Recent comments

  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 6 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I wouldn't be in any position to argue against any of the late-night radio shows' "evidence" from expert guests and call-in participants. There well might be folks who are "exploring us", and who have come near to "communicating" with "us". And there may well be reasons that the psychopaths-that-be don't want to disseminate the "truth" to the hoi polloi. Conspiracies of this sort are just part and parcel of that egregious idea encompassed in "the state". I'd be interested to discover if any of the Voyager expeditions launched by Carl Sagan and his associates have born fruit. He was a believer in the natural potential that there must indeed be other "intelligent life" somewhere out there in the vastness that is our incomprehensible universe. Nice topic for discussion, Alex. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 7 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Sam:   I would only add to your input that the prima facie evidence of other advanced lifeforms is, evidently, already here.  Unless, of course, the above-cited incidents are in fact entirely fabricated.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 7 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    The fact that we're discussing this under the presumption that only the brainless idea called "government" would be the culprit insofar as "withholding information" pertaining to "unidentified objects" is evidence of the total saturation most of us have suffered under what we like to call "statism". None of us were born with an anarchist spoon in our mouths. Thinking logically -- outside the "statist box" -- has been a totally new feeling for many of us. And "government" (psychopaths who deign to rule) fairly well have a handle on the financing of huge scientific projects -- including evidence of the phenomenon that usually elicits an emotional response -- the-theory-of-evolution. I began to question "science" many years ago. Any time that word is placed in quotation marks -- or is used as a noun -- as if "it" were a living, breathing entity -- brings me to question. Because most of what we know as "science" has been accomplished in some manner with stolen (tax) resources one way or another. That does not mean that I question the scientific method of reason. I'm a science teacher (in a previous life). I'm merely saying "we" don't know a lot about "our" universe. My favorite "scientist" was Carl Sagan. Of all people, he knew the likelihood of other forms of life that must be present somewhere in the vastness of space. He just hadn't been able to discover one or more of those forms of life before he died at an early age. I suspect he died of unorthodox faith in the "science" of medicine. Who knows -- perhaps one day "we" will find that there ARE many other forms of life -- possibly much more advanced and intelligent than "we" are -- somewhere in the light-years (are there such things as "dark-years???" :-]) away from earth. Hopefully, that will be after "discovery" will no longer be in the hands of deep-pocket psychopaths. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 7 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Guys:  I hadn't thought about the Space Force rollout -- interesting.  Of course, anything the USG (or any other current government) can put into outer space would be zero military match for technologies such as those displayed by these UFOs.  But the timing is definitely suspect.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 year 7 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I've been pondering this question as well, Alex; with the same skepticism. The nature and purpose of this psyops are still uncertain to me. I can't figure out if 1) they have really been hiding information proving the existance of aliens among us and are just now leaking it out before the big reveal or 2) they are creating a false narrative to make us believe that there are aliens here and now. Either way, my guess would be that the global warming and terrorism memes are losing momentum as tools to generate fear among the populace about problems too-big-for-the-little-guy-to-handle such that only international institutions (i.e. World Government/UN) can cope with them. Or maybe it was just the "Space Force" roll-out. You can be certain, as you stated, that the reason is not for honorable purposes.
  • Gwardion's picture
    Gwardion 1 year 7 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    If you are looking for patterns..... a Space Force? Maybe connected?
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 year 8 weeks ago Page S.E. Seachman
    Thanks for providing this excellent series of articles, Steve.   "It has everything to do with cultivating institutional privileges while distracting people from what matters." Well, that sums things up very nicely.   Your comment about critics being anti-profit reminds me of much of what I hear from vaccine critics. They embrace the Marxist notion that the profit motive is to blame for the rapacious vaccine industry. In reality, it is the socialism that is so devastating, but it is often difficult to get this point across to non-libertarians. Odd that the idea of selection bias never came up in your statistics class. I had an excellent professor for my first semester of probability and statistics and he was constantly reiterating that you needed "a representative sample" when doing statistical analysis.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 9 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    My "exhaustive study" places the "rubicon" at 1. I don't mean "1%". Probably more like ".0000000---0001%". In actuality, using the linked article's assessment ("How Many People I'll Need on My Side"), the answer is 0. Zero. I've discovered I can be free. Here. Today. Where I'm "at". Now. I truly hope you'll join me. But I don't need even that for me to be free. Your freedom is not a requirement for my freedom (nor is my freedom a requirement for you to be free) And that, my dear friends, appears to be where this whole she-bang went astray and STR participation fell to a small handful -- where we once had dozens and dozens (many genuine "heavy-hitters", but also many, many freedom seekers who wrote no erudite essays and who did not always agree with you or me or anybody else posting on this site). "Society" is I. Or, I am "society". Actually, "society" (like "government" and/or "the-state" and/or "our-great-nation") is an idea, not an entity. "Governments" and "states" are very bad ideas. On a brighter note -- it's nice to see you reviewing some of the older articles that made STR great. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 9 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Newly published related article places the "rubicon" at more like 25%:   https://futurism.com/social-change-tipping-point/    
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 year 9 weeks ago Page S.E. Seachman
    This is a really good article. I have been trying to get a better understanding of how college costs have spun out of control and have not really seen a lot of good analysis of the topic. As I read this through, I noted a number of parallels to the dysfunctional (to put it mildly) government vaccine program. Just like parents who are college graduates are strongly inclined to send their kids to college, most people who were vaccinated as kids are inclined to subject their kids to vaccination. In the latter case, the parents think that since vaccination was of benefit to them (or at least, that seemed to be the case), then it will be of benefit to their kids as well. They do not take into account that the vaccine schedule has tripled over the last 30 years and that it is currently producing vastly greater harm than when they took relatively few vaccines. Licensing and mandates are also critical components in the current vaccine mania. Parents feel a false sense of reassurance going to licensed pediatricians, who utilize FDA approved (licensed) drugs/biologics. They think that all of these economic blockades (as the author put it so well) are actually there for their own protection, so that they won't have to worry about "quackery". Then, of course we have the vaccine mandates which most parents mistakenly believe must be complied with in order for their kids to attend school. Little do they know that the government vaccine program has been built on a foundation of fraud and coercion.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 12 weeks ago
    One Percent
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Great points, all.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 12 weeks ago
    One Percent
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    I concur, Mark.  Instant gratification is the touchstone concept of modern society.  I also think you make a salient point in your conclusion.  Thanks for your perspective.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 year 12 weeks ago
    One Percent
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    A 1% reduction in spending, however inadequate, is not politically acceptable, probably for a couple reasons. First, if it were to happen and business would go on as usual, it would beg the question "Maybe we can cut the budget by 5% or 10%, or even more, without adverse consequences". And that is not a thought that the political class wants people to entertain. Second, and probably more importantly, in the political world, the laws of economics have (apparently) been suspended. We can have our cake and eat it too. There is no real awareness about what all of this runaway spending is REALLY costing us (i.e. in terms of opportunity cost). That will change eventually, but in the interim an incredible amount of damage is being done. There is no real incentive for politicians to be more fiscally responsible: quite the contrary.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 year 12 weeks ago
    One Percent
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    One-percent is likely a high estimate, IMHO. My expectations of a general awakening to the joys and benefits of liberty, much less a rejection of the state, decline daily. The ability to think abstractly does not appear to be a common trait while the desire for tangible, immediate results appears overwhelming to the few who can and do. As long as the median time preference for the general population is a matter of days, weeks or even months as opposed to years, or preferably decades, the dominate social order will be based on obedience, compulsion and violence. Our best hope for a voluntary society free of this statist cult is a remnant of liberty-lovers surviving the predictable collapse of the existing order. Keep preaching to the choir, Alex, because the size of this remnant will be important in determining the structural design of future reboots of the social order.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 12 weeks ago
    One Percent
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Sam, good to hear from you again, in turn!  :-)   I would hope that I made clear in this short piece that I'm entirely in accord with everything you and the late Mr. England have to say above.  My purpose was to draw a stark illustration for the fence-sitters, while addressing the initiated also.    
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 12 weeks ago
    One Percent
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Nice to see you back "on board", Alex. And interesting topic. I've been re-reading our old friend, Delmar England (died 2010, per Per Bylund), "Mind and Matters, The World in a Mirror". https://commonsensical.liberty.me/mind-and-matters-the-world-in-a-mirror... Here's a prefacing quote from Chapter 8: "...To speak of a governmental system is to speak of a specific segment of earth wherein the inhabitants are controlled by a certain person or persons. The segment, always established by physical force, is usually called a country or nation. The primary philosophy is physical dominance. The will to power is an insatiable appetite and those controlling each segment are forever fearful for their “security”. Every alliance of two or more segments is seen as a threat. Counter alliances and weapons buildup are necessary precautions that instills fear and insecurity in others. This fuse is always burning, sometimes slowly, sometimes swiftly, but always the psychological condition of escalation is present and operating..." He goes on to outline the reality that there is no such thing as "reducing government": "...So, let us be clear from the outset. When someone seeks to control, limit, or reduce government, what they are clearly saying is that they wish to direct the centralized coercive force to compel all others to conform to their personal values, to act for their personal benefit, i.e., to claim ownership of all other individuals..." The Paul of the world may appear to mean well. But the phenomenon we like to call "government" will never be anything other than coercion and violence and war. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 18 weeks ago
    The Wonder of Words
    Page Paul Hein
    "...(The master also had guns and overseers.)..." And that, my dear friends, is the essence of "jurisdiction". I've said for years that the only legitimate governing agency is the family unit. All others are coercive interlopers, with the only advantage of loaded firearms -- nothing else. This, of course, is simply because each of us -- all newborn human beings -- arrive on earth totally dependent upon adult caregivers. Hopefully loving Moms and Dads, although all-too-often to "single-parent-jurisdictions" (homesteads). Whether you agree to it (or like it or not), if you are a parent you are "in charge". You've gotta keep the infant clothed, sanitary, fed and comfortable. And loved. The governance of love. Can't be beat. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 18 weeks ago
    The Wonder of Words
    Page Paul Hein
    This is one of your best, Paul! Since I gave up internet at home over a year ago (interfered with my bike riding regimen) I have to copy to flash drive on the computer at the government ("public" ha ha) library, for later reading at home. Which is what I've done. However, along with what you've observed as the trickery that causes the hoi polloi to think of themselves as "citizens" and "taxpayers", I've been wading through the late Delmar England's "Mind and Matters...": https://commonsensical.liberty.me/mind-and-matters-the-world-in-a-mirror... It's long, difficult to read (England used complicated sentence structure). But worth the time. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 19 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    More and more, Paul, when I go back and attempt to decipher things I've written a week or a month back, I also miss my own point. Your essay was good, and think I was merely picking at lint. At least I don't remember what point I was attempting to make at the time. Regards, Sam
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 1 year 20 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Any government thug who tries to enforce this order should be dealt with the same as any other violent criminal.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 year 21 weeks ago Page S.E. Seachman
    Good article. I have a saying: given enough time, all human institutions turn to shit. I wrote something that agrees with the points made here: http://strike-the-root.com/how-i-got-job
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 year 21 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    I guess I'm missing your point... are we disagreeing about something? I like the free market too - even if it is imperfect, and sometimes slow, and even if people attempt to manipulate it (mostly by making it less free). My solution was found in the free market...
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 1 year 21 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Too bad the author states, "To be clear, no one here is advocating for people determined to be mentally unfit to be able to possess firearms."  The Second Amendment makes no such exception, nor should it, as doing so is a clear path to tyranny.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 22 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    "...Because I prefer to not engage in discourse with people inclined to make comments like the ones I quote above, I generally abstain from posting here..." Calinb, I too prefer to not engage in discourse with naysayers. They bore me. That said, I'm determined not to allow any commenter(s) to suppress my quest for liberty and freedom. Nor will I allow cynics to censor my prerogative to express myself. I think Paul can say the very same thing; and am inspired by his continuing to post essays and comments at STR. Even when I do not totally agree with him. Jim and Paul and I have in history enjoyed each others' web interchanges. We've also spatted and sparred a bit (especially of late). I truly hope I've learned from the crossfire. I want always to be able to disagree without being disagreeable. And that's what I think you're trying to get across here. However, abstaining from interacting with others will not strengthen the forum. I truly wish many of the old-timers would return and "buck up" -- not allowing 'em "...to get'cha down...". Sam
  • calinb's picture
    calinb 1 year 22 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    "Your long and welcome absence from this site had encouraged me to suppose that, the owner having declined to eject you, you had quit on your own. Sorry to see you back." "Sam, I have indeed wished that Paul Bonneau be banned from writing anything on STR, and I repeat that desire here and now with all the emphasis at my command." Jim, I've been lurking on this site for many years. Because I prefer to not engage in discourse with people inclined to make comments like the ones I quote above, I generally abstain from posting here. However, I very much wish for you to know that your contributions have never changed my mind about anything (changed how I think) but Paul Bonneau's words have done so! Also: "I cannot prove that he is a government agent provocateur, but my opinion is that he is." I have followed Paul's writings from long ago on the Montana Alliance for Liberty Yahoo group and I highly doubt that your assertion is true. In my opinion, his work passes a "Turing Test" for anarchism. If he is a government agent provocateur, he is a very ineffective one!
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 23 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Don't know that I totally agree with your concept regarding the marketplace. If I were to invest in manufacturing a product "...guaranteed to rid you of (say) wiffles...", yes, I would perhaps feel threatened if wiffles were to become suddenly non-existent. However -- if you were to purchase my wiffle treatment with poor results (the wiffles continue to persist and aggravate), I would feel threatened that you and many others would be no longer willing to buy products manufactured by me, since I failed to produce what I promised to produce. In other words, I believe in the marketplace -- a free marketplace. Of course, I recognize few of us have ever experienced what we'd like to call "free" markets. And it's the "free" market in which I believe. Were I to lobby gangsters operating under the guise of senators and "representatives" to pass laws and regulations limiting or blocking other manufactures from producing wiffles, then I would fall into the category of your dandruff shampoo people that relish the proliferation of dandruff to "treat". Were I to have no competition it would be to my advantage to make certain that wiffles remain strong. And there might be still enough goof-balls who would buy my product that failed to do as advertised to keep me putting out anti-wiffle products. I see the medical establishment in this latter light. AMA and their parasites are always in the top 10% of lobbyists. It seems that the rapidly diminishing local family doctor is the only medical producer to have an interest in genuinely wanting to see you get well. And s/he is often holistic in her approach. Much could be discussed regarding this, Paul -- please don't take this as criticism of your essay. Sam .
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 23 weeks ago Page Paul Hein
    You've exposed the ultimate in social engineering, Paul. Where I work, the set of restrooms in the back have the men's room entrance on the right, but in front the men's room entrance is on the left. The other night I decided I'd better pee before biking home, and inadvertently entered the ladies' room -- immediately, I sensed I was in the wrong bathroom (it was a busy night at Wally-Wolrld). :-[ Well, I'm happy to report I was mortified. I hope always to be embarrassed if I ever make such a blooper again. Sam
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 1 year 25 weeks ago
    When Will It End?
    Page Paul Hein
    Sounds like smart people over at ZH - 2 for 2 is pretty good.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 1 year 25 weeks ago
    When Will It End?
    Page Paul Hein
    When I read a site like zerohedge.com, I'm heartened by the overwhelming rejection of gun-control arguments following this latest school shooting.  Just so I don't get too happy, I'm saddened by the overwhelming rejection of the idea of open borders.  Lock 'em up and toss 'em out is the attitude toward immigrants at ZH.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 year 25 weeks ago
    When Will It End?
    Page Paul Hein
    I've recently taken up watching Chinese, Korean and Japanese romantic comedies on Netflix with my wife. It's nice to see actual chaste behavior on the idiot box, strange as that may sound. You don't end up feeling dirty after watching it. It may be there is some censorship going on to maintain this, or the culture is not as degraded as ours is, or a combination of the two. I don't know, but I like the result. As to school shootings, they sure are convenient for advancing the ruling class aim to disarm the peons. However, it's not going to work. Americans are arming up. If the parasites manage to touch off a war, that will be the end of them.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 25 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Probably should include this article I found here as well:   https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2018/02/20/using-the-best-data-possible-we-set-out-to-find-the-middle-of-nowhere/?utm_term=.017d5d6f9dc0    
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I don't think that we can assume that drug testing will necessarily be very expensive in a free market setting. We really have no idea if there are far superior models for evaluating drugs than the FDA-mandated one. We need a market in order to determine how the testing ought to work and what it will cost. I am not sure about how copyright should work.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Oops, I meant to reply to you but created a separate new message instead.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I agree with many of your points.      . The cost of bringing new drugs to the market is, without question, heavily distorted by government rules, allegedly in place to ensure quality but, like many or most government rules, of questionable cost-effectiveness (at best) or counterproductive (at worse).      . The true cost of drugs is obscured by government influenced, if not mandated, practices of paying for them.      . Other more cost-effective theraputics might supplant many expensive drugs now being prescribed, if the market weren't so distorted.   On the other hand,      . Even if we stipulate that the vast majority of new drugs introduced are worthless or worse, I would assert that some fraction are life-saving, a real boon to mankind.      . Even if we streamline the qualification process, removing all rules other than truth-telling (not over-hyping how safe a drug is known to be, etc.) for marketing a drug, for example, the process of testing a new drug will be very expensive.  This can be mitigated to some extent by performing human trials on people who are dying and eager to try anything, aware of the risks, but it will still be very expensive.      . As time goes on, it will become increasingly easy to maufacture any particular compound, which will make it easier than ever to make a cheap profit off someone else's work.   "Should we wring our hands or simply accept the verdict of the market...?"   Is that how you feel about copyright too?  Should I be able to sell and profit from the spreadsheet program you wrote rather than writing my own?  I think unique new drugs should be protected in much the same way copyrighted works are today.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "I don't want to defend the crony-capitalist practices of today's drug companies, but if we want a continued flow of new life-saving drugs, then the huge effort it takes to bring a drug to market must be rewarded by some form of protection." There are many assumptions built into this statement which may not be warranted. First, do we want these drugs? Well, we really can't answer that question in the absence of a real market, where consumers willingly pay the full price for these drugs out of their own pockets. Second, do we actually already have a "flow of new life-saving drugs"? The evidence is that few new drugs are life-saving, most only suppress symptoms, and many have been shown to be harmful and lethal. Third, even if we were to concede the 1st 2 points, is it really true that "the huge effort it takes to bring a drug to market must be rewarded by some form of protection."? Maybe the huge effort and expense is actually just a form of protectionism, to keep less lucrative therapeutics off the market, since they cannot afford to run the FDA gauntlet. Maybe if we had a system of competing private firms certifying drugs and other therapeutics, it could be done much more quickly and efficiently, and would not require monopoly prices to underwrite such an effort. But, let us suppose, that even in an environment where competing private firms were operating that it might sometimes, if not often, be cost prohibitive to produce new drugs which are profitable absent patent protection. What should we make of this? Should we wring our hands or simply accept the verdict of the market, that such drugs have failed the market test and that our resources toward improving health or fighting disease should be allocated elsewhere?
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    My views mirror yours, Alex.  My favorite example is a spreadsheet program: if I write and sell one, nothing prevents you from writing and selling a program with all the features mine has, but reasonable copyright prevents you from making money selling the program I wrote.   Where should the line be drawn between something that is protectable and something that is not?  In my view, the criterion should be that a work is complex enough that it is ridiculously unlikely (say, odds of one in the number of atoms in the universe) that it might be duplicated by chance by someone else.  Thus a book would be protected but a book title would not (same as now).      I also agree that patents are illegitimate, both in terms of the simplicity of ideas they protect and in the method by which they protect them, which discourages rather than being neutral or encouraging competition.  In contrast, by protecting individual works, copyright encourages competition.  But if we sweep away patents, some of what they now cover needs to be carried elsewhere.  I don't want to defend the crony-capitalist practices of today's drug companies, but if we want a continued flow of new life-saving drugs, then the huge effort it takes to bring a drug to market must be rewarded by some form of protection.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    As always, I appreciate your input and analysis, Sam.  :-)  Thank you.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Good topic for discussion, Alex. And well thought-out. "...With the recognition then that, if such practices still existed in freedom they would do so purely as a product of markets and free enterprise, we must then ask the obvious question as to whether individuals would be entitled to such protections at all..." Key words here (as I see them) are "entitled" and "protections". If you invite me for a visit into your home, are you "entitled" to be "protected" from my crapping on your floor or being rude or unkind to you and/or members of your family??? Of course, if you didn't know me well enough to discern that I'm not one who would so engage, you would probably not extend the invitation in the first place. Caution is prudence. You summed it up well in your final paragraph. Since none of us have experienced "true freedom" (with the possible exception of yours truly :-]) it's up in the air as to exactly how many of these "rights" will be protected once uncivil government is finally exterminated. Because there will still be, for example, "unfit" parents (is the newborn "entitled" to be fed, clothed and kept clean???). With the advent of the internet and compooterization, where it has become so easy to copy & paste, I try to be vigilant with myself and give credit for quotations and things that make sense to me -- to provide "links" where appropriate. But, as in your example of the wheel, I suppose nothing I say or write is totally, 100% original with me. Someone at one time in my life taught me to say, "Ma-Ma". I did not originate the term, but I use it (my dear Ma-Ma died in 1996). So discernment will probably rule in many cases, and there will always be some who will steal ideas and concepts without intending to remunerate whoever took the time and effort to produce them. And you might have to hunt 'em up and gun 'em down. Sam.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Well done. I greatly regret not homeschooling my daughters.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Outstanding, Paul.  A great success story well told.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago
    The Purchase
    Page Paul Hein
    Very nicely done, Paul.  Kudos.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Sam, I think you and others like Paul are very much keeping the raz-a-ma-taz alive, and it's good to see.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Paul, I had forgotten about this one.  It's a great one.  Concise and accurate.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    An excellent response, Sam.  Thank you.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi misochu:   Skyler J. Collins is in Salt Lake City, he of http://everything-voluntary.com, and numerous Mises Institute-backed publications.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Paul:   I think I remember you mentioning Wyoming a while back, and its pros and cons as a Liberty Location.  I was aware it is the least populated "state" (tax farm), and so, strictly from a standpoint of sheer sociological pragmatism alone it has its advantages.  Vermont is second place in that category (albeit in a much smaller geographical area), and Alaska is third.
  • mishochu's picture
    mishochu 1 year 26 weeks ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Cool, somewhere in Utah has got to make the list, obviously not SLC, but somewhere. Granted, they do love that drug/alcohol war.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 26 weeks ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Thanks for the reminder, Paul, of one of your better contributions. Too bad STR has had to become fallow and not conducive to the good raz-a-ma-taz discussions we had back then. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 year 26 weeks ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...tyrant thieves who have the tacit support of society..." And therein lies the heart of the matter. As long as this condition exists you and I will indeed have to scrap and fight (much of the combat taking place betwixt each of our very ears) in order to be and remain free. There is a huge and daunting demand for authoritarianism out there in the marketplace. And if there is anything those of us at STR understand it is the law of supply and demand. As long as individuals "register" and "vote" the apparent demand will remain strong. I long for the day they hold an election and nobody shows up. That's why it is important for you to continue to comment and write wherever you see the opportunity. And everyone else here and at the precious few other anarchist forums on the net. I'm not certain what it's going to take to make significant erosions in that demand. I'd like to see it in my lifetime. Yet, the growth of internet freedom and genuine free thinking engendered therein shows the way. It could be happening before my eyes, but I'm too prejudiced toward my own dogma to recognize it. As you've seen me write, I was probably more stimulated to investigate freedom once I became free of alcohol within AA (still perhaps the most libertarian organization in town), lo those many years ago. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 year 26 weeks ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    http://strike-the-root.com/why-people-believe-government-is-here-to-help-us