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  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 31 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    Thanks very much for the information, NoMNoM. I knew that as government "incorporated" UL's (and other such firm's) standards, Ringo's Law would manifest itself, but I wasn't aware of the problems you described. Nor was I aware of the NFPA; I'll look into them and the subject generally before any new column that covers regulation, either directly or as an aside.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    Some more recommended reading, regarding nuclear power being "..a proven source of energy...", for you, ProtoGoth. "Precisely because the stakes are so high and there’s so much room for unforseen things to go wrong, nuclear power is uninsurable on the private market."
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    This is what can happen to slaves, voluntary or involuntary, it matters not.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    G'day Paul, First of all, that would not be "secession", by virtually anyone's definition[1]: "the act of withdrawing from membership in a group". (Source: Black's Law Dictionary, Sixth Edition (c.1991), page1351) What, precisely, do you mean by, "simply stop paying attention to the federal government"? And, what about the STATE OF WYOMING, which has officially subjected itself to the dominion of the federal government[2]; are you going to "simply stop paying attention" to it, too? And, again, in precisely what way will you "simply stop paying attention" to it? ___________________________________________________________________________________ [1] http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dictionary/entry/secede http://www.yourdictionary.com/secede http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/secede http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/secede http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/secede?show=0&t=1300443910 http://www.wordnik.com/words/secede [2] Article VI, second paragraph, "This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding." [Emphasis added]
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 31 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    On further reflection, I should say there is a huge problem with the pragmatic approach that we haven't considered here. Michael writes, "He or she is willing to accept any advance, however small, toward his or her larger goals." The problem is with focusing entirely on the single issue. My example above was permitted CC leading eventually to permitless CC. All well and good, if that is all one is concerned about. Sure looks like an advance, eh? The problem is, while you are spending a lot of effort getting forward progress on this one issue, you are taking a beating everywhere else. So on net, you are not getting an advance. You have just invested a lot of time in a setback. Indeed, my monitoring of the situation, with the Wyoming Liberty Index, noted year after year 3 or 4 times as many liberty-harming bills as liberty enhancing bills. After a while, it doesn't matter that Wyoming passed permitless CC just recently. We are still worse off. What's the solution to this dilemma? I think revolution will be the end result, whether we try to be pragmatic or ideological.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    I think it would be a little provocative, heh. A better strategy would be to not formally secede, but simply stop paying attention to the federal government (along with other measures such as arresting federal agents who are assaulting the people, such as happened in Montana lately with the drug busts). De facto secession, rather than de jure. This also does not have the problem that Suvarans noted, about those individuals not wanting to secede.
  • Andrew_M_Garland's picture
    Andrew_M_Garland 3 years 31 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    People paid payroll taxes for thirty years to support those who had retired. They paid in more than was needed for those retirees. The government did not invest the extra cash; it spent it on government salaries and projects. Now, those people want to retire. To support them, younger people will be asked to pay FICA taxes at about double the previous rate, 24% instead of the current 12.4%. (You may think that the employer is paying 6.2%, but it all comes out of the production of the worker.) Those younger people will be wise to the scheme, and will wonder about who is going to pay for them. They may not like the idea that their savings will be vanishing, leaving them with only the option of extracting support from the next younger cohort of people. They may resist. Ponzy Schemes Like Social Security There is nothing real in the "trust fund". There is only a political promise to find the money somewhere that was paid in and already spent. The shortfall is about $15 trillion in today's dollars, about equal to the entire yearly income of everyone in the US. That promise is much more than what is recorded in the trust fund, which is itself only an unfunded promise. Medicare and Medicaid are much larger and equally unfunded, except by much higher taxes in the future, and not just on the rich. ObamaCare Bails Out Medicare
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    "Police prevarication" -- what an interesting way to describe the routine perjury committed with impunity by those sworn, trusted and PAID to uphold the law. Jesus, they get away with murder; and you expect them to be honest -- why?
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    As long as Big Brother was just beating up on inner city junkies, cocaine-crazed Negroes, long-haired Hippie war protestors, Spanish-speaking day laborers and Muslim fanatics, John Q. Public was perfectly content to turn his back, close his eyes and cover his ears. Now Big Briother is beating up on John Q. Public. I wonder if now Mr. & Ms. Public will get around to getting pissed off enough to speak up. Somehow I dolubt it.
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Well, a third party tester would only be used by those seeking an impartial result, I guess. Follow the money on this subject, it will lead you to interesting places/people.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Well deserved. Notice that one of their spokespersons, Paul Eckerstrom, said this, "We actually want to stay in the union." Of course you do; after all, who would support your socialist programs if you didn't, Paul, you? Have a great day, Sharon Secor.
  • JoshuaPettigrew's picture
    JoshuaPettigrew 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Another thing that bothers me about this is that apparently Rapiscan (the makers of many of the scanners) were the ones doing the tests. Why wouldn't you get a third party to test these things? This whole thing smells to me. Prediction: rosy stats will be released, but the truth will leak out when some big event is occupying the public mind.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Your point is well made. Have a great day!
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Thanks for the generous praise and the well made point regarding collectivists. Best Regards...
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    I do, of course, agree with you at the most basic level. However, I also believe that for many, the progression towards the sort of liberty found in a State-free society is a gradual one. It is difficult for many to conceive of a life or society without government of the sort we see today. Thus, State secession can be seen a step in the right direction, and hopefully, the movement away from formal/mandatory government would continue (i.e., first the rejection of the federal government, then state, etc. and so on, until we finally arrive at individual secession or the concept of individual liberty as a workable, practical means of social organization.) Thank you for taking the time to comment, your thoughtful words and precise perspective are always appreciated. Best Regards...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    G'day Sharon Secor, I give your intro to this TEN BIG STARS! However, we need to keep in mind that only a "collectivist", (as opposed to an "individualist"), would wish to force their fellow citizens, who are against secession, to secede with them.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Logically, if one professes to believe in individual liberty, then to be consistent one must be against State secession, because State secession is, after all, nothing more than another variation of the majority forcing its will upon the minority. The only logical position for true lovers of liberty is that of individual secession.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    "Furthermore, as is usually, or always, true of Drew’s ilk, he argues from 1st amendment, for free speech rights, blah, blah, blah. The real issue, however, is property rights. Who owns the AV recording equipment? In fact, who owns the photons reflected from the arresting cop’s body once those photons strike your body or your video recorder?" ~ Liberal in Lakeview To answer those questions, if one is a Fourteenth Amendment citizen, i.e. if he has "submitted [himself] to the dominion of [the] government", as, with little doubt, this person has, the following evidence is given. March 9, 1933 – Senate Document No. 43, 73rd  Congress, 1st Session:  “The ownership of all property is in the state; individual so-called “ownership” is only by virtue of government, i.e., law amounting to mere user; and use must be in accordance with law and subordinate to the necessities of the State.”  (Repeated in: Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Foreign Relations, February 17, 1950 page 494; Constitution for the United Nations Industrial Development Organization, Treaty Document 97-19, and the Communist Manifesto).
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    If we look past the mirrors and through the smoke, the only option truly protected, for those who have "submitted themselves to the dominion of [the] government" (citizens), is "the right...to petition the government for a redress of grievances", the right to beg their master[1]. _______________________________________________________________________________ [1] PETI'TION, v.t. To make a request to; to ask from; to solicit; particularly, to make supplication to a superior for some favor or right ~ Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    The first thing that strikes me is the that it seems that virtually no one knows, in this day and age, that the true purpose and intent of First Amendment of the United States Constitution was solely to protect dissidents, individuals who spoke or wrote words "critical" of the government. The constitutional basis for freedom of speech...can be traced directly to the 1735 trial of John Peter Zenger, a German immigrant who worked as a Colonial newspaper publisher. Zenger’s newspaper, the Weekly Journal, became the center of attention when he published articles critical of the governor of New York, William Cosby. When Cosby was unsuccessful in silencing Zenger, first through threats of libel and then by more violent threats of burning his press, Cosby leveled sedition charges against him. Zenger was arrested and tried on July 29, 1735. Zenger was acquitted and the value of free speech in America was firmly entrenched. All this phoney-baloney "first amendment interpretation" bullsh*t was, and is, just the "smoke and mirrors" used to cloud the true meaning and intent of the First Amendment. As a result of these phoney-baloney "first amendment interpretations" the only thing the First Amendment doesn't protect is "criticism of the government". "Criticism of the government" is now labeled, by those in power, sedition, i.e. "attempts made by meetings or speeches, or by publications, to disturb the tranquility of the state." See those three forms of "sedition"? Now read the First Amendment. "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech [speeches], or of the press [publications]; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble [meetings], and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." [Emphasis and bracketed information added] The purpose and intent of the "freedom of speech, freedom of the press and the right of the people to peaceably assemble" clause of the First Amendment, was to protect individuals from being charged with "sedition", or "treason", when they criticized their servants in government.
  • Guest's picture
    lysander6 (not verified) 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    Excellent...
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    I've never been in prison, but I did spend 6 months in the Yavapai County (Arizona) jail. Four cells with 5 beds each held a minmum of 30, at times up to 50, women, which meant at any given time there were at least 10 sleeping on the floor. On average, about half of county inmates are in jail for victimless drug law violations, and what passes for a medical staff refuses to touch or otherwise help people who use drugs. Unless, of course, the drugs are the ones THEY hand out like candy at Halloween -- in 6 months, in one dorm in one jail in one county in one state, 3 inmates were taken to the hospital after being overdosed with psych meds by the so-called "medical staff." Two never came back.
  • livemike's picture
    livemike 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    This article could have been shorter if you just wrote "Nowhere where people are routinely raped with impunity is 'cushy' ".
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 31 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Please give a summary of the problems with Rothbard's thinking.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    Wow. The section, "The Goldilocks of Risk", was eyepopping. Too bad the gladhanders and grandstanders, i.e. politicians and their hangers-on, are visionary planners of society with little interest in slowing down long enough to understand the research. Also illuminating was the influence of BIS and the Basel Accords on American banks. A few observations about Maymin's essay: (1) Maymin wrote that the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision publishes "suggested bank guidelines", but later he added that under the Basel Accord's guidelines, "the bank that wishes to own $100 million of IBM stock may not unilaterally decide how much or how little risk capital to allocate for that ownership; it must conform to the regulatory requirements." So are they guidelines that obligate no one or are they requirements to which bankers must conform? Perhaps the trick to understanding the guildlines of the BIS and BCBS is that that they are analogous to recommendations published by the NCCUSL. If so, the BIS and BCBS would rely upon its members' several legislatures, e.g. Congress, to implement proposals, just as the NCCUSL doesn't publish laws but recommendations that may be codified by the legislatures of the provinces that Americans call states. (2) At the end Maymin claims that "[w]e have over 150,000 pages of federal regulations for various industries". I can't help wondering how he came up with that number. That would be 300 volumes with 500 pages per volume. So, is he counting both Statutes at Large and the United States Code? If so, then he must be double counting regulations. Another complication when trying to cite a neat and tidy number for the quantity of regulations is the set of many rules issued by various federal agencies. To paint a more precise picture, Maymin should cite one compilation or the other or both separately. Of course, if leftist bloggers and journalists investigate his claim and find it misleading, then Maymin will have discredited his own cause in proportion to the error, and it would hardly matter if the total number of pages turned out to be more than 150k. The goo-goos would probably trivialize that fact or neglect it altogether. In the meantime, some libertarian or conservative parrot will repeat the number 150k without doing the least bit of research to check it out. The claim could take on a life of its own, like some feminists' perennial shrill cry that women are paid just n% of what men earn, where n is always a good deal less than 100. (3) Maymin asked rhetorically, "[h]ow do banks work today?". His answer: "Basically, they hold leveraged portfolios of assets and decide how much risk capital to allocate to be able to keep holding those positions during times of distress." (Emphasis added.) If that's "basically" what he's teaching his students about banking, his students ought to plug their ears during class, for Maymin has a very superficial understanding. Keep in mind that "risk capital" is not a synonym for reserves. I suspect that his students' interests would be better served by not taking his class(es) at all, thereby saving several thousand dollars of tuition. Instead, they ought to burrow their way through Rothbard's A History of Money and Banking in the United States, which they can download for free. They could supplement their study with Modern Money Mechanics, first published by the FRB of Chicago in the 1960s and revised numerous times since then. It explains, among other things, the basics of deposit expansion and contraction under the system of fractional reserve banking established by Congress. This work, too, they can get for free. And of course, Mayim would have more time for statistics-driven research, which he seems to be good at. (4) If there were a free market in banking, then there'd be no banking cartels set up by government, no central banking, no sheltering of bankers from the vice of fractional reserve warehouse banking, and so on. Undoubtedly the bankers won't like this definition. Neither would the leftists. (5) Maymin wrote that "...no algorithm for calculating the required risk capital for given portfolios results in lower systemic risk"? C'mon, now, that doesn't even come close to passing the smell test. A cluster of warehouse banks each operating at or near 100% reserves would surely have low systemic risk. Of course, their dependency upon each other would be low, each bank would have few investments, and the regulators would have abandoned their old preoccupation, namely, meddling in banking in order to stimulate loans and investments by bankers. (6) The usual suspects will clamor for Mayim's "hypothetical regulatory agency", even though all experience shows that it's going to be a gigantic failure. The superagency toward which the world is heading will provide job opportunities for many law school grads and econ professors. And can you imagine the anxiety attacks of partners in big law firms if all those regulations were swept off the books without delay? What would they tell associates who've been racking up 2,000 to 3,000 billable hours per year in order to become partner and to enjoy the perks of crime that's organized under the color of law and protected by $45k/yr cops with degrees in criminal justice? Yes, regulation is like central planning; it amounts to politicians and bureaucrats exercising dominion over matter, physical stuff, that is nominally the property of others, i.e. business owners. Of course, even b-school books inform their readers that one of the purposes of regulation is to thwart competition. So business owners may not have the justification for complaint that at first appears to be the case. Anyhowm, why don't we claim that regulation is a little like Fascism, supposedly the merger of the corporation and the state? Regulation, you see, is the merger of corporate management with the state.
  • Robert Wallace's picture
    Robert Wallace 3 years 31 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    "We are a happy family" Fallacy of Composition. One out of a million.
  • Robert Wallace's picture
    Robert Wallace 3 years 31 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    I outgrew Rothbard's foolishness many years ago.
  • Robert Wallace's picture
    Robert Wallace 3 years 31 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    "Trying not to be rude, but when reading your column I have to assume that this whole libertarian thing is very new to you." If you don't know who I am, you haven't been one for very long.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Did anyone bother to go read HB569? They aren't "getting rid" of marriage, fercrisesake, they are simply renaming it, "domestic union", (A domestic union contracted under this chapter shall be the legal equivalent to marriage....), to side-step "the argument about gay marriage", nothing more. Well, whoopdeefrikindo! That means that the STATE will still be the 3rd and controlling party (god) in your "domestic union".
  • Jad Davis's picture
    Jad Davis 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Let's see if I'm clear on your position. You're requesting that we not "fret" for a man who's facing 4-15 years in prison for recording a policeman because you don't like his political positions? I'm curious, if this is the case, do you support the indefinite detention of "enemy combatants"? Surely you don't agree with the political positions of the Guantanamo bay detainees.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    "Many people seem to think that anarchists are proponents of violence, chaos, and destruction, that they are against all forms of order and organization, or that they are crazed nihilists who just want to blow everything up." Quick definitions from WordNet (nihilist) ▸ noun: someone who rejects all theories of morality or religious belief ▸ noun: an advocate of anarchism anarchist NOUN (1) 1. an advocate of anarchism; [syn:nihilist, syndicalist] ~ Wordnet 3.0 nihilist Specifically An adherent of nihilism; a member of a Russian secret society which aims at the overthrow of the existing order of things, social, political, and religious; a Russian anarchist or revolutionary reformer. See nihilism, 4. ~ Wordnik Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0: 71 Moby Thesaurus words for "nihilist": ...anarchist... Related Words for : nihilist anarchist, syndicalist ~ Dictionary.com Gee, I wonder why people would associate anarchists with nihilists? Hey, I know, maybe it's because so many dictionaries do! Are You An Anarchist? Definition of ANARCHIST ...2 : a person who believes in, advocates, or promotes anarchism or anarchy; especially : one who uses violent means to overthrow the established order ~ Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary, 11th Edition Yes, I know that there are some definitions that are more positive than that, and I know that it is probably a complete waste of my time telling some of you this, AGAIN, because you've already made up your mind, and you will choose to ignore this post. That's certainly your prerogative. This is directed at the individual who has not yet labeled himself, he needs to know that this is typically what he will be up against if he uses the word "anarchist " to describe himself.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    This is a very good article, a technical topic explained in layman's terms. It is unfortunate, though not surprising, that this type of analysis was not considered when Congress deliberated for the latest round of so-called financial regulation legislation. This analysis reinforces for me that regulation is really a form of central planning, so we should not be surprised when it fails to produce the stated objectives, or in fact works counter to them.
  • Bootstrapper's picture
    Bootstrapper 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    "Money flows toward power like water flows downhill." I think Kevin has it backwards. Political power gravitates to to those who have wealth. "Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes the laws." - Mayer Amschel Rothschild. The role money plays in civilised society is so fundamental that if you change the way it works, society and the economy will change to accommodate it. [url]http://p2pfoundation.net/Brakteaten_Money[/url]
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Ah, yes, Mr. Grigg had the rioting children dead to rights pretty fast. It so happened that another cryptocommie movement surfaced just recently and found mention at http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2011/03/group-calls-for-siege-of-fe... Note the grocery list of desires that are sure to appeal to a wide variety of half-educated fools: http://ampedstatus.org/network/about/
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    HAHAHAHAHA! Good Catch. Property is theft!??!? Kissing Proudhon a$$. I tracked down the multi colored pentagram and had a chuckle. Thank you for that. TPTB have never seen a subversive movement they did not like. http://freedominourtime.blogspot.com/2011/02/when-tax-feeders-revolt.html
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Are You A Closeted Commie? Are You A Pseudanarchist? The Answers May Not Suprise [sic] You! Let's see now. At NYMAA there's little, or no, mention of the right to private property. Nevertheless, we have the following: "Are you a member of a club or sports team or any other voluntary organization where decisions are not imposed by one leader but made on the basis of general consent?" It's not hard to figure out what that means. NYMAA is pandering to thin-skinned babies who can't tolerate being told what to do, i.e. being given instructions, after having having voluntarily affiliated their selves with a sports team, a club, a business, a sailing crew, etc. Now, anyone who's ever been part of an unsuccessful sports team, business, etc. knows the price of wishwashy leadership. And, of course, communism is nothing if not a home for thin-skinned babies who don't like being told what to do. Oh, the irony. Now, down the lefthand side of NYMAA's site there are a number of carefully chosen links. Following one got me very quickly to... http://libcom.org/. They helpfully provide you with a guide to their ideology. See the star, half black and half red. The black side is for the tactic of pretending to be anarchists and working to sweep aside current governments, mainly through mobocracy. The rioting children in Wisconsin are a good example of mobocracy. The red side of the star is for communism, which is the antithesis of anarchism. Another link at NYMAA takes the clicker to the New York City Branch of the Industrial Workers of the World, http://wobblycity.wordpress.com/. Yep, commies once again. In fact, the IWW has it's headquarters within walking distance of Lakeview. http://www.iww.org/en/headquarters The prosecution rests.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Fret not for this artist. He's a leftwing turd, as you can see at http://www.c-drew.com/blog/2011/02/28/1398/. In fact, for years he's been trying to foment this confrontation with his fellow statists. http://www.copblock.org/1927/is-illinois-taking-an-artist-to-trial-to-si...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    "Waivers? We ain't got no waivers. We don't need no waivers. I don't have to show you any stinking waivers!" ;)
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    G'day ProtoGoth, "..a proven source of energy...", young goth? You may want to research that statement. Here are a couple of examples; and as you can see from the first one, it doesn't have to be a "common" occurrence to effect an awful lot of people. Explosion at Chernobyl On April 26, 1986, a nuclear reactor exploded and caught fire at Chernobyl in Ukraine, spewing 200 times more radiation into the air than the 1945 Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings combined. To date, Chernobyl is the worst accident in the history of nuclear power. More than 600,000 workers called "liquidators"--without proper equipment or training--extinguished the fire and constructed a cement tomb around the reactor. In all, an estimated 17.5 million people suffered serious radiation exposure, 2.5 million of them children. The Ukraine Ministry of Health estimates that 125,000 people have died in Ukraine alone as a result of radiation effects; almost all liquidators are seriously ill or dead. Thyroid (throat) cancer alone is 79 times more prevalent since the accident. A few million people--many too poor to move--still live in the contaminated zone and experience daily exposure to low-dose radiation, eating radioactive meat and crops, and drinking contaminated water and milk. Many people suffer from what has been called "Chernobyl AIDS"--they're chronically sick because their immune, or disease-fighting, systems can't ward off disease. (Source: http://tinyurl.com/68mqxht) _________________________________________________________________________________________ The Downside * It’s expensive low carbon power ($0.9-$0.10/kWh delivered) compared to $0.025-$0.030 for end-use efficiency improvements; $0.06-$0.07 for wind; and $0.026-$0.04 for recovered heat co-generation) * Long gestation/construction period and huge capital costs increase risk of market obsolescence and “stranded costs” (i.e., costs that cannot reasonably be recovered by continuing to operate the plant for its planned life) * Subject to infrequent, but prolonged and costly planned and unplanned shutdowns (a recent study by the Union of Concerned Scientists documents 12 year-plus reactor outages since 1995, 11 of them “safety-related) * Large “lumpy” increments of nuclear capacity require expensive overall power system excess capacity to ensure grid reliability * Any nuclear power investment may at any moment become hostage to the conduct of the worst performer—or even the average performer on a bad day—in the event of a reactor accident or near-accident anywhere on the globe * No licensed path (yet) to opening first longterm geologic repository for safely isolating spent fuel, and nuclear “renaissance” will require either additional expensive and hard-to-establish geologic repositories, or even more expensive and hazardous spent-fuel reprocessing * Nuclear security concerns and risks are heightened in an age of transnational terrorism * Acute proliferation concerns arise if advanced fuel cycles are used, or if uranium enrichment capability spreads to additional countries that are not already nuclear weapon states * All stages of the nuclear fuel cycle involve potentially harmful, or in some cases disastrous environmental impacts (e.g., Chernobyl), requiring continuous and vigorous regulation, with significant financial penalties exacted for poor environmental and safety performance to ensure compliance * Huge heat dissipation requirements demand either large evaporative cooling withdrawals and/or thermal discharges into already overburdened lakes and rivers, or massive and expensive fan-driven air-cooling towers * Climate change in the direction of hotter, drier summers spells trouble for reactors that rely primarily on cheaper once-through or evaporative water cooling * Offer little prospect of increasing “energy independence,” as the bulk of world uranium resources are located outside the United States (Source: http://tinyurl.com/2urk5h)
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 31 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    G'day rita, After talking with one of the engineers who worked at Rancho Seco I would have to agree with you. "Only its position near the top of the corporate welfare rolls enables the nuclear industry to hang on." ~ Pittsburgh Post-Gazette "Government subsidies to the nuclear power industry over the past fifty years have been so large in proportion to the value of the energy produced that in some cases it would have cost taxpayers less to simply buy kilowatts on the open market and give them away, according to a February 2011 report by the Union of Concerned Scientists." ~ Nuclear Power Subsidies: The Gift that Keeps on Taking
  • Guest's picture
    ProtoGoth (not verified) 3 years 32 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Clearly we must abandon a proven source of energy since we can't be sure whether or not nuclear reactors can withstand a FREAKIN' 8.9 earthquake! Those are just so common that it's not worth investing in nuclear any further.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 32 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    If and when the government requires me to buy into my employers' $1000 deductible "health plan," I will write my own waiver by quitting my job.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 32 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Yet another reason, as if we needed any more reasons, to oppose the use of nuclear energy.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 32 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.” ~ Margaret Thatcher
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 32 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    If Winslow T. Wheeler "were presiding over this mess", he just might be an acquintance, friend, or ally of Dov S. Zakheim, an ugly, oily Jew who appeared on the cover of CFO magazine during the first term of Bush I. At the time Dov was comptroller at the DoD, and then, too, the DoD was experiencing accounting irregularities, just as any intelligent person should be able to predict would be the case under military communism. Sure enough, Dov's fingerprints are all over Reagan's presidency; then, too, he was involved with the DoD. It just so happened that between stints at the DoD, Dov helped to write PNAC's screed for imperialism and warmongering, Rebuilding America's Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources For a New Century. It's a fascinating outline of how the USA might be turned into something like the republic of Star Wars, though not necessarily with light sabres or with TIE fighters that have enourmous blind spots that no test pilot would tolerate. (Perhaps the absurd designs of those fighters are evidence of the underappreciated humor of George Lucas. In a Star Wars video game that came out in the 1990s, the game programmers named a company that made TIE Fighters, no doubt for profit in that world, too.) Anyhow, this ought to prompt a few questions. "Who does Dov work for now? How does that business obtain its revenues?" I suspect that the answer to the first is Booz Allen Hamilton. As you can see, Booz Allen Hamilton is grease on the skids of crony capitalism. Sure enough, BAH knows how to pander to rabble and do-goodniks with the usual nostrums and platitudes about service to the community: "Bettering our world Beyond management and technology consulting, Booz Allen takes its role as good corporate citizen very seriously. Bettering our world is part of the fabric of the firm—whether through volunteerism, pro bono engagements, fundraising, corporate philanthropy, or activating the business community through service to the community—globally and locally." Now, who can doubt that the congenial management and owners of BAH would employ hitmen to stop anyone and everyone who wants to wreck their lucrative business?
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 32 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Hello Liberal in Lakeview, Just curious, why would you link to something from a troll calling him or her self "BaphometRex666", which in turn links to the Sinagogue of Satan website?
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 32 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    "New York Man Faces Five Years in Jail for ‘Linking’ to Online Videos" This title and certain things withing the article are very misleading. The title should have read, "New York Man Faces Five Years in Jail for ‘Linking’ to Online Bootlegged Videos" The article begins with this warning, "You may want to think twice the next time you share a link to your favorite video." To state this a little more truthfully, "You may want to think twice the next time you share a link to your favorite bootlegged video." We read further on in this article, "The advocacy group Demand Progress has claimed that McCarthy never reproduced copyrighted material, and that his website simply linked to other sites." What Demand Progress seems to have 'inadvertently' left unsaid was the fact that Brian McCarthy was evidently "simply linking" to sites that were illegally reproducing (and/or distributing) copyrighted material.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 32 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Reaganism. So predictable. How many years will it take the author, John Hayward, to understand that he has impeached military communism? "like all socialist schemes, it relies entirely on the compulsive force of law" "Every central planning scheme drives up costs and limits services." "...the cost of forcing compliance with a government mandate [e.g. military communism] will always cause a product or service to end up with a higher price than it would have commanded in a competitive free market" Central planning, compulsion, limiting services, and a higher price, indeed. And these are exactly what flagwaving shills for military communism want when they think about investing in businesses that sell stuff that nobody would buy voluntarily with their own money. Examples of military communism for profit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Martin_F-35_Lightning_II http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M1A2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KC-X Now, Human Events is a Reaganist outfit. Hayward may need a little help to think it through even though he's got his free market talking points memorized very well.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 32 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    Morpheus: You take the blue pill, the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill, you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.... Remember, all I'm offering is the truth, nothing more....[1] The Blue Pill: To Vote Is To Choose Your Masters The Red Pill: If one possesses the political right to vote, it means that he has already chosen his master. It's not whether a man votes, or not, it's whether he is "entitled" to vote, i.e. has been given the political "right" to vote, or not, that determines who, or what, his master is. Only those individuals who have voluntarily "submitted themselves to the dominion of [the] government" (citizens/subjects[2]) have a "just claim" to that "entitlement". A man is none the less a slave because he is allowed [entitled] to choose a new master once in a term of years. ~ Lysander Spooner ____________________________________________________________ [1] The terms redpill and its opposite, bluepill, are pop culture terms that have become a common symbol for the choice between the blissful ignorance of illusion (blue) and embracing the sometimes[sic] painful truth of reality (red). ~ Wikipedia [2] Subject. ...Men in free governments are subjects as well as citizens; as citizens they enjoy [political/civil] rights and franchises; as subjects they are bound to obey the laws. Swiss Nat. Ins. Co. v. Miller, 267 U.S. 42, 45 S.Ct. 213, 214, 69 L.Ed. 504 (Source: Black's Law Dictionary, Sixth Edition (c.1991), page 1425 [Bracketed information & emphasis added] See that word "franchises" in the definition directly above? Disenfranchisement. ...In a more popular sense, the taking away of the elective franchise (that is, the right of voting in public elections) from any citizen or class of citizens. ~ Ibid., page 468
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 32 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    If anyone's interested, I've written an article for another website about these prison rape pieces that I think says something important: http://www.avoiceformen.com/2011/03/11/the-rape-of-mankind/ I appreciate the assistant editors publishing these other articles at STR, as they were a direct inspiration for what I wrote.