Recent comments

  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 years 1 week ago Web link Don Stacy
    Starting in the 90's with the Clinton presidency such films as Independence Day, The American President, and TV programs like The West Wing, or The Commander in Chief that all purport to show vigorous, dynamic imperial presidents leading America. Coinciding with the ending of a 12 year long presidential drought and a pent up demand for a Democrat in the presidency by the entertainment media big shots. Unlike what the article implies "liberals" [sic] are totally fine with a powerful president provided that he's one of their own. Like was said of the Bourbon monarchy: They learn nothing and forget nothing.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 years 1 week ago Web link Don Stacy
    Amen to that Sam. TL:dr.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Don Stacy
    To repeat previous comments, I see this as a non-debate debate. Arguments over this, that or some other type of "libertarianism" are senseless at best, detrimental to those of us wishing to be free on down the scale. They smack of an indwelling and perhaps highly intellectual compulsion to direct and control my liberty, as well as the liberties of everyone else (in the "free society" that they'd like to be the ones to bring about). And to that extent I'll agree with White Indian. My agreement is conditioned by the mutual understanding (I think) that there is no problem with individual liberty or bein' free. That is a good thing. That's the goal of all of us here. The problem is with the "ism" and the "ian" of libertarianism. Be free. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Sorry, I can't get used to this Drupal "Edit" thingie. My original comment seems to have vanished; it was to thank Sam for his generous remarks and to concur that government-funded research tends to be suspect. It also said my source for the migration dates in the article was Spencer Wells as it says, and he's done some good work with DNA tracking.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    It's probably not so, but just in case any visitor to this page has been confused about the self-ownership axiom by the incessant ranting of WhiteIndian, perhaps a clarification will help. The 2005 STRticle by David MacGregor is a fine place to begin; "Self-Ownership: The Foundation of Freedom" at http://strike-the-root.com/51/macgregor/macgregor2.html . Another excellent introduction is Ken Schooland's superb, 9-minute animation, "The Philosophy of Liberty" at http://www.jonathangullible.com/mmedia/PhilosophyOfLiberty-english_music... These establish that the right of every person to own and operate his own life is absolute. Another Root Striker, Per Bylund, has probed the axiom a little further, to deal with the possible objection that "self-ownership" implies a dual nature, as in "I own myself" where "I" and "myself" are two different entities in the same skin, with the latter being some form of property. His reasoning is that on the contrary, the "selfowner" is an integral whole, a person whose very nature is to direct his or her own actions. That insight helps us further understand why the axiom is indeed undeniable; if the selfowner is prised apart somehow, the organism is damaged and becomes less than fully human. This close integration will be familiar to graduates of TOLFA, for in its first segment we deal with the question of whether a person can volunteer to be a slave, perhaps under a contract for sale, should he be so misguided as to wish to do so. Our conclusion is no, it's impossible; because at the instant before the alleged transfer of ownership he would be a self-owning human being, _and the instant after_ the alleged transfer he would also be a self-owning human being, and therefore the contract and transfer would be fraudulent or void; the buyer would in fact not receive the goods he had attempted to buy. The bond can't be broken; to try to forcibly break it would be like splitting a person into two physical halves, left and right.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    "...vast state subsidies...currently prop up such unsustainable systems [non-organic agriculture] and allow them to externalize their costs onto their organic competitors." ~ Evan Amen ["verily, truly"]
  • PECB's picture
    PECB 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Contrary to this article, quite a few Native American tribes, prior to, & extant to the arrival of Europeans on the continent practiced agriculture and had what we would call sophisticated governments (though many were arguably more Libertarian in nature -- and it should be noted those past Indian societal/governing structures in no way resemble the socialistic ceaspools that many surviving U.S. Tribal Govs. have become). If I remember correctly, the Iraquois ("Haudenosaunee"?? and some related tribes) in particular were quite sophisticated & very prosperous & practiced farming, hunting, gathering, and fishing -- and some historians have argued that the Iraquois' Political & Philosophical Ideas played a major role in shaping early European-American political thought (despite the settlers Eurocentrism & Bigotry) and in the drafting of the Articles of Confederation and eventually the U.S. Constitution. Unfortunately the two cultures did not have a peaceful coexistance for long (though from my reading; the Iraquois really did try, because they did see value in some of our ways and wished to united with the Europeans for mutual benefit. However, the extreme racism of many European settlers (especially those of influence) prevented this & the many diseases Europeans brought with them effectively wiped out the Iraquois. NOTE: Some current Indian decendants in Upstate NY claim to be Iraquois, trying to grab past glory maybe??? but I highly doubt it -- measles, small pox, & chicken pox is devastating to the uprepared immune system & wiped the Iraquois off the map & those that disease did not get, the blade and bullet later did in. And even if by some lucky chance there actually are direct Iraquios decendants, it is irrelevant as the Iraquis Culture & the potential it offerred is long dead. [As a foot note, so to speak, I'm note making a noble savage argument. I simply trying to give credit to what I view as a great tribe/culture/society that actually did achieve a lot and had a lot of potential, and were not savages. From reading about the Iraquois, I strongly feel that had they had an extra hundred years or so of being left alone, or had they gotten a foot hold as a culture a couple hundred years earlier, they very likely would have developed their own written language and various technological toys like metal working, wheels, true sea-faring craft, etc. As a matter of fact, the Iraquois' technical and intellectual precociousness with European gadgets and such bothered many European settlers, and they felt threatened by it.]
  • Evan's picture
    Evan 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    As far as I can tell, despite all his fiery rhetoric, it seems like WhiteIndian wouldn't mind if you engaged in agriculture, as long as it's "permanent," (i.e. permaculture.) This may seem paradoxical, because if "agriculture creates government," then wouldn't permanent agriculture create permanent government? But I digress, because while I disagree that agriculture inevitably results in government, I too see permaculture as a way forward. Permaculture is land-use design that seeks to work with nature, rather than against her, to create stable, productive environments that provide for human needs. Waste is transformed into food, work is minimized, and yields increase. I must strongly disagree with whoever it was earlier in this thread that predicted that a truly free market / free society would favor non-organic agriculture over organic farming, considering the vast state subsidies that currently prop up such unsustainable systems and allow them to externalize their costs onto their organic competitors. Permaculture is a tool that belongs in every good agorist's bag of tricks, and I would even go so far as to say that the success of the agorist strategy depends on how effectively agorists integrate the insights of permaculture into their activism. When it comes to individual sovereignty / personal autonomy, I have to say that I'm not a fan of the "self-ownership" terminology. I think phrasing it that way isn't very good marketing, and as a market anarchist, I think we should be marketing anarchy as effectively as possible. To some degree, I think a "taboo on ownership" (when it comes to land and other living beings,) is a good idea in that it's a peaceful voluntary way to promote a culture that values individual autonomy and maximizing liberty. Regardless of "legal status," I strive to be a good steward of the land and the plants and animals on which I depend, and I try to keep in mind the interconnectedness of everything.
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Aw shucks Sam, thanks. That is very kind. I am humble to learn from anyone. I think WhiteIndian's perspective is important too, even if I don't understand it completely nor agree with his conclusions.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Jim, this essay and those past ones of yours to which you link are examples of why I hold you up as a mentor in the discipline of self-ownership. I may not always totally agree with your facts (although one of the things I like about your writing style is that you are not a "fact-dogma" writer -- you suggest your observations and allow the reader to make conclusions), your presentations are informative and educational. Thanks for another #10 (my rating)! As Golefevre commented above, I can only speculate upon that which I have not seen with my own eyes and experienced with my own senses. I'm perhaps a few years older than most on here (76), and I look at it thus: I have a valid time frame of reference of somewhere more than 70 years. I have an older sister (80), and anything previous to 70 years ago that I think I recall is difficult for me to accurately discern from stories she has relayed to me about our lives in the mid to latter 1930's on the various farms. I can't be certain an event or object is actually something I remember, or whether it is something about which she or a peer has told me. Suffice it to say I'm limited in my active knowledge of time and space. When historians talk about "discoveries" indicating "man" as having accomplished this or that 10,000 years or so ago and longer I can only believe what I have the confidence to accept as far as their credentials and/or abilities to make those determinations (knowledge of and access to carbon dating, etc). And I'm acutely aware that the number of doctorates one has written has little to do with that human limitation of time and space. Education and "scientific" study helps one to be capable of locating tools to measure, based upon what "we" know here and now of carbon depletion (and presume it has always depleted evenly across time -- the key word being "presume"), but I still have to rely solely upon my confidence of "science", much of which is funded by parasites of state through stolen resources. I always have to laugh at scientific proclamations of distance in terms of "light years" and my confidence in any of their capabilities to grasp such tidbits of time/distance. As a professional truck driver I know something about cramming 862 miles of flat land driving into the white man's 11-hour daily drivers' limit on his log books, but light years???? I read once that light is supposed to travel at 186,282 miles per second -- (that's not miles per hour, mind you -- there are 3,600 seconds in an hour last time I counted). It's a good thing those guys are government funded I say. I do not disagree with White Indian's assessment of the historical blame for today's crises in food and economics. But I have to once again side with Golefevre: I only have today to become free. If I'm going to be free I have to become so with the cards I hold in my hand today. I don't have time for hand-wringing about how it came to be this way. I only have to proceed with what I know. And Jim, your essay has improved what I know to become free. Thanks! Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    (I hit the "post" button twice -- this is to erase one of the entries. Sorry)
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    State level politics is the way things are. Libertarian types constantly refer to how things "could have been" or "should be." Are libertarians the ones you refer to as "forever bitter and hateful?"
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Fascinating! Thanks for the explanation.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    I agree, well said. People imprisoned by the way things "could have been" will forever be bitter and hateful. The outlook "to live as sovereign as possible and not participate in politics" is as good as it gets IMHO.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Golefevre: "...I don't see any need to romanticize any aspect of history and I certainly can't get sentimental about what I haven't witnessed. I can, however, look to live as sovereign as possible and not participate in politics. This, in my opinion, is the way forward: divestment from the immoral and failing state. We see examples of this more often every day in agorism or market anarchism as Jim suggests here. We are not human because of the state but in fact human DESPITE the state..." To that, were I of religious bent, I would shout, "..AMEN!" Well said. Sam
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Benjamin Franklin describes a White Indian who abdicated a "good Estate" to live a Non-State lifeway, as follows: When an Indian Child has been brought up among us, taught our language and habituated to our Customs, yet if he goes to see his relations and make one Indian Ramble with them, there is no perswading him ever to return, and that this is not natural to them merely as Indians, but as men, is plain from this, that when white persons of either sex have been taken prisoners young by the Indians, and lived a while among them, tho' ransomed by their Friends, and treated with all imaginable tenderness to prevail with them to stay among the English, yet in a Short time they become disgusted with our manner of life, and the care and pains that are necessary to support it, and take the first good Opportunity of escaping again into the Woods, from whence there is no reclaiming them. One instance I remember to have heard, where the person was brought home to possess a good Estate; but finding some care necessary to keep it together, he relinquished it to a younger Brother, reserving to himself nothing but a gun and a match-Coat, with which he took his way again to the Wilderness. ~Benjamin Franklin Philadelphia, May 9th. 1753 James Axtell has a whole chapter in the following book describing such White Indians, as follows: Chapter 13. The White Indians The Invasion Within: The Contest of Cultures in Colonial North America by James Axtell Oxford University Press http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/HistoryAmerican/ColonialRe... The White Indians of Colonial America by James Axtell The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Jan., 1975), pp. 55-88 Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture http://www.shsu.edu/~jll004/colonial_summer09/whiteindians.pdf
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    John: "...but must admit to misgivings about what life without government will be like..." Try it. You might like it. Sam
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Strictly out of curiosity, why pick the name "WhiteIndian"? Is there some significance to that user name?
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    You despise agriculture which is certainly a very scientific industry, yet you quote scientific studies. I'm not sure if that is contradiction, but it is a bit odd. Yes sir, there is plenty of food in the world and people can in fact feed themselves. Feeding oneself is a time-honored necessity. I'm not convinced that I "suffered" because I was able to trade for two over-easy eggs, wheat toast and a piping hot cup of coffee this morning.
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Are you really going to claim there is plenty of food now? Seriously? Billions of people in agricultural civilization are either starving or suffering major food insecurity, and even those "well-fed" at the center of empire are suffering from agriculture with Diseases of [agricultural] Civilization. High stress is endemic to the civilized population. It has become the leading cause of death in the United States. At the same time, while one quarter of U.S. citizens suffer from some form of mental illness, one would be hard-pressed to find any examples of mental illness among foragers. Thesis #21: Civilization makes us sick. by Jason Godesky | 2 January 2006 http://rewild.info/anthropik/2006/01/thesis-21-civilization-makes-us-sick/ P.S. Not only maladies like diabetes are diseases of civilization; Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, MD relates how Schizophrenia is a disease of civilization. Schizophrenia and civilization Torrey, E. Fuller http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=acls;idno=heb02208
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    "Nobody holds the view that North American natives never had State level governments." Well, okay--perhaps I misunderstood you. Apologies. The finer point is that I think you are falsely blaming agriculture. When thieves became too lazy to work as highwaymen, they invented the state, IMO. Are we really going to complain that there is too much food now? Seriously?
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Nobody holds the view that North American natives never had State level governments. There have been several agricultural civilizations and agricultural chiefdoms rise and collapse in North America, and I've referred to them, several times. And I've referred to "The Great Law of Peace" and how their Egalitarian Non-State sociopolitical typology influenced American ("all men are created equal") and then French politics (liberté, égalité, fraternité,) as described in "Indian Givers: How the Indians of the Americas Transformed the World" by Jack Weatherford.
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    The view that native peoples on this continent didn't have governments is a bit more interpolation that I think we can do with the evidence. Pueblos of the Anasazi indicate that some cities of the Anasazi were of significant size (likely in the 100K+ range for some in Colorado, for example). Other ruins suggest that city or nation states of natives were hiding from one another, possibly during a time of conflict over scarce resources as Jim suggests (strictly speaking as a layman here, of course). Other evidence suggests the Iroquois may have greatly influenced the U.S. Constitution. It is much easier to sit around philosophizing when you have a few jars of beans stored for eating later rather than foraging with every spare moment for calories. Did agriculture lead to the rise of the city states that became the the nation states we suffer today? Sure, absolutely. We've become ever more productive and as any thief knows, you don't steal from your poor neighbors, you go to where there is wealth to plunder. I don't see any need to romanticize any aspect of history and I certainly can't get sentimental about what I haven't witnessed. I can, however, look to live as sovereign as possible and not participate in politics. This, in my opinion, is the way forward: divestment from the immoral and failing state. We see examples of this more often every day in agorism or market anarchism as Jim suggests here. We are not human because of the state but in fact human DESPITE the state.
  • Gwardion's picture
    Gwardion 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Actually it was caused by the bronze age. Haven't you wondered what the forges that made the hundreds of thousands of bronze swords and such used as fuel? The forests were destroyed to quarry rock and to smelt metals. Also to build the tens of thousands thousands of ships that the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, etc. used. I am sure agriculture played a part, but the forests took their biggest drop when they were being clear cut for fuel for the forge fires and timbers for the ships. Not saying agriculture doesn't destroy things when done improperly, but stating as a definitive something that is not so weakens your argument.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 4 years 1 week ago
    I Can Do It; You Can't
    Page Paul Hein
    "Our rulers will become corrupt, our people careless... the time for fixing every essential right on a legal basis is [now (1784)] while our rulers are honest, and ourselves united. From the conclusion of this war we shall be going downhill. It will not then be necessary to resort every moment to the people for support. They will be forgotten, therefore, and their rights disregarded. They will forget themselves, but in the sole faculty of making money, and will never think of uniting to effect a due respect for their rights. The shackles, therefore, which shall not be knocked off at the conclusion of this war, will remain on us long, will be made heavier and heavier, till our rights shall revive or expire in a convulsion." ~ Thomas Jefferson in “Notes on the State of Virginia”, Query 17, p. 161, 1784.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    "This method was a cheap and effective method of slow death. The victim was bound and buried up to his neck near an ant hill. A sweet substance, usually tree sap, was poured over the victim's head. He was then left to be slowly eaten by the ants. this method was used by Native American tribes and sometimes involved a second captive who acted as a witness. The witness would see what kind of death the victim suffered and was allowed to go back to his village to report what he had seen. This was supposed to act as a deterrent of further white settlement. However, this usually produced quite the opposite effect and angered the whites."
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    And look at what a few thousand years of agriculture did to the "Fertile Crescent." Vast cedar forests of Mesopotamia have been transformed into the Iraqi desert. Agricultural city-Statists call it "improving the land." Now that's rubbish.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    John, it would be nice if an anarchist society were perfect, but I don't know anyone who makes that claim; rather, it is just by far the best possible form of society. Any time one person enforces his will upon another, there's a government in miniature. It may happen. That's why a justice industry will arise. http://www.strike-the-root.com/81/davies/davies4.html shows how I think it will function.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    "Some say that intensive agriculture is wrong, that it "rapes the earth..." ~ Jim Davies Don't they say that because "intensive agriculture" depletes the soil, which is, in turn, propped up by the use of carcinogenic petrol-chemicals, which pollute the waters, the flesh of animals (including humans), etc.? Hasn't it been proven that the food produced by this "intensive agriculture" far less nutrient-dense than the food grown by the Amish?
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 4 years 1 week ago
    1492
    Page Jim Davies
    Of course it wasn't all Garden of Eden in America before the government-loving Europeans arrived. The natives frequently fought with one another, and torturing people from another tribe to death seems to have been a favorite pastime. I am second to no one in my loathing of American government today, but must admit to misgivings about what life without government will be like.
  • Jerry J Brown's picture
    Jerry J Brown 4 years 1 week ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    This may be a great solution...http://www.getalookatthis.com/2008/06/30/radical-new-tire-design-by-michelin/
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    The idea that human minds can be swayed by information is daunting all by itself. The nature of government (a small number of sociopathic human beings exerting coercion upon the masses -- mostly non-sociopaths) is undergirded by this actuality. It's been that way throughout history. All "public media" is devised to make use of the fickle nature of the unwashed masses. But you know all that. That's part of the reason "capitalism" always reverts to "corporatism" (and why on sites like this one we who should know better are led to fight and haggle over the "evils of capitalism" -- a strange phenomenon in itself when you consider STR is pro-liberty). Media information is edited to lend support to "the state" (the real predators of society), who are dependent upon the large producers (lobbying corporatists) who rely on and seek legislation for the elimination of competition in the marketplace. I am emotionally fragile and easily swayed. At least that's the way I'm SUPPOSED to be. And sometimes that's the way I am -- but the web has opened avenues of previously inaccessible information and new doors of understanding for me. I'm not the same man I was ten years ago. In 2002 I was still clinging to a certain degree of statist mentality. But I'm not unlike many folks, I just want to be left alone. In safety. I'd like to know I can relax at home and ride my bicycle without fear of (non government) predators. The internet has shown me the main threat to my families' and my safety is government predators. Therefore the internet MUST be smashed. And it WILL be smashed. State parasites will see to that. Laissez faire must not be allowed into the heads of the proletariat in anything other than a negative light. It is essential the masses chant slogans of freedom; but they must not be allowed to catch a glimpse of freedom. Watch the video. It tells a valid story. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    Guest Editor
    Story strike
    Evan: If WI, or any other dissenter, is banned then I will lose a lot of respect for STR. I'll second Evan's observation. If I can't learn from dissension without projecting threats or rudeness I might need to find another milieu. Sam
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    War Street Journal's usual plea for the Owner Class. War, rape, and plunder of Mother Earth and her Non-Owner children must not stop for anything. This reminds me of the Libertarian crap about smoking not causing lung cancer, in defense of the brave tobacco heroes. They'd rather murder the planet, somewhat like Ayn Rand stupidly killed herself with smoking.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 years 1 week ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    About a decade ago when I lived in WA the idea was floated in the state leg that high school grads should have to take a test that would indicate "objectively" [sic] what they really knew or had competence of and that the test scores would be put on the grad's diploma for all the world to peruse. Then some suggested that the members of the state leg should have to take this test also and have their scores next to their line on the ballot. Heh. The enthusiasm for mandatory tests with published scores idea quickly faded. More to the point I think it would be a great idea to have not just politicians but cops, bureaucrats, military types, and all corporate bail-out recipients take and have published drug and alcohol tests. Corporate welfare recipients are just as worthy of that sort of scrutiny as the single mom who gets food stamps, eh? We could call it the "What's in your bloodstream?"Act modeled after the Capital One credit card ads ("What's in your wallet?"). Fair is fair, eh? Why should one group of welfare recipients be singled out for humiliation but not the others?
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    The drug war protects The Owner Class' privation property values against you-guess-which-race "aggressors." "In short; RACIALIST SCIENCE is properly not an act of aggression or a cover for oppression of one group over another, but, on the contrary, an operation in defense of private property against assaults by aggressors." ~Murray Rothbard "Cops must be unleashed, and allowed to administer instant punishment ... unleash the cops to clear the streets of bums and vagrants. Where will they go? Who cares?" ~Murray Rothbard
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Westernerd
    George Carlin made excellent points and died an untimely death. The things I believe need to take place for one to be free of the matrix, however, are two: 1) Recognize that which is seen and that which is not seen. The "real owners" have ALWAYS been "that which is not seen". Not so much back in the days of the monarchy and the king, perhaps, but certainly with the advent of the genius scheme of "democracy", which created the illusion of participatory government so that the concept of "state" could become a tool of unseen but gigantic wealth for the few who understand how to play one factor against another. Thus you have corporatism -- the vying for political connection to declare perpetual war against competition and genuine profits. Understand ALL monopolies are set up BY predators under the guise of "our government". The old "anti trust" scam was just that -- scam. Quit blaming "free markets" when the state is organized to quash such a phenomenon in the bud. 2) Cease playing into the matrix. Don't volunteer for anything having to do with state. Don't "register". Don't vote. Don't voluntarily "file" thievery....er, tax "returns". I've been on the US federal books as an "illegal tax protestor" for 34 years, since 1978. Go ahead and take "your" social security and/or government and/or veterans' pensions. If you can't steal from thieves, whom the hell can you steal from, I say. I'm not taking "your" tax money -- it was stolen from you and gone from your hands long before I ever laid my greedy eyes on "it". But I never sign "petitions" or contact parasites of "congress" for additional "benefits". And, since I'm an "illegal" (tax protester, that is -- although I've never "protested" any taxes that I know of) I don't get "stimulus checks" when they bribe the sheep with resources originally stolen from them. In fact, I recommend you practice recognizing the language of statism and slavery and start utilizing the vernacular of freedom: America does not incarcerate more citizens per 100M than any other "nation" on earth -- America is the threat against the freedom of all natural persons. Gangsters (agents) OF America lock natural persons away for victimless "crimes". If you're going to be sovereign and free you've gotta act free. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    Social Cooperation
    Web link Westernerd
    This guy laments about the absence of a "free market": http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=B_FncAQsAJg#!
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Westernerd
    OK, Indian. I'll agree that over the years I've felt compelled to engage in "semantic game" of a sort to become free in my head. As a matter of fact that was what was required, I think, to finally break through and declare myself as "...a sovereign state.." States exist. They have borders. They have armed and often psychotic gendarmes to enforce the borders they have chalked out for themselves. Now the white man in this part of the world (referred to as "The U S") has taken it upon himself to build a gigantic (and laughable) fence down in my neck of the woods -- typically encroaching upon property "rights" (as though anybody had such things as "rights") and dozing across "private" ranches to build the fool thing -- to impress the masses that he is "taking action" (ha ha ha). Poor soul(s). "Get-Out-The-Vote!" I am a sovereign state. I have borders. My border enforcers are not psychotic and they are not armed, but those internal border guards do exist. They will react decisively when and if one tries to cross my borders without my explicit permission. But I quit "...rebelling against the State..." once I saw the light to declare sovereignty. I recognize the advisability to live in peace with the "family of nations" that surrounds me. Like the folks in a place called Switzerland, I have no need to be at war with the individuals of any other nation. I'll agree with Dr. Paul on that score -- why go to war when you need to make ends meet at home? And I do appreciate the compliment(s). Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    Social Cooperation
    Web link Westernerd
    Indian: But you're not free in the holistic sense of the word. You're definitely not free to gambol about plain and forest to live a millions-of-years successful Non-State lifeway. You and I agree in that. I might NEVER be free to "...gambol about plain and forest to live a millions-of-years..." First of all, I'm 76. I'm gonna die one of these days. Now if you're of a religious bent you might say that if I'm "good" I'll be wafted off to "heaven" and live forever on streets paved with gold...(why gold? -- don't ask). But I'm more realistic than that, and that's why I ride a bicycle everywhere when I could well afford to drive a nice automobile. It keeps me from being enslaved in a nursing home. Second, there's precious little "...plain and forest.." on which to gambol about. I've got to be content with the ice-covered and snow-packed streets of the city for now. I've given thought to moving back down to my native Fayette County, TX (500 miles south of Dallas) where the streets and highways stay clear year-'round, but I choose to stay in Ioway close to family and friends. That's the price of free choice. I call myself the richest man in our town because few 76 year-olds are in as good physical or mental condition as I. That's why the "I AM THE 1%" bumper stickers on my bikes. I work because I want to work, not because I have to work. But I do see your point -- and it's well taken. There are and will always be limitations to my freedom. If no other infringements to freedom I'll have family responsibilities that keep me from always doing my own will. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    Social Cooperation
    Web link Westernerd
    I need to add one more thought: I get the feeling from your posts, Indian, that you have a general mindset that states that nobody can be free without changing the behaviors of others. That I cannot be free living within the boundaries of what has definitely become a police state -- with government incursions on our right and government incursions on our left. My understanding of your posts hints that, due to the egregious and tyrannical behaviors of all those who engendered "Agricultural City-Statism (civilization)", and due to the fact I live within the fictitious boundaries of those tyrants, I cannot be free. That due to "corporate greed" I'm a slave. That's where you and I disagree. "Corporate Greed" is an interesting term when you analyze it. It fits the classic example of state agents concocting a "problem" then creating the illusion with the shapeless masses they are "on it" -- that they are working diligently to solve the "problem" (they created in the first place). "Just vote for me and I'll work to expand government to regulate them bastards!" The poor working bloke never comes to understand s/he would be better off if s/he would Abstain From Beans (and stay out of unions that are incestuously yoked with "the government"). Remember: the idea of "corporation" or corporate status is a government sponsored enterprise (GSE). Corporations cannot exist without government franchise and the political connect and favoritism that goes along with it. That's what corporatism is all about. And I am powerless to change it. But get the poor sheep chanting, "Corporate Greed! Stop Corporate Greed!" While they piddle away their productive efforts into the coffers of the concordat between government agents and politically connected "business" (men). I'm personally convinced -- and I could be 'way off base on this -- that genuine freedom comes to the individual who recognized his or her powerlessness to change ANYBODY. I can exchange information and opinion with you. And if I'm willing to keep an open mind I can gain deeper insights and make internal changes from the posts you write. But change you? Unless you showed an openness to change I'd do better attempting to shift the north wind. "If it's going to be, it's up to me". Through the mutual (and free) exchange of ideas and information we might -- and certainly do -- have an influence one upon the other. But my freedom is not dependent upon you or your approval or agreement. Be free. Sam
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago Web link Westernerd
    Neoteny. You don't show much. (That's a compliment, Sam.) Now look around you. If you aren't familiar with the word, it's defined and analyzed well in the following article: "...Humans from domesticated cultures also show the same neotenous behaviors so often found in other domesticated animals..." Re-Wilding Humans by Jason Godesky | July 30, 2007 http://rewild.info/anthropik/2007/07/rewilding-humans/index.html
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    Social Cooperation
    Web link Westernerd
    Indian: There is no "free-market" in civilization that isn't founded on lots of aggression. Agricultural City-Statism (civilization) is built on a pile of skulls and leaves a Trail of Tears. Sounds like a tale of woe to me. But that's no doubt the way you see it, and if that's the way you see it, that's the way it is. For you. On the other hand, in any "society" there have been free men and women. There were Jews in Nazi Germany and in the Warsaw Ghetto. They're the ones who wore no yellow arm bands, engaged in no "uprisings", neither made pacts with the enemy nor turned in or narked on fellow Israelites. Some eventually escaped, many died. But death is not a symptom of a lack of freedom. 100 years from today you and I will have died. I will have died free. I don't know about you. As long as you put the term "free market" in quotes, I presume you may not die free. Angry, perhaps, but not free. Sam
  • WhiteIndian's picture
    WhiteIndian 4 years 1 week ago Web link Westernerd
    States, cities, crews, bands, marriages, pods, troops, and other social relationships are not fictions. All primates, and all mammals, most vertebrates, are social animals. It's just a silly semantic game to say social relationships do not exist in any specie. You're rebelling against the State because agricultural city-Statism (civilization) forces egalitarian-evolved humans into a hierarchical Mass Society to which less completely domesticated humans like you (that's a compliment, Sam) are poorly adapted.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Jad Davis
    From "Non-State and State Societies (pdf) linked by Indian: Today less than 0.001 per cent of the world's people live outside of the direct control of state societies. Now I see I'm gonna need to change the bumper snickers on all my bikes (I became car-free a couple years ago). Instead of the: "I AM THE 1%" they will need to read: "I AM THE 0.001%". Doubt if I can ink that in. Will need to have 'em reprinted. Indian: Q: How many humans in history have felt compelled to go around informing everybody that they're somehow free? I don't know if you are referring to me, Injun; but if you are, I'm not "compelled to go around informing everybody I'm somehow free". I might suffer from indwelling compulsion, but I'm not going around anywhere. I'm sitting right here telling you I'm free. Notice I didn't say "somehow free". I said free. There is a distinct difference between being free and being somehow free. Ask me about that difference some day. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Westernerd
    I'm a believer that in each of us is a smidgen of hope. Anthony is young yet -- he may yet see the light and change his writing style to reflect the illegitimate nature of "the government". "The government" is a fictitious entity when you think about it -- only individuals ACTING in the NAME of supposed "government" exist. But as I typed a few minutes ago on another thread, many of them are dangerously armed in addition to being sociopathic. I always believe a sociopath with a gun. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago
    Social Cooperation
    Web link Westernerd
    Indian: Capitalism is white TAKER (thievin') culture. "Free-Market" is a masquerade to whitewash brutal aggression. I'm convinced ALL "ism" fits that category. When you put "free-market" in quotes I'm assuming you are implying "free" as overshadowed by predators claiming to be agents of state. That's "bond". Individuals mutually consenting to exchange -- whether items or ideas -- tend to avoid aggression (although I recognize there can be thieves walking around freely who do not sport state costumes, tin badges, and are not dangerously armed and touting claims of legitimacy). Free-market thieves (those without the costumes, tin badges and claims of legitimacy) are easily distracted through cooperation between consenting marketeers. I might be wrong. Challenge me. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Westernerd
    Indian: Without cities, there is no state; with no state, there exists no cities. States and cities are imaginary -- illusions. Borders are fictitious lines in the sand. State does not exist. Only agents claiming to BE state exist. But they are dangerously armed. I always believe a man with a loaded gun. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 years 1 week ago Web link Westernerd
    Ah, yes, Indian. But drug dealing (along with prostitution) are about the only free markets left. Long live the pushers and the ho's!!! Once you deal with the fuzz, the rest is marketable. Sam
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 4 years 1 week ago Web link Jad Davis
    One of the technical problems, even with these new upgraded programs, like the one we have here, seems to be that they cannot follow/comprehend/differentiate concepts very well. For example the one we have here cannot seem to follow/comprehend/differentiate the simple difference between "not being a member" of a gang, and "being free" from attack by the gang. Pretty lame. (Now, it will probably "screen scrape" the word "lame" and lob it back, because, after all, it is an "abuse" program, obviously.) Anyway, thanks again. It is easier to ignore it, knowing that it is just a poorly written abuse program. (Watch it "screen scrape" the word "abuse", now.)