Recent comments

  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Ah, yes, Mr. Grigg had the rioting children dead to rights pretty fast. It so happened that another cryptocommie movement surfaced just recently and found mention at http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2011/03/group-calls-for-siege-of-fe... Note the grocery list of desires that are sure to appeal to a wide variety of half-educated fools: http://ampedstatus.org/network/about/
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    HAHAHAHAHA! Good Catch. Property is theft!??!? Kissing Proudhon a$$. I tracked down the multi colored pentagram and had a chuckle. Thank you for that. TPTB have never seen a subversive movement they did not like. http://freedominourtime.blogspot.com/2011/02/when-tax-feeders-revolt.html
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Are You A Closeted Commie? Are You A Pseudanarchist? The Answers May Not Suprise [sic] You! Let's see now. At NYMAA there's little, or no, mention of the right to private property. Nevertheless, we have the following: "Are you a member of a club or sports team or any other voluntary organization where decisions are not imposed by one leader but made on the basis of general consent?" It's not hard to figure out what that means. NYMAA is pandering to thin-skinned babies who can't tolerate being told what to do, i.e. being given instructions, after having having voluntarily affiliated their selves with a sports team, a club, a business, a sailing crew, etc. Now, anyone who's ever been part of an unsuccessful sports team, business, etc. knows the price of wishwashy leadership. And, of course, communism is nothing if not a home for thin-skinned babies who don't like being told what to do. Oh, the irony. Now, down the lefthand side of NYMAA's site there are a number of carefully chosen links. Following one got me very quickly to... http://libcom.org/. They helpfully provide you with a guide to their ideology. See the star, half black and half red. The black side is for the tactic of pretending to be anarchists and working to sweep aside current governments, mainly through mobocracy. The rioting children in Wisconsin are a good example of mobocracy. The red side of the star is for communism, which is the antithesis of anarchism. Another link at NYMAA takes the clicker to the New York City Branch of the Industrial Workers of the World, http://wobblycity.wordpress.com/. Yep, commies once again. In fact, the IWW has it's headquarters within walking distance of Lakeview. http://www.iww.org/en/headquarters The prosecution rests.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    Fret not for this artist. He's a leftwing turd, as you can see at http://www.c-drew.com/blog/2011/02/28/1398/. In fact, for years he's been trying to foment this confrontation with his fellow statists. http://www.copblock.org/1927/is-illinois-taking-an-artist-to-trial-to-si...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 28 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    "Waivers? We ain't got no waivers. We don't need no waivers. I don't have to show you any stinking waivers!" ;)
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    G'day ProtoGoth, "..a proven source of energy...", young goth? You may want to research that statement. Here are a couple of examples; and as you can see from the first one, it doesn't have to be a "common" occurrence to effect an awful lot of people. Explosion at Chernobyl On April 26, 1986, a nuclear reactor exploded and caught fire at Chernobyl in Ukraine, spewing 200 times more radiation into the air than the 1945 Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings combined. To date, Chernobyl is the worst accident in the history of nuclear power. More than 600,000 workers called "liquidators"--without proper equipment or training--extinguished the fire and constructed a cement tomb around the reactor. In all, an estimated 17.5 million people suffered serious radiation exposure, 2.5 million of them children. The Ukraine Ministry of Health estimates that 125,000 people have died in Ukraine alone as a result of radiation effects; almost all liquidators are seriously ill or dead. Thyroid (throat) cancer alone is 79 times more prevalent since the accident. A few million people--many too poor to move--still live in the contaminated zone and experience daily exposure to low-dose radiation, eating radioactive meat and crops, and drinking contaminated water and milk. Many people suffer from what has been called "Chernobyl AIDS"--they're chronically sick because their immune, or disease-fighting, systems can't ward off disease. (Source: http://tinyurl.com/68mqxht) _________________________________________________________________________________________ The Downside * It’s expensive low carbon power ($0.9-$0.10/kWh delivered) compared to $0.025-$0.030 for end-use efficiency improvements; $0.06-$0.07 for wind; and $0.026-$0.04 for recovered heat co-generation) * Long gestation/construction period and huge capital costs increase risk of market obsolescence and “stranded costs” (i.e., costs that cannot reasonably be recovered by continuing to operate the plant for its planned life) * Subject to infrequent, but prolonged and costly planned and unplanned shutdowns (a recent study by the Union of Concerned Scientists documents 12 year-plus reactor outages since 1995, 11 of them “safety-related) * Large “lumpy” increments of nuclear capacity require expensive overall power system excess capacity to ensure grid reliability * Any nuclear power investment may at any moment become hostage to the conduct of the worst performer—or even the average performer on a bad day—in the event of a reactor accident or near-accident anywhere on the globe * No licensed path (yet) to opening first longterm geologic repository for safely isolating spent fuel, and nuclear “renaissance” will require either additional expensive and hard-to-establish geologic repositories, or even more expensive and hazardous spent-fuel reprocessing * Nuclear security concerns and risks are heightened in an age of transnational terrorism * Acute proliferation concerns arise if advanced fuel cycles are used, or if uranium enrichment capability spreads to additional countries that are not already nuclear weapon states * All stages of the nuclear fuel cycle involve potentially harmful, or in some cases disastrous environmental impacts (e.g., Chernobyl), requiring continuous and vigorous regulation, with significant financial penalties exacted for poor environmental and safety performance to ensure compliance * Huge heat dissipation requirements demand either large evaporative cooling withdrawals and/or thermal discharges into already overburdened lakes and rivers, or massive and expensive fan-driven air-cooling towers * Climate change in the direction of hotter, drier summers spells trouble for reactors that rely primarily on cheaper once-through or evaporative water cooling * Offer little prospect of increasing “energy independence,” as the bulk of world uranium resources are located outside the United States (Source: http://tinyurl.com/2urk5h)
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    G'day rita, After talking with one of the engineers who worked at Rancho Seco I would have to agree with you. "Only its position near the top of the corporate welfare rolls enables the nuclear industry to hang on." ~ Pittsburgh Post-Gazette "Government subsidies to the nuclear power industry over the past fifty years have been so large in proportion to the value of the energy produced that in some cases it would have cost taxpayers less to simply buy kilowatts on the open market and give them away, according to a February 2011 report by the Union of Concerned Scientists." ~ Nuclear Power Subsidies: The Gift that Keeps on Taking
  • Guest's picture
    ProtoGoth (not verified) 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Clearly we must abandon a proven source of energy since we can't be sure whether or not nuclear reactors can withstand a FREAKIN' 8.9 earthquake! Those are just so common that it's not worth investing in nuclear any further.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 28 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    If and when the government requires me to buy into my employers' $1000 deductible "health plan," I will write my own waiver by quitting my job.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Yet another reason, as if we needed any more reasons, to oppose the use of nuclear energy.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 28 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.” ~ Margaret Thatcher
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    If Winslow T. Wheeler "were presiding over this mess", he just might be an acquintance, friend, or ally of Dov S. Zakheim, an ugly, oily Jew who appeared on the cover of CFO magazine during the first term of Bush I. At the time Dov was comptroller at the DoD, and then, too, the DoD was experiencing accounting irregularities, just as any intelligent person should be able to predict would be the case under military communism. Sure enough, Dov's fingerprints are all over Reagan's presidency; then, too, he was involved with the DoD. It just so happened that between stints at the DoD, Dov helped to write PNAC's screed for imperialism and warmongering, Rebuilding America's Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources For a New Century. It's a fascinating outline of how the USA might be turned into something like the republic of Star Wars, though not necessarily with light sabres or with TIE fighters that have enourmous blind spots that no test pilot would tolerate. (Perhaps the absurd designs of those fighters are evidence of the underappreciated humor of George Lucas. In a Star Wars video game that came out in the 1990s, the game programmers named a company that made TIE Fighters, no doubt for profit in that world, too.) Anyhow, this ought to prompt a few questions. "Who does Dov work for now? How does that business obtain its revenues?" I suspect that the answer to the first is Booz Allen Hamilton. As you can see, Booz Allen Hamilton is grease on the skids of crony capitalism. Sure enough, BAH knows how to pander to rabble and do-goodniks with the usual nostrums and platitudes about service to the community: "Bettering our world Beyond management and technology consulting, Booz Allen takes its role as good corporate citizen very seriously. Bettering our world is part of the fabric of the firm—whether through volunteerism, pro bono engagements, fundraising, corporate philanthropy, or activating the business community through service to the community—globally and locally." Now, who can doubt that the congenial management and owners of BAH would employ hitmen to stop anyone and everyone who wants to wreck their lucrative business?
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 28 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    Hello Liberal in Lakeview, Just curious, why would you link to something from a troll calling him or her self "BaphometRex666", which in turn links to the Sinagogue of Satan website?
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    "New York Man Faces Five Years in Jail for ‘Linking’ to Online Videos" This title and certain things withing the article are very misleading. The title should have read, "New York Man Faces Five Years in Jail for ‘Linking’ to Online Bootlegged Videos" The article begins with this warning, "You may want to think twice the next time you share a link to your favorite video." To state this a little more truthfully, "You may want to think twice the next time you share a link to your favorite bootlegged video." We read further on in this article, "The advocacy group Demand Progress has claimed that McCarthy never reproduced copyrighted material, and that his website simply linked to other sites." What Demand Progress seems to have 'inadvertently' left unsaid was the fact that Brian McCarthy was evidently "simply linking" to sites that were illegally reproducing (and/or distributing) copyrighted material.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 29 weeks ago
    Waivers For Everyone
    Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Reaganism. So predictable. How many years will it take the author, John Hayward, to understand that he has impeached military communism? "like all socialist schemes, it relies entirely on the compulsive force of law" "Every central planning scheme drives up costs and limits services." "...the cost of forcing compliance with a government mandate [e.g. military communism] will always cause a product or service to end up with a higher price than it would have commanded in a competitive free market" Central planning, compulsion, limiting services, and a higher price, indeed. And these are exactly what flagwaving shills for military communism want when they think about investing in businesses that sell stuff that nobody would buy voluntarily with their own money. Examples of military communism for profit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Martin_F-35_Lightning_II http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M1A2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KC-X Now, Human Events is a Reaganist outfit. Hayward may need a little help to think it through even though he's got his free market talking points memorized very well.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    Morpheus: You take the blue pill, the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill, you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.... Remember, all I'm offering is the truth, nothing more....[1] The Blue Pill: To Vote Is To Choose Your Masters The Red Pill: If one possesses the political right to vote, it means that he has already chosen his master. It's not whether a man votes, or not, it's whether he is "entitled" to vote, i.e. has been given the political "right" to vote, or not, that determines who, or what, his master is. Only those individuals who have voluntarily "submitted themselves to the dominion of [the] government" (citizens/subjects[2]) have a "just claim" to that "entitlement". A man is none the less a slave because he is allowed [entitled] to choose a new master once in a term of years. ~ Lysander Spooner ____________________________________________________________ [1] The terms redpill and its opposite, bluepill, are pop culture terms that have become a common symbol for the choice between the blissful ignorance of illusion (blue) and embracing the sometimes[sic] painful truth of reality (red). ~ Wikipedia [2] Subject. ...Men in free governments are subjects as well as citizens; as citizens they enjoy [political/civil] rights and franchises; as subjects they are bound to obey the laws. Swiss Nat. Ins. Co. v. Miller, 267 U.S. 42, 45 S.Ct. 213, 214, 69 L.Ed. 504 (Source: Black's Law Dictionary, Sixth Edition (c.1991), page 1425 [Bracketed information & emphasis added] See that word "franchises" in the definition directly above? Disenfranchisement. ...In a more popular sense, the taking away of the elective franchise (that is, the right of voting in public elections) from any citizen or class of citizens. ~ Ibid., page 468
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    If anyone's interested, I've written an article for another website about these prison rape pieces that I think says something important: http://www.avoiceformen.com/2011/03/11/the-rape-of-mankind/ I appreciate the assistant editors publishing these other articles at STR, as they were a direct inspiration for what I wrote.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    www.disinfo.com: An ironic URL, given the misleading title of the article. Leftists. So predictable. Also, at the bottom of page: "Copyright 2011 The Disinformation Company Ltd." What a sense of humor they have! Thanks for posting the corrective to the misleading headline, which ought not to have been repeated at STR.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    But Rita, "Homeland Security is an emerging field that includes many applications including emergency preparedness and response for natural disasters and terrorism, border patrol, security management, intelligence and many other exciting careers." (Emphasis added.) "Get Trained & Start Working in Just a Few Months!" "DON'T WAIT...CALL NOW!" http://www.chooseicdccollege.com/System/LandingPages/Online_HLS_AllOnlin... "ICDC College is accredited by the ACCSC."
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    And here in the late, great, "Land of the Free," buildings like this crumble, empty, while human beings live under bridges.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    And here we thought the DHS was merely concerned with protecting us from Spanish-speaking day laborers and purveyors of drug paraphernalia . . .
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    I'd been wondering if Bradley Manning had any family, and had concluded that he must be an orphan. If that were me sitting in that cell, guilty or innocent, my parents would have long ago been sitting on the White House steps; if it were one of my children, my parents and I would all be there.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Derek Henson
    "Utah Approves Gold & Silver Coins As Currency" Really? "House Bill 317 was introduced by state Rep. Brad Galvez (R) last week, and passed the House by a vote of 47-26. It will now head to the state Senate for a vote." Not YET, it hasn't, apparently. "The Utah House of Representatives has approved a bill[sic] that allowing gold and silver coins to be used as currency, though unlike similar bills in other states, it doesn’t force anyone to accept gold or silver as legal tender." Does anyone here know if any of the several STATES have approved a bill that "forces" their members to accept gold or silver as legal tender?
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago
    Civility and Democracy
    Web link Michael Kleen
    G'day Paul, Do you truly believe, as you seem to indicate, that it is only the fear of being shot, the fear of reprisal, that makes men deal with each other civilly, i.e. "in a polite way, especially without being friendly"? Or is it because we are social beings[1] by nature? And, do we, (well, most of us anyway), not discover, at an early age, hopefully, that when we are antisocial, i.e. treat each other with incivility, that we soon have few, or no, good companions? _______________________________________________________________________________ [1] SO'CIAL, a. [L. socialis, from socius, companion.] ...4. Disposed to unite in society. Man is a social being. ~ Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 29 weeks ago
    Civility and Democracy
    Web link Michael Kleen
    I don't buy it. I don't think civility was ever very popular for the mass of humanity. The only times and places it was, was within the armed class ("an armed society is a polite society") because acting otherwise would be a good way to end up dead the next morning via a duel. And, it was preserved in the English upper classes as a way to separate themselves from the hoi polloi. And civility of course has nothing whatever to do with the Tucson shootings.
  • Evan's picture
    Evan 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    What a tool.
  • Melinda L. Secor's picture
    Melinda L. Secor 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    I surely hope so....it would do my heart good to see Americans shake their apathy and stand up for something. It irks me that that most just line up like sheep for each new bit of degradation inflicted by the state....and each one done with money lifted from their own pockets.
  • Michael Kleen's picture
    Michael Kleen 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    These are all some very good observations, and I agree that pragmatism can be taken too far. That's why it should be practiced, like most other things, in moderation.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    Well said.
  • Semmes's picture
    Semmes 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    I do not trust any human being to issue a monetary unit. It will always become corrupt over time. That is why gold and silver have always been money. It has to be dug out of the ground, refined and minted. It can be tested for weight and purity by even the simplest of people. It can’t be printed ad infinitum. If men were angles we wouldn’t need gold and silver.Gold and Silver are not a perfect solution. AS usual Government (evil men) grant special licenses and privileges to other evil men to manipulate, monopolize and impede the market flow of money. This type of activity will need to be viewed by all men as akin to murder and punished at the end of a rope or barrel of a gun. Gold and Silver are not perfect but vastly superior to Utopian pipe dream of fiat currency.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    “Assange was arrested in Britain on December 7th on an international warrant issued by a Swedish prosecutor who wanted to question him over four separate allegations of sexual assault made by the two women relating to incidents in August 2010.” This reminds me of an old joke. Two nuns on the way to church decided to take a shortcut through the nearby woods. Half way there a man jumped out of the bushes and raped them both. When they reached the church door, sometime later, one nun turns to the other and asks, “How are we going to explain being raped TWICE? The other nun asks, “What do you mean TWICE?” The first nun smiles slyly, and says, “Well, we're going back that way, aren't we?”
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    "A man is none the less a slave because he is allowed to choose a new master once in a term of years. Neither are a people any the less slaves because permitted periodically to choose new masters." ~ No Treason – The Constitution of No Authority (1867-1870) by Lysander Spooner
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    And we despise you right back Vox.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    See my article, Cops. What good are they?
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    This will mean war, if they keep pushing it.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Note the Eastern need to "save face". Same thing, really. And FDR got us into war by cutting off the oil supplies of the Japanese, which was a slap in the face, shaming them. At least, one could make that argument...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Thank you very much for the positive feedback, Sharon Secor. Agreed, "shameful, sad, but true."
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    I can see both sides of this argument. A fine example is what is going on with concealed carry of firearms. Originally only Vermont allowed concealed carry (CC) with no need for permits. At that time I believe only Washington state allowed CC with permits. But then the dam broke for some reason after Florida adopted CC with permits. By now we have about 40 states with "shall issue" CC laws. The interesting thing is that permitless CC is now starting to spread. At this point Vermont, Alaska, Arizona and Wyoming have this type of law, and several other states are considering it. See the animated graphic here: https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Shall_issue#Shall-Issue Now, the ideological position is clearly for permitless CC, and CC requiring a permit is an imposition. Yet I believe the current spread of permitless CC would not be occurring without the intermediate stage first. I think the first stage got people used to the idea of a significant percentage of people walking around armed. After that took place and mayhem did not occur, it allowed further questioning, such as, "Should I really need permission from a bureaucrat to protect my family?" And people are getting it; they are realizing the answer is no. So these events support the pragmatic position (also because the whole thing was done within the system, legislatively). Yet, pragmatism can indeed be taken too far. NRA has become infamous among many gun owners for lobbying in OPPOSITION to the spread of permitless CC. I suppose their rationale was a desire not to appear too radical among the legislators they deal with every day. But it's one thing to remain uninvolved in the permitless battles, another thing entirely to oppose them and kill their chance for passage. They have gone down that slippery slope. If one uses the pragmatic approach, it's important to keep the ideal firmly in mind at all times, and recognize when one is on the boundary of being too pragmatic.
  • J3rBear's picture
    J3rBear 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    It's also important to remember that pragmatism can be a tempting tool that can easily drag one away from rational principles. It is the cliche "slippery slope". We live in a world of moral relativism precisely because people simple do what is practical or what works. And of course, one can substantiate any action by pointing out it's practicalities or effects. I'm very wary of arguments such as the one made above.
  • buzaman's picture
    buzaman 3 years 29 weeks ago
    Complete Liberty
    Web link Sharon Secor
    Wes's podcast is great. I highly recommend it. The group discussions he has are great. Many of the shows include Brett Veinotte (school sucks podcast) and Daniel Lakemacher (www.warisimmoral.com) as well as a few other people who really round out the show. Each podcast includes detailed show notes (links, youtube videos, etc.) on the podcast page. The Non-Violent Communication work he's been doing over the last 5-7 shows have been fantastic and very educational.
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Melinda... a lot of locals are talking about this right now. I don't know if we're going to see any action, but I told Dave to let me know if anybody puts together a Marfa-like protest, because I'll assist in any way possible. I think we should write to the city counsel and the chamber of commerse members, as well as the bigger chain stores in the area, letting them know that people on our side are going to start traveling up the mountain to shop, even though it is further away, since out local officials refuse to do what is right and stand up to the feds. You may want to post that bit of info about traveling the local roads with their equipment on Dave in the Can's blog, he's been talking about the issue, too. Julie who is suing the ranch is also interested. Suverans2... I always enjoy reading your comments on STR wherever they are and on whatever subject you deem worthy of your well written and researched response. For a multitude of reasons, the American people have decided that their rights are no longer worth the time and effort to assert. Shameful, sad, but true. We pay for this shit, we submit to this shit, accepting such treatment from people whose salaries we pay through the taxes we pay. If enough people refused to pay, submit, accept it simply would not happen.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Wonderful insight and excellent point Bob. It makes me wonder why the Eastern peoples/philosophies that stress the importance of being humble seem to end up with the most tyrannical states and despots? Are humble people easier to exploit? I really don't know. Thanks for the inspiring article.
  • wkmac's picture
    wkmac 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    This is why I think war and military empire should be a front burner issue. Not only is it an issue that defies the typical left/right construct that to me is nothing but a chinese finger trap but it is war that causes so many imbalances in society that both the right and left often rail about in regards to overreaching gov't. One side screams about poverty and the other side screams about paying for it while neither ever consider the harm done of extracting monetized labor out of the local economy and via central planning giving it to the big boys to play with. The very ill they both speak of have their root in the State itself and yet both look to the state to fix it all. Both fear anti-statism in that abandoning the State will allow the otherside to gain power and win the day. Opposition to war and empire IMO is a training wheels issue so we can learn how to work with yet respect each other without the chinese fingertrap. From an anti-statist pragmatist POV, it just seems on so many levels to address effects that both the the right and left don't like yet creates further problems in society. I'm not saying for those who think the Federal Reserve is the problem or the security state is troubling should drop all they are doing and refocus but instead if you drill down to the heart of statism and look at it's core, you'll find good people on both the so-called left and right who oppose it and one area that I see more and more a growing consensus is war and the military state. Also pulling out $1 trillion plus annually from local economies to fund this venture will cause other consequences across society and what if that amount was just cut in half, just in economics what would the benefits be if $500 billion were either not borrowed from future generations or left to work in local economies? Could local economics improve thus the pressures on safety net programs lessen making both those on the left concerned with poverty growth happy while those on the right have less taken from their pocket? One does have to ask the question, are we being idealogues to achieve a collaspe of the whole thing or are we afraid to go piecemeal because if things starts to turn to the positive and get better, a comfort zone is reached, our idea of perfection will be put aside andthe state to lesser degree will live on for another day? On an evolutionary scale, are we ready to evolve away for such organized, centralized, heirarchial societies to begin with? On that level, are pragmatic steps the better way to go and have a 1000 year vision instead of wanting it for ourselves next week? I like next week too but at some point the pragmatic wins need to happen. I'm not one for voting but Ron Paul has forced a very different conversation to enter the landscape and people who onced thought themselves opposites are now shoulder to shoulder on the battle fronts they agree. And inside that, names like Proudhon, Tucker, Spooner and Rothbard are gaining wider audience than they once had along with Locke, Bastiat, Mises Garrett and Mencken. Paleo is seen as a positive and Neo is becoming the negative. Classical left is being discussed for it's free market traditions more than it's typical "Matrix" creations. We can't ignore how important this has been to the larger discussion and the pragmatist idea is worthy of some consideration at some level. However, being a realist or is that pragmatist, I'm not holding my breathe that we idealogues are just going to quietly change overnight either! LOL! Good article and good ideas to ponder. Very timely IMO.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    AMENDMENT IV [1791] The right of the people to be secure in their persons, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. Guess your government doesn't deem using portable/mobile backscatter porn-scanners on its 14th Amendment "citizens" as, Unreasonable. Irrational; foolish; unwise; absurd; silly; preposterous; senseless; [or] stupid. Southern State Lines Co. v. Public Service Commission, 135 Kan. 657, 11 P.2d 985, 987. (Source: Black's Law Dictionary, Sixth Edition (c.1991), page 1538) Well, it's either that or 14th Amendment citizens aren't protected by the Fourth Amendment. Take your choice. ;)
  • Melinda L. Secor's picture
    Melinda L. Secor 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Sharon Secor
    You know, I've read a bunch of news reports over the past few days about this issue, and all state that DHS considered mobile backscatter porno-scanners, but deny that they are using them. Meanwhile....I have seen two of them in use here in Texas. We saw Homeland Security using one at a highway weigh-station for trucks, and those bastards, with no notification, consent or probable cause, irradiated my children as we passed through the local gestapo (border patrol) checkpoint on the way to a medical appointment. The machine was pretty much concealed at the end of the building as we drove through...we didn't see it until the little "scanning" light flashed. I am frothing too. And....Sherri....I didn't mention did I, that Gary saw that same truck traveling the local roads...the one we live on specifically. Perhaps randomly scanning traffic on the roads or people's homes? But still, DHS says they thought about it....but dismissed the idea. So yes....the danger of being scanned on the sidewalks and football games is real....in fact....it is already here, despite the outright lies fed to the sheeple.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago
    Natural Law
    Web link Don Stacy
    In a true[1] republic “...the rule of law limits the authority of men exercising governmental power.” Quod prius est verius est; et quod prius est tempore potius est jure. What is first is truest; and what comes first in time, is best in law. Co. Litt. 347. ~ Bouvier's 1856 Law Dictionary [Emphasis added] Therefore, the Supreme Law of the Land is the Law of Nature, the Natural Law of Man. NATURAL LAW. The rule and dictate of right reason, showing the moral deformity or moral necessity there is in any act, according to a reasonable nature. Tayl. Civil Law, 99. ~ A Dictionary of the Law (Black's 1st c.1891), page 801 Law of nature, is a rule of conduct arising out of the natural relations of human beings established by the Creator, and existing prior to any positive precept. Thus it is a law of nature, that one man should not injure another, and murder and fraud would be crimes, independent of any prohibition from a supreme power. ~ Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language [Emphasis added] This law of nature, being coeval[2] with mankind and dictated by God himself, is of course superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe in all countries, and at all times: no human laws are of any validity, if contrary to this; and such of them as are valid derive all their force, and all their authority, mediately or immediately, from this original. ~ 1 W. Blackstone, Commentaries at 41 [Emphasis added] The law of nature is superior in obligation to any other. It is binding in all countries and at all times. No human laws are valid if opposed to this, and all which are binding derive their authority either directly or indirectly from it. ~ Institutes of American Law by John Bouvier, 1851, Part I, Title II, No. 9 [Emphasis added] [The natural] law is the paramount law, and the same law, over all the world, at all times, and for all peoples; and will be the same paramount and only law, at all times, and for all peoples, so long as man shall live upon the earth. ~ Natural Law; or the Science of Justice by Lysander Spooner "...it is everyone's right and duty to forcibly uphold natural law..." ~ Natural Law and Natural Rights by James A. Donald ___________________________________________________________________________ [1] REPUB'LIC, n. [L. respublica; res and publica; public affairs.] 1. A commonwealth... COMMONWEALTH, n. 1. ...A commonwealth is properly a free state... [2] COEVAL, a. Of the same age; beginning to exist at the same time; of equal age; usually and properly followed by with. ~ Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language [Emphasis added]
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 29 weeks ago
    Natural Law
    Web link Don Stacy
    Well as I (Rob S.) quoted in my book The New History of America, the case of Cruden v. Neale, where the court states a principle of natural law so clear that it cannot be twisted by any lawyer, that man is only bound by the laws of nature. Here is what the court stated: "...That the majority shall prevail is a rule posterior to the formation of government, and results from it. IT IS NOT A RULE BINDING UPON MANKIND IN THEIR NATURAL STATE. THERE, EVERY MAN IS INDEPENDENT OF ALL LAWS, EXCEPT THOSE PRESCRIBED BY NATURE.. He is not bound by any institutions formed by his fellowmen without his consent." ~ CRUDEN v. NEALE, 2 N.C. 338 (1796) 2 S.E. 70 Excerpted from an article entitled HOW "CITIZENS" ARE TRANSFORMED INTO "PERSONS" found HERE
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Paul Hein
    Paul Hein, (1) "What we call 'government,' or the 'state,' is people: actual living, breathing human beings" If so, then we may call it a set, in a mathematician's sense of the word set, for these human beings are not like the cells of an organism that is itself a living being. Instead, this set is a mental object. Even though the members of this set are living psychophysical beings, the set itself is without physical reality. The set is not alive, and it does no deed, either good or evil. Furthermore, if you and I conceived of a set of the same 99 individuals, we might call them by the same name, "government", but we would have in fact formed two separate sets, just as we have two minds among us. There would be quite literally two governments comprised of the same 99 individuals. That there are two governments, each with the same 99 persons, would hold unless, perhaps, our minds have as their object the same nonphysical entity which each of us is calling government. (We might have given it different names, but the names would have a common, single referent.) Now we've come to speculative metaphysics, but my main point remains the same. You defined government such that it's a set of people, not their activites. To disperse the government would be no more than to disperse the set conceived in one's mind. Not exactly a worldchanging revolt. If, on the other hand, you define government as the coordinated actions of several actual, living breathing human beings, then the sets problem vanishes. Now the government is something in the physical world, but again it does no work, for government, itself, is the work or activity. This definition suggests what I think you already realize is true anyway: Halting the organized criminalism is no more complicated than preventing the individuals responsible for government, in this latter sense of government, from acting in concert with one another. No great earthquake there, but I hope it suggests something important about liberals establishing an advantage over statists in terms of being able to act in concert. Another implication is that once most of the people who perform the actions called government fall asleep, most of the government vanishes from existence. In fact, much of the government has vanished by the time they are getting into bed. (2) "nobody reads the constitution" So it would appear. Or perhaps lots of people read it, or small portions of it, but they tend to project on to it what they want to find. Or they keep their mouths shut if they find an incoherency or something of which they disapprove. As Paul noted, it's a useful tool for the political class. Nevertheless, I would argue that lots of people read the federal one but almost no one thinks about it very carefully. Take Article VII, for example. It reads that nine states' conventions must ratify the Constitution for it to be established as supreme law. But prior to establishment, that article can provide no such criteria. To suppose that it could is to presuppose establishment before establishment. So the criteria must come from outside the text of the Const. If ever the C. were established, Art. VII would be superfluous. (Note that Art. VII ends with the word "Same", contrary to what one regular contributor at LewRockwell.com claimed in a long book about the C. and its adoption.) (3) Illinois' constitution has a few doozies. One is theocracy. The preamble begins, "We, the People of the State of Illinois—grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberty which He has permitted us to enjoy...". (Emphasis mine.) Granted, theocracy is common among the provinces' constitutions. Later we find the preamble larded with soft socialism and parental mush "...in order to provide for the health, safety and welfare of the people;...; eliminate poverty and inequality; assure legal, social and economic justice; provide opportunity for the fullest development of the individual;...". (4) "So, when?" How about at noon on day of the next equinox? A silent standing against the organized crime state. Wear black. Noon would be when the sun is at its highest in the sky wheresoever one happens to be, thus noon is not necessarily at 12:00. I have some other ideas, too, and have already written down a few. Hat tip to TED. See video http://www.ted.com/talks/wael_ghonim_inside_the_egyptian_revolution.html, esp. 4:55. Ghonim mentioned everyone gathering for an hour, so if we followed that example and raised our hands at noon for a minute, harmony and balance suggest arriving thirty minutes before noon. These suggest also raising one's hand thirty seconds before noon. Since movement building is important, I think it wise to repeat this silent standing procedure at the following equinox, as well as the solstices. The periods in between are, as ever, when the difficult work would be done to cultivate harmonious thinking on key points such as voluntaryism, the right to private property, ownership of one's own body, nonmonopoly of protection services (as with military communism), and so forth. Anthony Gregory published a long list of important concepts. The list can be found at The Libertarian Standard.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 29 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    Hi, A Liberal in Lakeview -- Actually, by "love" I mean the compassionate sense of connection with others that characterizes emotional health. People who are treated with compassion and respect in childhood, and who are not badly traumatized (from birth on, and even including the third trimester during pregnancy) are empathic, compassionate, relaxed, and respectful of others. Freedom for children plays a HUGE role in creating adults who deeply understand freedom. Most people have no idea of the importance of freedom in the lives of children. Here are excerpts from a 1949 report on Summerhill School by British government inspectors; the full text is at http://www.paradise-paradigm.net/summerhill.htm -- and note that these results were achieved on a shoe-string by a private school with a chicken-scratch budget -- "The main principle upon which the School is run is freedom. ... the degree of freedom allowed to the children is very much greater than the inspectors had seen in any other school and the freedom is real. No child, for instance, is obliged to attend any lessons. As will be revealed later, the majority do attend for the most part regularly, but one pupil was actually at this School for 13 years without once attending a lesson and is now an expert toolmaker and precision instrument maker. This extreme case is mentioned to show that the freedom given to children is genuine and is not withdrawn as soon as its results become awkward." "... the children are full of life and zest. Of boredom and apathy there was no sign. An atmosphere of contentment and tolerance pervades the School." "... the children's manners are delightful. They may lack, here and there, some of the conventions of manners, but their friendliness, ease and naturalness, and their total lack of shyness and self-consciousness made them very easy, pleasant people to get on with." "...initiative, responsibility and integrity are all encouraged by the system and that so far as such things can be judged, they are in fact being developed." "Summerhill education is not necessarily hostile to worldly success." The report backs up that last point with a list of degrees held and careers followed by former pupils. Clearly, the lack of a "normal," coercive education has not harmed the children of Summerhill. More importantly, compared with a modern American public (that is, coercive-government) school, Summerhill clearly produces -- and has, for over 75 years -- exactly the kind of people we would all want as neighbors. For more examples, look into Sudbury Valley School in America and other schools on the same model. In today's America, most children coerced constantly throughout their school years, and worse, birth and post-birth practices are increasingly traumatic for newborns, shutting them down to deep feeling (including to compassion and empathy) before they even get started in life. In most of the world, inc. Europe, home births, midwives, and (at least somewhat) natural birth practices are the norm. Here in the States, the medical industry has evolved into a system that pushes C-sections (25% or so of all births! -- vs maybe 4 or 5% that might really be medically necessary ) and that uses other "technologies" designed to both protect the physical health of the baby and enhance the doctor's income and convenience (such as induced labor, for birth by appointment). The result of all this, plus the educational nightmare and other problems, is this: "College Students Are Less Empathic Than Generations Past" "Research presented at the conference of the Association for Psychological Science found that today's college students are far less empathic than their counterparts 30 years ago." ( http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=college-student... ) Love (or compassion, empathy, a sense of connection, or whatever you prefer to call it) is the lubricant and anti-corrosive for the market and for a free society generally. Creating millions of semi-sociopaths, which I believe is exactly what we're doing, is NOT a good thing for any society that hopes for freedom.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 29 weeks ago Web link Anthony Gregory
    All governments use theft, rape, torture and murder.