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  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 1 day ago Web link Westernerd
    States, like abusive partners, tend to resort to physical violence to prevent any separations they don't approve of, (cf. U.S. Civil War 1861-5, Biafra 1967-70, Ireland, 1916, Chechnya,1995-6 & 1999-2000, Kurdistan, 1990-ongoing). And even if the over-state agrees to some sort of referendum on succession (c.f. , Quebec 1995, Scotland 2014, "Brexit" referendum, 2016), legal flim-flammery and other okey-dokey often belie the promises made. The only true independence comes either from an armed uprising, (Ireland, 1916), or if the over-state just bails (East Germany, 1989). Only exception I can think of is the Mormom migration away from Illinois to  the Salt Lake Valley, 1844-1850. Although SLV was claimed by the U.S. gov, the Republic of Mexico, and by native aboriginal people, none were willing or able to excercise state-level violence to oppose their migration, and so the Mormons were sucessfully able to have an independent community for a few decades. 
  • mishochu's picture
    mishochu 4 weeks 2 days ago Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    Atheism doesn't inoculate one from religiosity. Great stuff.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 4 weeks 2 days ago Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    Indeed.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 4 weeks 3 days ago Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    In the ZGBlog to which you refer, Alex, I commended you for your powerful imagination when creating works of horror fiction.  I see above that that conceptual, abstract attribute is still at work.   Thanks though for its second sentence. I'm quite content that STReaders study both arguments, and pick the one for themselves that makes the better sense.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 4 weeks 3 days ago
    Keep Hillary Out
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Thanks to all who sent a copy of yesterday's ZGBlog to their zillions of voting friends. 80 of 90 big newspapers endorsed Hillary, but your action kept her out :-)
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 4 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Thanks for that link; I hadn't heard of that connection.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Why is it that the normies never seem to ask (e.g. "Who benefits?") from the drug war? WTF would all these drug warriors and their parasites do without a huge churning mass of humanity to spy on, bust, run through the courts, imprison, "treat" for addiction, etc.?
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    The ruling classes HATE the idea of people owning their own homes, small or not, because as some fuckin' commie said during the early Bolshevik years, people that own their own land and grow their own food are hard to manage. And so a ''small house" (or any house really), is definitely a thing  to be discouraged. Property owners who also have their own wells, septic systems, orchards, gardens, or live stock are even more counter-progressive, and if they have a wind mill, solar panel array, or wood stove too, well that's even worse, but if they have lots of guns too, well then they're evil, food-hoarding kulaks! And we all know where having that designation can lead to. Uncle Beast would greatly prefer that we all be homeless urban squatters lining up at EBT and Obama Care kiosks for our daily rations. Destitute lumpen proles are easier, (way easier) for Beasty to manage.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 6 days ago Web link KenK
    Google or search "EBT cards not working" and watch people throwing fits and trashing stores. And that's just for a few hours of outage. Two months of that shit and they'll be eating each other. 
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 6 days ago Web link KenK
    America isn't this bad yet, but the welfare state subsidizing the blue state masses that the Left requires to stay in power can't be sustained forever, so it's getting there.  
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 5 weeks 2 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Some, perhaps even most, people conflate "whistleblower" with "rat", "nark", or someone who rats out others upon their being caught for more lenient treatment for themselves. Gov and corp spox people often try to spin the narrative that way as a form of damage control. 
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 5 weeks 4 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    PS: I didn't mention it in the article, but there is a prudery here that H. L. Mencken would have identified with the alcohol prohibitionists and other "uplifters." These are the people who hate it when other people have a good belly laugh or can relax over a few drinks -- or even worse -- decorate their homes in bright colors or (God forbid) even wear them! It's the kind of behavior that wants to measure and regulate and dictate every act and emotional expression you may have.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 5 weeks 4 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    That's a hilarious comment! Thanks for the observation. Yes, Trump is tasteless, especially in unguarded moments, and I'm not voting for him even though he may crack open the "fixer establishment," but the over-the-top responses to his tastlessness -- the responses that want to punish him and his followers with more than a raised eyebrow and demonize and indict and shriek and obtain extreme retribution and ban him and his followers and compel agreement before you are considered part of the human fold -- seem way out of proportion. Frankly, it seems even unbalanced mentally if it isn't just a passion play of political theater acted out for the cameras. Or maybe it's just like those critters in the film "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." They KNOW you are not ONE OF THEM, and you must be pointed at and hunted down and killed (they hope). Way over the top, unless you're an unhinged alien from another planet. It is perfectly in line with the crazy interpretations applied to his remark about political resistence from the 2nd Amendment crowd. All that shrieking over tasteless remarks and not a word about policies that actually rain death upon civilian popluations in Asia and Africa and the Middle East. Somebody's got their priorities really messed up!
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 5 weeks 4 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Thanks, Jim. And yes, Butler's books -- espeically the Boundaries... title and the one on Chaos have connected our ideology to findings in chaos/complexity theory and to swarm theory. Over the years, I've tended to link these up the Heisenberg's uncertainty principle (which seems like a kissing cousin to free choice) and to the concept of "free choice" (liberum arbitrium) in medieval Catholocism. Even the concept of the "singularity" or beginning of the universe seems possible to link to caprice or an either/or occurrence that seems eerily like free choice. All of this is highly speculative, of course, but what I find very positive about this is that the NAP and libertarian theory seems to coincide very closely with how the universe works -- an "as you like it" caprice or choice or honoring of individualy and lack of central direction in favor of spontaneous order.  
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 5 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Better yet, make it an invasive species, which overtakes the species of bureaucrat which is hell-bent on interfering with peaceful people.
  • Kevin M. Patten's picture
    Kevin M. Patten 5 weeks 4 days ago
    Clintonism, Unplugged
    Page Kevin M. Patten
    The quote is from a profile that Vidal wrote of Ronald Reagan, and its inference is nuclear war, which is why, like Jim said, Hillary must lose next week. I wasn't intending for this piece to be this long, but I kept adding and adding, and with the reasoning that I didn't want someone to come back and ask "What's your evidence?" If the Libertarian Gods ever bless me with a print publisher, I'd be happy to put some of this stuff into paper form. Alas, you cannot BEG publishers to tell you to fuck off. 
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 5 weeks 4 days ago
    Clintonism, Unplugged
    Page Kevin M. Patten
    I must agree it's a bit too long for my taste (confession: I skipped some) but it's vital that Hillary loses next week, and this cannot hurt, and anyway the cartoons were great. The one of a smiling Bill captioned "It's not rape / if you're a Democrat" was on its own worth the price of admission.   The first one, too, was germane especially in view of Comey's latest move. Last week's ZGBlog listed 24 suspicious deaths close to the Clntons, and it's quite understandable that he doesn't wish his to be the next. We have here a woman in the Caligula class.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 5 weeks 4 days ago
    Clintonism, Unplugged
    Page Kevin M. Patten
    This column begins with an incomprehensible quote and goes on to spend a huge number of words talking about ... something Hillary-related.  Perhaps if I drank enough cups of coffee I'd have the energy to wade through all of it.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 5 weeks 4 days ago
    Consent and Secession
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Alex, your rejection above of the concept of rights moved me to write the current edition of the Zero Government Blog, to compare it with some other familiar concepts that are entirely real.              You are not the villain here, but you have been badly misled, and that makes me sad. I hope the Blog will help restore your understanding of the rational foundations of liberty.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 5 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Hey Sharon. What we need to do here is come up with a GMO bureaucrat species. One that goes to work and stares at the wall in a semi-comatose condition until quitting time and then goes home, thereby avoiding inflicting any further damage on the environment and aggravation or expense to us. Here in MI most of our vast forests are either privately owned or occuppied by the "state" of MI rather than the feds. You guys out west are uniquely cursed with absentee federal occupiers and I do feel for you.
  • Melinda L. Secor's picture
    Melinda L. Secor 5 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Indeed. There is some evidence that previoustly released altered mosquitoes may have contributed to the outbreaks they're aiming to resolve in the first place. These plans to "improve" the environment always seem to come with unintended consequences. In my area, for instance, the environmentalists decided that the local salt cedar trees were an invasive species, choking out more "desireable" trees. Meanwhile, there are very few trees here to begin with, desirable to the environmentalists or not...we are in the high desert. Anyway, they released a "specialized" beetle to eradicate the salt cedars. It did some damage as intended the first year, then multiplied and spread to wipe out a hefty percentage of the trees they'd done all this to "save." Yet, after many such follies over many years, there are still arrogant fools who believe they can and should "manage" our environment.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 5 weeks 5 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    What an insanely bad idea it is to introduce GMO into the environment like this. 
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 5 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Thanks Lawrence for a good suggestion.   Amazon is out of stock of Chaos (it should be possible to make a joke out of that) but I've downloaded Restraint for 3 bucks and the other two are e-freebies from Mises.org.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 5 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Crime ebbs & flows for a whole host of reasons. Legalizing abortion & birth control in 1973 was big factor too. 
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 2 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Perhaps you're right, in saying there are two types of criminals.   Or perhaps there is a kind of Jekyll/Hyde thing going on. Government people are kriminals in all they do, in their "official" capacity. But back at home, they may be as nice a set of neighbors as one could desire. They may even exercise a normal conscience. Milgram may have fingered the difference.   If that's the case, some of them at least are open to the presentation at TinyURL.com/QuitGov.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 3 hours ago Web link KenK
    So democracy is about to die. What matters is what follows.   Alexander Tytler: 'A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until a majority of voters discover that they can vote themselves largess out of the public treasury.' In that part of California, that moment has arrived.   It will be followed either by a dictatorship, or by a free society. STReaders have the responsibility of determining which. The means for achieving the latter is available here.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 weeks 23 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Scientists cannot do a controlled experiment to determine the degree to which, say, consumption of junk food, will increase propensity to commit (real) crimes. Probably the closest thing to a study here is Weston Price's research, laid out in his book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. He was primarily interested in studying physical degeneration, but also found that mental and moral degeneration went along with it. As far as government-style kriminals go, that is a good question. It could be that there are 2 (or more) types of criminals. Perhaps the first kind is lacking in self-control, which may be a result (at least in part) of problems with their nutrition or toxic exposure. The government kriminal may have adequate self-control but no conscience to speak of. Not sure, though, just speculating here.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 23 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Very interesting. I noticed that Blayock made a good case that people already presumed anti-social (prisoners, though we know that half of them committed no krime) responded well to improvements in diet etc. But I didn't notice him consider the correlation the other way round; that is, for example, what proportion of habitual consumers of junk food turn to krime, compared to consumers of well balanced diets?  The proportion of all US adults in prison is 1%; far, far too high for justice but for this kind of measurement it's far too low to have much significance, wouldn't you agree?   That question is a tough one, because I'd not be surprised to learn that habitual junk-food eaters are also in the lower socio-economic classes and therefore face a whole range of other pressures to lead a life of krime. I wonder how one can separate these factors so as to get a clean measure.   One other question occurs: we also know that the primary anti-social kriminals in society are government people; their entire business is to violate rights. Yet I'd be very surprised to learn that any of them are deprived of a healthy diet; rather, the opposite - and fine wines to wash it down. Doesn't that cast doubt on Blaylock's case?
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 1 day ago Web link KenK
    The reporter who wrote this piece for the Oregonian seems to think the dust up with informants was the reason for their acquittals, but I don't. People, especially in the western states, are becoming increasing angered at the tactics the feds are using to run people off the land. FYI, while the trial itself was held in lefty Portland,  the jury was selected from the outlying areas, (near where the incident played out) where many people make their living working the land, as well as in mining, ranching, timber, and such. 
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 1 day ago Web link KenK
    Some SF Bay area tech investors are keeping this whole SmartGun™ product development thing going despite the nearly non-existent demand for them. Here’s an idea: mandate that the Secret Service details that tend to POTUS and the rest of the fed gov’s V.I.P. security entourages use it exclusively as their primary side arm. That ought to be enough to kill it outright methinks.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 1 day ago Web link KenK
    I screwed up. The intro for this link should be, "Russia Trolls America with Offers to Send Election Monitors". Hope the irony (and humor) isn't lost on anyone because of my mistake.  Ken.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Jim, that's a very good question. If you are a committed Szaszian, then you will deny the possibility that there are factors beyond individual choice that have a bearing on the morality of our behavior. But I believe that Szasz overstated his case in this regard. There is strong evidence that factors such as poor nutrition and environmental toxins can have marked effects on our mental health and, in some cases this leads to criminal behavior. Here is a good talk about nutrition and criminal behavior by neurosurgeon and researcher Dr. Russel Blaylock. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SLVCXZbcIk&index=13&list=FL6RmTGiJ4XYVK... I also think that it is possible that, with the heavy metals used in vaccines, that the government is seeding the NEXT crime wave with the recent out-of-control CDC vaccine schedule. I read recently that there was an uptick in crime recently. Time will tell if that is what is happening. But even if that does turn out to be the case, we can be quite sure that such a connection will be vehemently denied and probably not even mentioned as a possibility.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Tetraethyl lead... who'd ha thunk it?  Thanks Saul for the link.  It's a well written piece, despite its home in Mother Jones and its inevitable push for environmental action.   Correlation is not causation, but the author deals with that quite well by addressing the effects of lead poisoning on the brain. He did not, though, spend time on the moral issue.   Crime (or rather what I call Krime, the sort that has victims) hurts people, damages their rights in some way, and hence is morally reprehensible. But if a big part of its cause is actually a chemical, present in the air we breathe as a result of simple accident, a coincidence that added it to car fuel, what happens to moral accountabiltiy? How does the will fit in, the choice of bad over good, the culpability? "Not guilty, your Honor, because Exxon diminshed my responsibility..."   The author mentions Roe v Wade, and that makes a lot of sense to me. It led to fewer unwanted kids, and so to fewer maladjusted teens a decade or two later.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 6 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Well put.  I remember what a revelation it was, many years ago, when I read some Indian philosopher (I forget who now) who pointed out that judges require criminals to avoid unemployment, as do police, jailers, etc. etc.  Much like "If God didn't exist, people would have to invent Him", if crime didn't exist, then would-be statist thugs who weren't successful in creating "crimes" would have to find honest work, an apparently very unappealing prospect for that kind of person.  So, they invent crimes everywhere you look, to grow their pyrimids of power.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Very good article. However, I believe that the most compelling explanation for the decline in violent crime is discussed here: http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2016/02/lead-exposure-gasoline-cr...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 2 days ago
    Backing Bunk
    Page Paul Hein
    We saved S&H green stamps and pasted them in little books because it was fun to do so. ;-) Something for the kids to do... I don't remember if we actually got anything from them.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 6 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Very nicely done, Paul.  Addresses numerous things succinctly, and connects them all.  Sharing widely.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 2 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Yes, I believe much of what appears to be support for Trump, is actually support for the damage he is doing to the Government Religion. That's so when he is running for office; if he actually gets in I doubt he will change much. A few weeks ago I made the case for voting Trump, on the sole issue of likelihood of nuclear war (if Hillary wins). After all, nothing else matters if the whole Earth is being obliterated. But in the end I decided not to vote for him, because the connection between my vote and nuclear war was pretty remote! Anyway I figured the Deep State would just assassinate him. Strangely, when I made this case, I got a negative reaction from some Voluntarists that can only be described as religious. I'm not a religious person. BTW, I can give two examples of incrementalism that have worked. 1) The concealed carry movement. I opposed the half-measure of government-regulated carry, thinking it would short-circuit any drive to what's been called "constitutional carry", but now I think it actually advanced that cause. How many states now have "constitutional carry" these days, 9 or 10? It seems to be coming along nicely. 2) Same thing with government-regulated homeschooling. Sure, the state got into it to try to co-opt it, and to re-capture homeschoolers, but there are an awful lot of "noncompliant" homeschoolers these days, and many of them ended up that way via the government "legitimization" of homeschooling. I think noncompliant homeschooling is much farther along than it would have been without the partial government surrender. I'm still not a big fan of incrementalism, but I no longer think it is necessarily a fatal mistake as I once believed.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 2 days ago
    Backing Bunk
    Page Paul Hein
    Nicely reasoned, Paul.   I had missed the news that the Ruble is gold-backed. What source do you have on that? - the Wiki page on it makes no mention of gold backing since the early 20th Century. I wonder if perhaps the "backing" means just that the Russian government has some gold in its vault.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 3 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    As one who has actually witnessed alpha males and the female reaction to their presence  Trump's comments seem pretty accurate, if tasteless. At an airport layover some playoff baseballers (around a dozen) came on in Chicago. Young, buff, famous, and multi-millionaires one and all, they had females of all types on the plane flush-faced and bothered. "Those guys are such assholes", one of my XX seat mates commented to another. "Oh yeah. I wish they'd come back here though." The ballers could have just walked up and groped, kissed, or done whatever with most of the women on that flight and gotten away with it too.  The only thing worse than being hit on is not being hit on. 
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 6 weeks 3 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Butler Shaffer is one of the most important libertarian theorists, and his many books and articles have clarified the meaning and vital importance of well-drawn and visible boundaries in creating peaceful human relationships. That's why I mentioned him so early in my new article, "Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump and Pussy Control." If you found Stephan Kinsella's writings on IP compelling, Butler offers a real learning experience!   Among Butler's books are the following: Calculated Chaos Wizards of Ozymandias Boundaries of Order In Restraint of Trade   "Calculated Chaos" explores the problems of poor boundary definition and the link to complexity and chaos theory, "Wizards of Ozymandia" explores the warfare state, "Boundaries of Order" is perhaps his most in-depth writing on boundary theory, and "In Restraint of Trade" is a history of business attempts to circumvent and undermine the free market. You can't do much better than these!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Having read Halbrook's book, Alex, would guns have been any use, in your opinion, in preventing or moderating the Holocaust?   Suppose the Wiemar / Nazi gun prohibitions had not been enacted, or suppose they had been widely ignored, especially by Jews. How would that have affected the ultimate outcome, aka the Final Solution?   It began slowly, recall, as government tyranny usually does; how to boil a frog. Jews were prevented from holding responsible jobs, then from marrying Aryans, then were deprived of property - but allowed to emigrate. Only later, after the US entered the war and Jews could no longer be used as bargaining chips, did the large-scale systematic slaughter begin.   So at what stage would a gun in the household have stopped that progression?   Would a University lecturer have shot his Chancellor upon being told he was being fired by order of the government pursuant to the Nürnberg laws? Would he have shot the SA troopers when they arrived to evict his family from their home (when he would certainly have been heavily out-gunned)?   Or would German Jews have organized some kind of militia to fight the army and police, in the hope of overthrowing the government?  Bear in mind Tandy's warning about the futility of armed revolt. The Warsaw Ghetto uprising in 1943 was amazing and heroic and used only a handful of stolen guns, but still 13,000 Jews were killed and transports to the death camps were not stopped. Had they all been armed it might have had a better outcome, but how could they possibly have taken guns with them from home to ghetto, when all they were allowed was a suitcase or two?   This is not for a moment to discourage anyone from owning guns if he so wishes, merely to question their utility in terminating government or even in defending oneself from its predations.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Early computers didn't surface until 1945, but you're right about punched-card tabulators, sorters etc. I believe those were also the main products sold to the FedGov to facilitate its Vietnam war, under the euphemism of "Defense."  Through the 60s and 70s, though, I recall that IBM sales to government were only about 10% of its business.   The standard you name poses an ethical dilemma to multi-customer firms. At the start of the extraordinary documentary The Wannsee Conference (a must-see movie now on YouTube) the camera pans along a line of radiators of cars driven to the meeting by top Nazis; Mercedes of course, and Auto Union, later Audi, and... Ford. Is Ford to blame for selling cars to members of the German government?   In my Transition to Liberty I visualize that after learning what freedom and government really are, government workers will quit - about 20 million of them. Progressively, of course. Then in addition there are many more millions working in contractor firms, and I suggest they too will quit if more than half of their working day is devoted to government contracts. Very roughly, I counted the total all told at about 40 million. A great deal of job-changing to take place! Those in contractor firms like Boeing would not necessarily have to quit the firm, though; a lot of them will apply for and be given transfers to divisions that serve the non-government market, like airlines in that case.        
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Whitehead almost seemed to cross over. But not quite: "...Let’s not waste any more time on predator politics..." As though there might, just might, be another style of politics other than predator. But for him (And Rutherford), this display of anger almost makes them appear to have turned the corner. "...This is what happens when politics is allowed to trump principle: “we the people” lose..." One closer step might have been the acknowledgement that "...politics is the trumping of principle...". Maybe next year. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    If you had read the book, rather than just responding to a picture, you'd see the narrative begins with 1928, not 1938. There is actually more material dealing with the 1928 and 1931 laws than with the 1938 law (if you leave out the comparison of the 1938 law with the 1968 USGCA). How predictable your response was. I see they are out of stock. If you want to bother with actually reading it, go on Amazon.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Not only has the media, the women's movement and the religious right given up principle for power, but so has the anti-war movement. Anyway, what is power for, if not access to women? Women have made themselves whores to the Government Pimp, rather than taking care of business themselves. No wonder their gains look illusory. It looks like the Rutherford Institute is going anarchist on us. That's new, right? No more of the haranguing us to vote.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Just an editorial comment. In two places in the article, I wrote, "Don't blame me." Somehow they got reversed; that is, the first should say, "Don't blame me, I didn't vote for him!" The second should say, "Don't blame me, I didn't vote!" It makes more sense that way.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 5 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    The soft tyranny approach, where the dictatorship buys loyalty with money, has about run its course and now there's just the iron fist left. Any comments from Chavez & Maduro's Hollywood synchophants now? *crickets*
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 5 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    I wished they’d have paid me a bonus when they put a stop-loss on my discharge for a year. I got a whole $1,200 extra pay for my involuntary year of service.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 5 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    When did they ever need an excuse?