know it. Let's get busy and cause as much trouble as we can, while we can! There's a vast populace out there, ignorant of their power; and we must educate them.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 25 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    This is a very good discussion about IP, but unfortunately the audio quality is poor for much of what Kinsella has to say.
  • miamizsun's picture
    miamizsun 8 years 25 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    The sad part is that legions of Keynesians will see this as a great move. Just watch CNBC for proof. I've been really disappointed that there aren't more people in congress like Dr. Paul, or who at least get it. And when the defecation hits the ventilation, everyone will look surprised, and start pointing fingers. Of course no one could have seen this coming..... ;-) Regards
  • Bill Walker's picture
    Bill Walker 8 years 25 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Sure, why have all those expensive 'reserves' taking up valuable computer memory. After all, the no-reserve policy got Zimbabwe where it is today...
  • J3rBear's picture
    J3rBear 8 years 25 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Ahoy mateys! She have a swashbuckling new captain, but the U.S.S. American Corporatocracy be running true to her same ol' course.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 8 years 26 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Good for him!