Recent comments

  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 32 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    That view does seem to be shared by a certain former lady prisoner in Windsor.
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 32 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    I wouldn't put too much faith in the police within VT either.  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 32 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 33 weeks 3 hours ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    Jim:  I don't think you'll have to wonder very hard.  Suffice it to say I'm glad I came here to Vermont.  Have never regretted it.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 33 weeks 5 hours ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    Is this in Seabrook, New Hampshire? But NH is the "Live Free or Die" State!   I wonder what Alex Knight thinks.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 33 weeks 8 hours ago Web link Sharon Secor
    This is the refletion of the cognitive ability of the American Legislators. Just read recently that the Obamacare act, DOJ and another acronym is filing chagres at the Little Sister Nuns for refusal to sign permission slipsforaortion. The GOVERNMENT IS GOING AFTER NUNS FOR GODS SAKE. The only climate prediction I see that is coming near the truth is the one reported in Time magazine around 1976. "An Ice Ag Is comming"
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 33 weeks 8 hours ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Oh, P.S. His drivers licenses is expired also.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 33 weeks 8 hours ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Ha. You legal eagles. I have a son 37 years old who has been driving around all over the state with an an expired, plate, expired tag,no registration and not proof of insurance. Why he has not been stopped yet is beyond me. If it were me I would be caught the first day. He has been driving this way now for two years.
  • PaulTheCabDriver's picture
    PaulTheCabDriver 33 weeks 2 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, you people in Missouri are so damned lucky! You get colored decals to put on YOUR license plates. And you get TWO license plates too: One for the back and one for the front. Out here in Arizona, we only get one measly license plate. And it's not even embossed. The letters on it are just printed on a flat plate! And we don't get color stickers either. Ours are black and white. It sucks I tell you. I want my money back!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 33 weeks 2 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    When they get laughed at, their fate is sealed. A very nice one, Paul Hein.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 3 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Call it the "War on Farts".
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 3 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    [I find it humorous that there are people that expected their concerns to be addressed.] Maybe they didn't expect it. Meanwhile it is a great embarrassment for the rulers, so it can't be a bad thing.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 3 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Some laws just beg to be disobeyed.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 3 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, I can fully appreciate your sarcastic tone in this article. I too feel great pride and reverence when applying the colorful stickers to my plates. Fortunately my state charges a lot less for the privilege to do so ($1,659.07, ouch!) - more like a hundred dollars. Wife bought a new car recently, a Porsche. The dealer asked if we wanted them to drill holes in the bumper to hold the plate. Confused, I asked him if I had a choice (Oregon is not a state with optional front plates). He said legally no, but that some of his customers nevertheless insisted their bumpers not have holes drilled in them, and they just took their chances. I thought we'd give that a try. After all, one gets to the stage where obedience is no longer automatic. The older I get, the less I give a shit about what legiscritters want. For your amusement, "The License Plate War": http://www.ncc-1776.org/tle2013/tle739-20130929-05.html
  • Don Stacy's picture
    Don Stacy 33 weeks 3 days ago Page Don Stacy
    I have yet to see that want ad either.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 33 weeks 3 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    The syphilis theory is possible, Lawrence, but I doubt it and hope it's wrong.   His father Randolph may have had and transmitted the disease, but even that is doubtful - a brain tumor is also likely. In Winston's case, if he had a malady he could not help, it makes him less than responsible for the evil be caused; he'd deserve sympathy more than blame.   In any case, Winston's mental powers were stong enough for him to manage the political game until age 80, when some strokes took him out of it. He lived until age 90, despite a lifetime of heavy drinking and smoking. He was almost fearless; his love of warfare was genuine; he fought in South Africa and, after being eased out of government in 1915, volunteered for the front in France.   "Evil" is a mysterious thing. As reasoned here, I reckon it's not so much that people are evil, rather that it's what almost anyone may do when handed power over other people.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 33 weeks 5 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Yes, I also remember that he once wrote something like the biggest problem with the world was that there weren't enough wars. Do you think he had syphilis of the brain? His father had it bad for a long time, and I have to wonder if it was transmitted to Winston. Even the canonical Manchester bio has that information.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 33 weeks 5 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    War-crazy, indeed. Yet he did, for sure, have a way with words. Here's one:   Lady Astor: Mr Churchill, you are drunk! Churchill: Lady Astor, you are right. However, you are ugly. And tomorrow morning, I shall be sober.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 33 weeks 5 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Thanks Jim, for bringing this to our attention. This is a great instructive story about the lunacy of Churchill.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 33 weeks 5 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Thank you, T-bolt. This was only one of several German offers to end the war. Perhaps it was the most explicit - I've not delved in to the others. Hess' 1941 flight was designed to be interpretable either way; if he succeeded it would be a triumph for the Führer; if it failed (as it did) Hess was to be scorned as a lunatic acting on his own. Don't let's imagine Hitler was a pacifist, of course; he never wanted a 1939 war in the West and wished to end it ASAP, but only so he could focus force on Russia.   The currents of British opinion in this period are interesting. Broadly, the working class hated Fascism out of some sympathy for Communism, the Nazis' stated prime enemy. The aristocracy (not having read von Mises) was terrified of Communism and so saw Fascism as a useful bulwark against it; that was the origin of the Chamberlain - Halifax camp. The middle class wished to avoid war and was generally conservative and patriotic. But in mid-1939 there was a huge swing of opinion against the man who had broken the word he gave at Munich; and from then on, Chamberlain was a prisoner of the voter, and of his own folly in bending to FDR's will in March by "guaranteeing the integrity of Poland."   Had an armistice been agreed in mid-1940, I think the UK public would have swallowed the pill. Horrid memories of 1914-18 were still fresh.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 33 weeks 5 days ago
    Where?
    Page Paul Hein
    You can run, but you can't hide. I am a sovereign state. I have borders across which you must not step without my say-so. Well, I wish you wouldn't. But I'm old and feeble and may not be able to stop you. So please don't. I regard psychopaths organized into that mindless abstraction called "the state" in the same manner that I treat venomous snakes and other dangerous critters. They should be avoided whenever and wherever possible. The cost and discomfort of knee-high boots is like a tax for going to the woods and along the river. I could go barefoot or with sneakers, but snakes observe no property rights, nor do they concern themselves with my convenience or pleasure. Resent it I might, but wear 'em I do. And, considering the bright side, snakes feed on and help control rodents, mosquitoes, and other vermin. So if you're rat and mosquito free, thank a rattler. Sam
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 33 weeks 6 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    The wickedness --and effectiveness--of public school indoctrination and centralized power radiate in your article. "Such is the high cost of silver political tongues. Such is the wickedness of patriotism." Your grasp of history is amazing. It is striking that I cannot recall having learned that Hitler presented a reasoned alternative to this bloodbath, except from you. In essence, perhaps Germany defeated Britain and the U.S., but it took about 70 years to become apparent.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 34 weeks 5 hours ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Well written, Jim.  Was unaware of the unaccepted dubious olive branch.  As an adjunct, have on the way a 1941-42 1,000 + page volume by Hitler, Mein Neu Ordnung (My New Order).  Should be interesting.  I also have on deck Soldiers of Misfortune.  Please type that into the fff.org search engine and find an excellent series of articles by Jacob Hornberger on that book.  For some reason, I can't provide hyperlinks to STR while using this browser (IE 11).
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 34 weeks 6 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Alex--I suffered the batterd mail box syndrome for years. It is an inevitable all over the country. My first box was made of steel welded together. You think that would stop kids from battering the box. Nope. They blew it up with a pipe bomb. Federal offense. Sheriff came out looked around and said. " What do you want me to do about it?" I said "Find the." He said "How. there is absolutely no usable evidence". Down one steel welded mail box. Next was the typical mail box. Smashed, third one was plastic. They melted it with a fire bomb. My last one and still standing is made from oil field pipe 3/8" thick. Well. They blew the hell out of the door but the box remains. It stands today. Oh!. It is mounted into the ground with oil field pipe about 3 feet deep with concrete. If a snow plow were to hit it I am sure it would up root the box, but it would send the truck for a couple of 360 degree turns down the road and maybe into the ditch. Snow plows seem to avoid my mail box like it was a plague because I see wide sweeps away from it. Just a bit of trivia for today, and so you now you are not alone in this disease. Some people around here build a batter board. It is placed to the side of the mail box from the direction traffic flows. 4x4'ss are used and 2x6 are slatted up the 4x4's. In either direction the batter is going to be shaken with a serious reverberation from trying to batter it. This tactic seems to work around here. I've not done it because mine is 3/8" oil field pipe, seven to eight inches in diameter.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 34 weeks 11 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Jim, it's a shame the late, great Loompanics Unlimited is now defunct -- I believe you'd be able to sell Michael Hoy on the publication of a slim instructional volume, Mailbox Musk Guns, or something similar.  :-)  The old Johnson Smith Company of 1970s comic book ads comes to mind as well.   For the time being I've rendered the battered box useful once again for both the receiving and sending of government mail.  It's just cosmetically challenged.  Perhaps, given that Uncle Sam arrogantly considers it his property, that is appropriate.  Should another attack occur and make the box nonfunctional, I will then replace it with something far less attractive to an assault.  'Nuff Said.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 34 weeks 11 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Great article on L. Neil Smith's site, Paul!  And your suggestions for mailbox fortification, as well.  :-)  Of course my caveat "for the time being" speaks to your first statement, and I agree that it would likely take care of most of the issues right there.  My own further caveat, at the very beginning of my column, presaged your entire reply.  :-)
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 34 weeks 12 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Your misfortune, Alex, has spun the wheels of invention. I've come up with a concept design for a non-lethal defense device. It requires expertese in chemistry, electronics and firearms.   The chemist would concoct a supply of that kind of liquid that a skunk squirts to deter predators. You know, the sort that fouls up the whole neighborood for hours on end.   The circuit to be designed would have two parts, sensory and motor. The sensor would detect the noise made when a baseball bat (wooden or metal) hits a mailbox. Account would have to be taken of amplitude (to prevent false alarm when the flap-door is slammed by a mailman) and the audiographics profile. The motor part would cause a trigger to be released as follows, when the impact noise is detected.   The firearms expert - your goodself - would secure a toy water pistol to the mailbox and to the circuit, painted neutrally (battleship gray might fit well) and positioned to be invisible to approaching marauders. It would be pointed at where the open starboard window of a passing pickup would be, directly after an attack. And it would be filled with the chemist's brew.   With good luck, the resulting squirt will hit the bat-wielder full-face, so reducing him to the Untouchables Caste for the week following - and greatly assisting detectors of his crime. With a little less luck, it will at least enter the pickup cabin, necessitating the heavy use of perfume - which will expose the owner to various kinds of ridicule. At the very least, a wide shot will smear the side of the vehicle so as to make it unattractive to passengers such as dates.   The device, once built and perfected, should be marketable by the million, so propelling you at long last into the 1%. Whaddayathink?    
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    "When The State Eliminates Privacy, It Owns YOU" Nonsense. When you fear the state attacks on privacy, it owns you. Roberts is simply wrong about this, and also far too defeatist for my taste. He needs to get control of his fear. http://strike-the-root.com/privacy-conundrum
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    In the end, he was arrested because he permitted it.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    The sporting opportunities are obvious. Get that shotgun out of the closet and polish those skeet shooting skills...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 1 day ago
    Where?
    Page Paul Hein
    We aren't perfectly free. We aren't perfectly slave either. "As soon as I stepped out of Ballwin, the rulers of the adjacent community would regard me as fair prey." Well, there still exist variations worth exploration. Next time you go house-hunting, restrict yourself to communities that have a few dead cars in the street. I'm serious! You won't find near as much liberty in towns infested with do-gooders and "improvers". Just the way it is; no point in complaining about it. Keep in mind a free society WILL STILL HAVE SUCH COMMUNITIES. You need to live where you fit in. Try Montana or Wyoming; people are quite a bit more laid-back there, although Jackson and Sheridan (in Wyoming) still have too many "improvers".
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    "To begin, for certain, any society will have its share of indiscriminate malefactors – and teenagers blowing off steam on holiday break from the government indoctrination centers (publick skools) they’re forced to regularly attend are one kind we’re for the time being saddled with." In a free society there are no publick skools. This will take care of most of the problem right there, since I've mostly gotten my mailbox bashed the night after skool let out. I disagree there is no other recourse. I have frequently just hammered the box back in shape, and simply not worried about it otherwise. Some folks weld up heavy duty boxes that can't be bent by a 2x4. Some weld up steel frames around regular boxes. Some make the connection to the ground an intentional break-away so you simply pick the little-damaged box back up and position it again. And you could rig up a camera with a flash to take pictures of license plates, or infrared game cameras. All of these work better than getting govco involved. Hey, kids are stupid. I still remember when I was one. ;-) Your story reminds me a bit about a somewhat similar episode, recounted here: http://www.ncc-1776.org/tle2009/tle502-20090118-03.html We don't know how things would work for these kinds of irritations in a free society. The bar is low, though. Most likely things would work better than they do now.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Heh... Yeah, you have a point. Similar to the apparent conflict I noted between social pressure (aka shunning) and MYOB. I suppose "everything in moderation" is the answer. One does not normally respond with either shunning or MYOB to every provocation. Neither is very pleasant, and both come with costs. But I think, both will be needed and used in a free society. Standing on a soapbox and holding forth, as we do here on STR, probably doesn't rise to the level of invocating MYOB anyway. One can more easily and simply, walk away.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 34 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Jim -- Happy 2014!  I'm already a couple of steps ahead of you, and have done precisely as you suggest with the red flag.  I have even used it once, to mail my 2014 Gun Owners of America members' survey.    There was contained therein, regrettably, no proposed move to arm mailboxes.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 34 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    They're back to this again?  Ten years ago it was the same refrain.  Beyond ridiculous.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 34 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    This reminds me of the burglary episode near where I live. I had seen the perp, although did not realize what he was doing at the time. I was interviewed by two policemen and three detectives, who knew the likely individual, but were unable to find sufficient evidence. A thousand dollars of office equipment had been stolen from the politically-connected victim of the burglary. Presuming salaries (stolen at gunpoint) of about $3000/month for each of my intervewers, I calculated the theft of an additional 15K. Eliminate government, indeed!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 34 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Commiserations, Alex; what a rotten way to welcome you to the neighborhood. Those yobs make up the population pool from which policemen are recruited.   Congrats though on getting a dog. He or she is one fortunate pooch.   Your antepenultimate paragraph is the kicker. Infuriating though such vandalism seems, it's nothing compared to the wreckage government causes. This damage you have already mostly repaired with a hammer; application of a nut, bolt, and a pair of washers may take care of the red flag. Try using a hammer on a b-rat.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 34 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    O.K. Alex. Mybe I should have read your article first before pronouncing my previous judgement. My mail box has been vandalized by drunk teens also. Living in the country is one of the hazards, however, mine could not be battered in with a baseball bat. It had to be blown up with a pipe bomb. Sheriffs department investigated to no avail, especially since bombing of U.S. Mail boxes is a felony offense. Twice has my mail box been blown up. The most recent, a piece of iron pipe 8 inches in diameter. The box is fine but the hinge was blown completely off. I see many boxes now protected by a dual 4x4 post with 2x6 slats making it difficult for drunk teens to bat a box.This is my fourth mail box in about 30 years. Once I found a dead, skinned out raccoon in my box. Think you are enjoying your mail experience wait a few more years. Ha! Don't ever expect authorities to do their "protect and serve bit". Goo luck.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 34 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    I fully and strongly agree with you Alex on this point. How about Hilliary Clinton being voted most popular woman in America for the 12th consecutive year, according to a Reuters poll. God Bless America, and Goddamned the American Government. I just recently closed on a home, and I was nauseated by all the rules and regulations and charges. 8 and 3/4 percent of the value in a closing tax on the home. among other stateist dream laws, rules, regulations and etc that a home owner must pay just to by a house. That tax is higher than the state tax itself. What's up with that.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 34 weeks 2 days ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Reverend:  Well, if you want to talk constitutionalism, last I looked at that piece of parchment it only talks about the establishment of post offices and post roads.  It says nothing about maintaining such (as in "to establish and maintain a Navy"), and when was the last time the USPS repaired or paved a road?   Fact is, as Spooner so sagely pointed out, constitutions are all bunk.  Pieces of paper don't limit or govern psychopaths.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 34 weeks 2 days ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    The sad thing is, Postal Service is one of the few jobs delegated to the Feds in the Constitution. . . even sadder, is that they spend more time, effort, and yours (and my) money on things which have *not* been delegated, or even which have been delegated or reserved to State and/or Local governments. . . than they do on those things for which the Feds *do* have a mandate. Burn it down.
  • Tom S's picture
    Tom S 34 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    MYOB seems to apply to male genital mutilation just fine.
  • Don Stacy's picture
    Don Stacy 34 weeks 2 days ago Blog entry Don Stacy
    Thanks for the introduction to Walter Williams's book on this theme.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 34 weeks 2 days ago Blog entry Don Stacy
    A good one, Don. How, indeed, can the free market be confused with a system of government rules about racial segregation?   Even if Marx invented the term so as to discredit it, I still think "capitalism" is a useful shorthand for the practice of saving money (postponing consumption) so as to grow a business. But like many terms including "liberal" it's sadly necessary to define them when putting them to use.   Walter Williams wrote a good book on this theme a few years back: South Africa's War Against Capitalism.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 34 weeks 3 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    It was close. It did show the area where I now live - but not where I was born/raised. Weird.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 34 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    One of your better -- best -- presentations, Paul. But tell me this: where would STR go if all of us would abruptly decide to adhere to the MYOB principle? Scary, is it not? Sam
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 34 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Let's not get too excited.  This is a small step in the right direction.  A VERY small step.  What the government of Uruguay is NOT saying is, "It's none of our business what you put into your own body, or where you get it, as long as you've done so peacefully."  No, they're saying, "We're graciously allowing you to smoke pot, as long as you pay all the prescribed tributes to your rulers."  Fuck them!
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 34 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    MYOB sounds good to me, Paul. The NAP often has to be explained. Everyone immediately knows Mind Your Own Business. Since nearly everyone despises cops, I am surprised that they are not shunned in businesses such as restaurants. I presume they would extract revenge in the form of tickets and harassment.
  • rita's picture
    rita 34 weeks 5 days ago
    Where?
    Page Paul Hein
    Actually, you can't buy whatever you want, either.
  • mkghandi's picture
    mkghandi 34 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    NAP, I assume, stands for Non Aggression Principle. MYOB is a meaningless concept to collectivists, and authoritarians. So is NAP. The same as absence of empathy is to a sociopath. Because these people do not understand these concepts, the only exceptions to such principles is to punish those who violate them, and to reward those who honor such principles. They will of course complain (hypocritically) that such discipline is aggression. Fortunately, (or maybe unfortunately) the only people who need to be impressed with this discipline are those who hold power.