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  • jeffydiver's picture
    jeffydiver 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Westernerd
    Yeah, it's amazing to watch our leaders retire in plush wealth while we suffer with economic disasters.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Westernerd
    Ah, but for our exalted leaders and their minions, it HAS BEEN "worth the price" -- every cent, every human life, every last bit of the shredded constitution. It was all about increasing their power. Everything about the great "war on terror," like everything about the holy "war on drugs," including its much-lamented "failure" to protect the public, is a lie.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Westernerd
    A nice turn of phrase: "That US foreign policy is the product of a venal calculus centered on the interests of imperialists is never really the message; no, that would be just too indecorous, too honest, a way to discuss the decision-making of our sage overlords. Instead, the takeaway message is always that complex, strategic alliances, necessary for the preservation of those consecrated “national interests,” sometimes make odd bedfellows, but that we should never question their underlying wisdom."
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Westernerd
    I commented in another forum: --------------- Keep in mind that an index like this is an aggregation of factors, not all of which should be considered positive from one's own point of view. For example, the article states, "While the Lone Star State may not be perfect—many leaders would like to see improvements in its education system..." By that one can guess that one measure of "goodness" in this Index is something like per-capita expenditures of tax dollars for "edjookashun" (I have not verified this by examining their model, it's just a guess). Personally I would consider that a negative, not a positive. Businessmen are not consistently pro-freedom.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Westernerd
    Looks like it is Julia Ward Howe, not Julia Howard Stowe. And disarmament is not a way to peace, either. Anarchy is.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Page B.R. Merrick
    Good one, B.R. I too enjoyed the movie. My wife has a fondness for what I suppose could be called the "Masterpiece Theatre" genre, angst among the English ruling class. Heaven knows why. But we did see and enjoy the movie. I too have little use for the concept of blame. I've been on forums where assigning blame seems to be the primary activity. It seems a little childish to me.
  • Evan's picture
    Evan 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Westernerd
    To the tune of Yankee Doodle Dandy: QUILLY WILLY FREE-QUILL by Richard Onley Quilly Willy rode the flag On field of black and yellow. It's time the snake vacated for A more congenial fellow. Quilly Willy, shed the tread! Quilly Willy free-quill, Stick up for the points you make-- All porcs debated e-quill. Quilly Willy stands upon The "DON'T TREAD ON ME" slogan. Pay attention, or you'll get His needles through your brogan Quilly Willy rides the flag's Ebon and amaryllis No room to put his motto From the Latin: Cave quill-us. Quilly Willy went to Gun Church Riding on a scooter Guess it should be no surprise That he's a real sharp-shooter Quilly Willy went to Grafton Riding on a walrus Hoping to swim out to meet The Peaceful Plesiosaurus Quilly Willy, shed the tread! Quilly Willy free-quill If Porc weight doesn't sink the raft The 'pine-spine-punctured leak-will Quilly Willy hied Southwest To meet up with a cactus Both agreed upon the point: To get sharp--better practice! Quilly Willy hates the State, And blushes when admitting That if New Hampshire's President Was Franklin Pierce, that's fitting. He liked the name, but not the fact Pierce was a politician "I'd much prefer that Hawkeye guy-- An honest, brave physician." Quilly Willy told the cops, "Stop pushing and stop shoving. Porcs know that in this sad world, we All needle-little loving."
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    I do not consent to be a subject of the "Obama Administration", just like I didn't consent to be a subject of the "Bush Administration", just like I didn't consent to be a subject of the "Clinton Administration". Your masters may one day murder me, Michael Kleen, but nevertheless, I DO NOT CONSENT, I DO NOT CONSENT, I DO NOT CONSENT! Actus me invito factus, non est meus actus.
  • Persona non grata's picture
    Persona non grata 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    I propose we levy a tax on every word any politician speaks at federal, state and local levels of the criminal syndicate known as our "government".
  • Michael Kleen's picture
    Michael Kleen 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    I hear what you're saying, but something tells me the Obama Administration won't be persuaded by that argument...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Natural Law
    Web link Don Stacy
    Your submission has triggered the spam filter and will not be accepted. "The natural law and the positive law are not alternative systems of rules that apply to the same thing. The natural law is the law of natural persons and positive law is a law of artificial persons." ~ Natural Law by Frank van Dun, Ph.D., Dr.Jur. - Senior lecturer Philosophy of Law
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Natural Law
    Web link Don Stacy
    Natural Law by Frank van Dun, Ph.D., Dr.Jur. - Senior lecturer Philosophy of Law. This, in my opinion, is a MUST READ, for sovereign men and women.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    "...a plan to tax automobile drivers..." Driver -- One employed in conducting a coach, carriage, wagon, or other vehicle... ~ Bouvier's Law Dictionary, 1914 ed., Pg. 940 [Emphasis and footnote added] I am not a DRIVER since this Sovereign Man is not employed[1] and is not using the highway for business, or for profit. ________________________________________________________________________________ [1] Employed. Performing work under an employer-employee relationship. Term signifies both the act of doing a thing and the being under contract or orders to do it. ~ Black's Law Dictionary, Sixth Edition (c.1991), page 495
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Natural Law
    Web link Don Stacy
    Those who desire to rule over all of the Earth's inhabitants are also determined to extirpate the defenders of the natural law (of man); of which class, regardless of party censure, is THIS AUTHOR. "Nowadays, the study of natural law virtually has been banned from the training of lawyers. What remains of it in the academic curriculum of most law schools is no more than a little bit of 'intellectual history', which is devoted mainly to the works of a handful of ancient, medieval and early modern writers and philosophers. Often, students get the impression that natural law is something that can be found only in books (in the same way that statutory law, the verdicts of courts and international treaties are mere texts). They are led to believe that the natural law is nothing but a collection of theories of natural law. It is not. Nor, of course, is the physical universe nothing but a collection of theories of physics. The practice of natural law also has been eliminated almost completely by the legal profession. Very often, the study and the practice of natural law are scorned if not ridiculed. ...the most important reason for the negative attitude [toward natural law] is that the legal profession has discovered that there is much more money to be made from focusing on highly politicized complex, constantly changing systems of social regulation than it ever could hope to make from the study and practice of natural law." ~ Natural Law by Frank van Dun, Ph.D., Dr.Jur. - Senior lecturer Philosophy of Law. [Emphasis added]
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Nice column, Bob. I enjoyed both the information about mythology and its terminology and the psychological analysis -- this last, with most authors, is often teeth-grittingly off the mark IMO, but I think you do a good job here; Alice Miller's work supports much of your analysis strongly. I'm less sure about some of the individual motivations you put forth -- I suspect that E. Howard Hunt was right about LBJ participating in the JFK plot and think it likely that escalating the war after Kennedy was out of the way was always meant to be LBJ's major contribution. Just my guess, of course. In any case, again: I appreciate your effort to educate with this column. One rather embarrasing bit of proof that it's necessary is that I had no idea what your title referred to, until I read the column itself -- Koros and Ate were not in my mental dictionary at all.
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 10 weeks ago
    Osama won.
    Web link Michael Dunn
    "...our economy, symbolised by the world trade center" That remark brought to mind the identity of the owners of the WTC and the way that they obtained the land on which it was built. Perhaps one day the Sept. 11 attacks will be regarded by a majority as those attacks should be regarded: As an attack upon a form of communism. The airport, airline, and aircraft industries, too, are rotten and were rotten at the time of attack. Let's see now: (1) Airports: Communistically built, owned, and operated. (2) Airlines: Subsidized indirectly through the airports. (3) Commercial Jet Aircraft: Subsidized by the government through militarism. The research and development needed to design large aircraft and jet engines has always been subsidized by military spending. Other overhead expenses such as construction plants were paid wholly or in part by military spending at the beginning of the jet age, and since that time the basic arrangement has remained in place. Some of the benefits of this subsidization are enjoyed by the airlines, too. And what about the Pentagon? How does that palace of imperial aggression not count as proof of communism and government monopoly in defense services? Since it and its activities are subsidized by extorted wealth, it stands to reason that Americans are getting far more defense service than would be provided in the case of laissez faire. Still worse, the military power is employed for aggression, too, and resistance to the aggression is deemed criminal. The outlandish amount of spending is therefore mostly wasteful and tends to divert an enourmous amount of capital from savings and investment that would have been possible in the absence of the militarism. I don't know if OBL understood how the American economy works. If he did, then he deserves a little respect for helping to carry out the attacks in the manner that he did. After all, main street was not attacked, at least not until the taxgatherers, all of them Americans, showed up to compel main streeters to pay for the response by the military and domestic police forces. If only the IRS, too, had been attacked on Sept. 11, events might have played out a little bit better during the past nine and 2/3 years. The fact that the IRS was not attacked leads me to suspect that OBL was much less interested in fighting evil than he was in helping Muslims to posture as victims. Still, it remains true that communism was attacked on Sept. 11, and this fact should be repeated ad nauseum until the conservatives yield to the truth and correct their bad behavior in support of communism.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 10 weeks ago
    In Rwanda Today
    Web link Michael Dunn
    There's a lesson here; that is, if Americans could learn anything from brown-skinned foreigners.
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    It doesn't seem to me that cops are anything like they used to be. Many of these guys are now younger than I am, growing up in broken homes with no fathers, subjected to 12 years of indoctrination and an increasingly rotten popular culture. They apparently have a lot to be angry about, and now the state has given them guns to play with. Not a good development, if my premises are correct.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Glen, I'll certainly start using your image. L
  • Scott Lazarowitz's picture
    Scott Lazarowitz 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    Thanks for the video link, Michael. The guy being interviewed, Julio, stated that the students had the permission of local police to hold a block party, and sounded as though the police were planning their "intervention" from the very beginning, implying that the whole "riot" was provoked by the "authorities." Just another example of why the peace and "order" of local neighborhoods needs to be decentralized, and, especially, why the government's monopoly of "policing" needs to be removed.
  • AtlasAikido's picture
    AtlasAikido 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Mr. Wallace continues... When called out on his "intellectual dishonesty" he asserts: "[a]fraid not" And continues with assumptions and religious projections... The Lefties he speaks to have been "Warring" UNsuccessfully to smear Ayn Rand as a "socialist" and hippocrite for some time. Is he at the same time conflating Rand with the Lefties that have tried to smear her? It makes no sense. These two things remind of what? Tom Woods Is Interviewed by a Zombie Recently by Thomas E. Woods, Jr.: http://www.lewrockwell.com/woods/woods145.html And It’s Ayn Rand Bashing Time, Once Again by Walter Block http://www.lewrockwell.com/block/block172.html
  • A Liberal in Lakeview's picture
    A Liberal in La... 3 years 10 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    This is an outrage. An oily, malevolent, self-aggrandizing, narcissistic martyr, the king of all Jews, has been denied his will to commit premeditated suicide by Sanhedrin and by Roman cop. And now the Roman government has another excuse to extort more wealth from the public, since the cell block must be staffed and maintained, and the oily bleeding heart, fed. McElroy sure does have a keen eye for good segues, though. It's not hard to imagine what the provinces of the USA would become if the noxious vine in the DC were killed. Take "Constitution for the State of Illinois", for example. Its preamble is not only brazenly theorcratic but also nanny statist. There we have two licenses for charging dissidents with terrorism. The preamble isn't specifically Christian, however. So you gotta hand it to the theorcrats of the competing Abrahamic cults; they know how far to push the envelope without dividing theirselves against each other more than they already are. Still, the Illinoisan constitution needs to have the nonsense removed so that the ground will be better prepared for the killing of the Columbian vine. See "1970 ILLINOIS CONSTITUTION ANNOTATED FOR LEGISLATORS". http://www.ilga.gov/commission/lru/ILConstitution.pdf "Yet Tucker had no quarrel with religion as a personal, voluntary code of morality. " Judaism sure doesn't fit the criteria of personal and voluntary, and neither does Christianity. Perhaps Tucker was aware of this fact, as would have been even more prudent in his day than in our own. "Those involved in the mock trial of Jesus offered him a reduced sentence for speaking the truth." Jesus v. the Sanhedrin and the Roman government is a little like the anarcho-communists, so called, v. government. Those commies dream of sweeping away the present order and then setting up their own tyranny in its place. Thus do they have a flag that's black along the leading edge of the hoist and red at the trailing edge of the fly. Clever, clever commies. Still so clever, as were Jesus, his Rock, and that murderous knave, Saul. Note well how Wendy returned to her original point of departure at the end of her essay. It's a sign of a thoughtful writer.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Thanks for highlighting both the cafe and the upcoming event. I lived in SD for years and still have friends and family there, so it's good to know the libertarian streak that has long been embedded in the area is thriving. (Richard Rider, big-L Libertarian who ran a good campaign for San Diego mayor a few years ago, actually managed to get an illegal increase in the CA state sales tax REVERSED via the courts back in the previous millennium). On the idea of a symbol for the movement, I commissioned the one you see above this comment recently. I'm placing it (and several variations, with and without text) in the public domain and would love to see its use spread among those who believe that liberty cannot flourish (or long survive) without a widespread sense of compassion and connection in society. Likewise, love cannot survive without freedom; tyranny is always toxic to love and compassion.
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    The religion of objectivism is one of the least intrusive and coercive religions I have ever encountered, then. The gods in charge of it seem far more preocuppied with their own interests than mine. That's okay by me. I also have no problem with the "hell" Rand described. That's what government intervention does. It creates hell on earth: "Murder, chaos, destruction." I'd rather live in a "heaven" like Galt's Gulch, where people build society because they enjoy it. I don't think that's anything like fascism, which is where favored corporations heavily regulated by a government feed us a pretend free market and mollify us. Again, I agree that some of Rand's premises were false, and I enjoyed Ludlow's jab at her writing style (very, very funny), but I'm not getting the connection with fascism.
  • Robert Wallace's picture
    Robert Wallace 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    "This is an easily falsified statement" 'Fraid not. Objectivism is not a philosophy but a religion: Galt's Gulch: Heaven with gods; outside: Hell with demons. What would happen in Rand's fictional Hell? Murder, chaos, destruction.
  • Robert Wallace's picture
    Robert Wallace 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Rand was more of a leftist than a rightist. Her belief in an Oakshottian rationalism, her belief in political messiahs, her attempts to overthrow all tradition, her vicious hatred of all religion...pure leftism. By the way, Objectivism is a religion. Galt's Gulch: Heaven with gods. Outside Galt's Gulch: hell with demons.
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    My God. Rand is back! :)
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    I wouldn't say "predestinated." I would say "predisposed." It's about forming habits, which we all do. Sometimes to fix a "bad" habit, one needs to look more closely at what happened in early life, so that one can find out where the internal lying started. I know I taught myself a few whoppers. Perhaps "lying" is too strong a word, because I don't think people intend to lie to themselves, but there is some refusal to look at the truth. "Falsehoods" is perhaps a better word.
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    How else was I to interpret a quote that includes "mom’s sloppy butt-wiping techniques"? To point out that the rear end is an erogenous zone is to point out a fact, not to be fixated on it. Actions have consequences, which is where personal responsibility comes in. But death-oriented actions like drug taking, child abusing, vandalizing, and so forth often come from lies that circulate in the mind. Once you get at the heart of these lies, why you believed them for as long as you did, you normally find that you were taught incorrect principles beginning in childhood, whether those principles were intentionally or unintentionally taught. Face up to it as an adult who doesn't need to be afraid of a sometimes profound lack of love in your early life, and you're well on your way towards being more life-oriented. The problem with quotes like the one you originally provided is that those people are (perhaps unwillingly) denigrating a search for the truth concerning what the child lied to himself about. To point out personal responsibility for adult actions is one thing. But the work of Alice Miller, which has been of tremendous benefit to many people including me, focuses on being honest once and for all with what you really thought and felt as child. It's a search for the truth about your own mind. People from truly loving homes seldom have to worry too much about responsibility for the many awful things other people seem capable of doing, because they don't do those sorts of things. The search for greater understanding of where one's mind came from in one's early life is crucially important. My fear is that quotes like the one you provided seem to make fun of research that unfortunately gets too easily lumped into the type of psychoanalysis that asserts we are not responsible for what we do as adults.
  • Guest's picture
    guillermo112 (not verified) 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    I am agree, people are usually predestinated to do some things...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Michael Kleen
    @B.R Merrick, Funny, I don't recall saying that "parents are never responsible for anything". Let's put the shoe on the other foot and see how you like it. How calloused of me, of course you are right, YOU are NEVER responsible for YOUR OWN actions, it's always someone else's ( ________________ [just insert your favorite scapegoat]) fault that YOU do the things YOU do. Is it too many spankings that makes a man unnaturally fixated on the "rear end" being an "erogenous zone"? There are several OTHERS, that are far higher on the list of "erogenous zones", too, you know.
  • AtlasAikido's picture
    AtlasAikido 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    3 things to the above posters. Even though her description of Galt's Gulch is a functional anarchy (no rulers), Rand abhorred what she thought of as "anarchy" and she explicitly embraced the idea of minimal government. HOWEVER, as George H Smith points out "...Rand's principles, if consistently applied, lead necessarily to a repudiation of government on moral grounds". “IN DEFENSE OF RATIONAL ANARCHISM” http://dennisleewilson.com/simplemachinesforum/index.php?topic=34.0 And Carrie Burdzinski identifies good reason why SOME Objectivists do not apply these principles. “Objectivist Resistance to Anarchy: A Problem of Concept Formation?” Column by new Root Striker Carrie Burdzinski. http://www.strike-the-root.com/91/burdzinski/burdzinski1.html And Dennis Wilson ties it all together from what Ayn Rand says about the gulch in her letters; Judge Narragansett’s activities in the closing pages of Atlas Shrugged; Galts Oath NAP/ZAP and the L. Neil Smith’s Covenant of Unanimous Consent. The Covenant also satisfies the objections noted by Lysander Spooner and B.R. Merrick. Look for the first five asterisks ***** In: “A personal journey from Objectivist morality to political “anarchy**” http://dennisleewilson.com/simplemachinesforum/index.php?topic=10.0 http://tinyurl.com/2dm6kgj ________________________________________ http://www.ncc-1776.org/tle2006/tle379-20060806-03.html
  • AtlasAikido's picture
    AtlasAikido 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Mr Wall[a]ce's Horrid criticisms of Miss Rand bespeak a serious misunderstanding of her philosophy and how they relate to current economic and political events playing out right now a la Greenspan and Bernanke and bureaucracy VS Mises (minarchist), his students Rothbard, LewRockwell and Walter Block (anarchists) who stood on Mises and Ayn Rand's shoulders. The Ayn Rand Bashing that Bob Wall[a]ce sets himself upon is hardly "original". The Lefties he speaks to have UNsuccessfully tried to smear Ayn Rand as a "socialist" and hippocrite. Is he at the same time conflating Rand with the Lefties that have tried to smear her? It makes no sense. Not the least Mr Wall[a]ce misconstrues libertarian philosophy and Rand's principles. He has plenty of company. But this is sorted out in my post today with links and supporting points.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    I have to agree with Mr. Merrick in so far as Mr. Wallace has intentionally misrepresented the situation in Atlas Shrugged by writing the following sentence in his Tzo-cited artice: "She projects all hate, rage and envy onto them, scapegoats them, and then engages in a sadistic Hitlerian orgy of hate and destruction and kills off nearly everyone outside of Galt's Gulch." This is an easily falsified statement. She does not kill everyone outside of Galt's Gulch. She abandons them. And while it is true that Ms. Rand expanded upon her fiction writings in numerous minarchist essays that contain the seed of statism in their minarchy, it does not help when one falsifies what she actually said. So Mr. Wallace owes his readers a mea culpa for this. I agree that Ms. Rand had a sadly overbearing view, and fortunately Nathanial Brandon and his wife have written extensively and informatively about precisely where she went awry. I think that Mr. Wallace should treat his wooden idol of Ms. Rand (something she shared with her characters) with a bit of humor, which is why I wrote the following satire about her once the excitement of reading Ms. Rand wore off and I began to see her warts: http://www.strike-the-root.com/atlases-at-home-children
  • AtlasAikido's picture
    AtlasAikido 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    with all due respect I think you are right. I would add that Bob Wall[a]ce's column covers a lot of ground and at the same time none because he assumes on such a grand scale. And this is only the beginning.
  • Westernerd's picture
    Westernerd 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Very interesting article, Paul, I'm glad you addressed this issue, and that specific article in general. I posted that article two weekends ago because I found it very interesting, as most intra-libertarian ponderings and squabbles tend to be. My gut told me Steve's arguments were mealy-mouthed and actually harmed the arguments in favor of liberty by essentially giving up on the most imporant aspect of libertarian philosophy (the NAP), but there is no way I could do as good as job analyzing Steve's article as you. "But somehow I find it hard to trust folks like Steve, even when (at the moment) he is making some kind of argument for freedom. I suppose it’s just because of comments such as the one he made below his article: “Yes, if coercion actually did improve the lives of poor folks, or if socialism really did bring us a world in which we were all better off and lived wonderful lives, I would support them.” Oh, boy, another world improver; just what we need!" That paragraph really summed it up for me. Good work Paul
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Thanks for the link. It was informative, but I'm still not convinced. The author in the linked article says: "How could she so gleefully rub out the entire world? How could she so cold-bloodedly kill innocent children in the infamous train-tunnel-collapse scene?" I didn't read any glee in what she wrote any more than I would read any other author's "glee" in describing terrible events. Rand only killed innocent children in the sense that they only existed in her mind, and she could do what she wanted with the characters she invented. It didn't seem cold-blooded to me. The jerk demanding that a train, any train, get him to his destination, against all logic and concern, was the cold-blooded killer, and that only unintentionally. It seems to me that Rand's purpose was to show the dire consequences of listening to "parasites." I still do not see anything definitive, from "Atlas Shrugged" or any other writings, where she labeled the entire world as "looters," "parasites" or "sub-humans." I got the impression from the book that those were words reserved for government agents and the businessmen who got into bed with them. Am I wrong?
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Yeah, it's a lot like that "sanitizing" job that happened to Oswald and at Waco and at the WTC site. How convenient that OBL will not be able to give testimony and to name names (of embarrassed allies) and to cite reasons for hating the US Gov-Co operation that has killed between 4 and 5 million people since the end of WW2. Heck, there might be some grand photos of Cheney and his ilk doing air-kisses with OBL in some tent somewhere. I can just see the frightened face of the sheep as Cheney and Dubya do the bedroom-eye thing to the poor sheep's flanks.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I understand the need to believe that something can somehow make sense of this madness. We want things to have meaning instead of just being some half-assed video sequences of stupid frat-party boys shouting and fist-pumping in NYC and in DC over the death of today's Goldstein. Someone once said that I'm a crypto-Catholic because I like some of the (admittedly few) positive aspects of some members of the Catholic faith.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Exactly what I thought when I read this article. The quote in your second to last paragraph is most telling and you nailed him for it. Well done Paul.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    This is just a little to neat and tidy for my cynical self to buy whole. I can see why the US Thugs would go ahead and shoot him, because a trial would bring up too many inconvenient truths and Osama would likely get acquitted. But why not show his body to everyone so we could verify that Goldstein is really dead? Or wasn’t already dead? The timing of Obama preempting Trump’s TV show to get hero worship face time, and in the process also throw the birther certificate BS off the front page, is just an amazing coincidence.
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Well, here is an article by a guy named Bob Wallace that addresses the comment: http://personalitycafe.com/critical-thinking-philosophy/18311-secret-tea...
  • Robert Wallace's picture
    Robert Wallace 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    The article has nohing to do with Alan Greenspan, Murray Rothbard or Ludwig von Mises. The amusing thing about Randroids is the way they throw conniption fits when anyone impugns Rand and her leftist-militant-atheist (they all go together) nonsense. Objectivists in general are ignorant, not only having never heard of Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn, but W. H. Mallock, who eviserated socialism before Rand was even born. What is "original" in Rand is not good, and what is good in her is not original.
  • Robert Wallace's picture
    Robert Wallace 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Bob Wallace
    Unfortunately I do not remember where I read Rand's comment about subhumans living in a hell, but I believe it was from Atlas Shrugged.
  • B.R. Merrick's picture
    B.R. Merrick 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    "Where was his trial?" No need for grand jury investigations anymore. You'll find grand jury investigations into every other terrorist attack you can think of that in any way involved Americans, but not you-know-what. Apparently, when you're bad-ass enough, even a grand jury isn't necessary. Gosh, he really was that evil, wasn't he?
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    If 9/11 was a crime, and Bin Laden was a suspect, then Yay, we killed the suspect? What if he did nothing? Where was his trial? Ah, that process is reserved for real human beings, not for troglodytes who are dim enough to be born outside of the magic lines. It only took 10 years and a few thousand subhuman lives to get him, which was certainly worth it. Unfortunately, more than just a few real human beings from the US of A died, too. Better keep wiping those animals off the face of the Earth to teach them a lesson about how they need to treat their betters. I almost wish I believed in heaven and hell. "Begging mercies for their sins, Satan laughing spreads his wings."
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    PS: I'm waiting for some sign of intelligence in either NYC or DC, but not holding my breath.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    By the way, I've been asked why I think it is significant that Obama the Bloody uses the word "clear" so often. Here's the answer. When Dubya was Murderer in Chief, he overused adverbs such as "clearly" whenever he was saying something that was a lie or as clear as mud. It's a way to bolster up a weak talking point. He overused other adverbs as well to prop up his claims. Some brilliant genius of style within the Obama regime was hip to that, and what was his/her brilliant solution to making Obama sound un-Dubya (to use Orwellian Newspeak)? Instead of overusing adverbs (ending in "ly"), the new president simply overused adjectives such as "clear" whenever he is saying an unsupportable non sequitur.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Yes, all of the drooling morons and tax-subsidized parasites were crowing last night. It's 3rd-century Rome all over again, eh?
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 10 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Watch out, Lawrence. After all, "A man that should call everything by its right name, would hardly pass the streets without being knocked down as a common enemy ," as Lord Halifax pointed out.