Recent comments

  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 hours 21 sec ago Web link Emmett Harris
    I agree with Paul -- if you're going to carry, carry. That might mean having to procure your piece on the black market. Good for you. I support "the black market" wherever and whenever I can. I foresee a time in the (I suspect) near future when virtually all markets will become "black". It's called "TEOTMSAWKI" for those cyber-savvy individuals. The reported incident occurred at Florida State (which is doomed anyway). The "lawmakers" should come take a look at our school prior to the big debate. Our students bring guns to school whenever they wish. Of course we're a homeschool family. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 hours 22 min ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Paul: "...'Our' judges are all impartial, aren't they?..." Don't know how many "judges" you have, Paul. I have One -- Who is Impartial as I understand it. I haven't been "judged" yet as far as I can tell. I should be in a position to tell you more indisputably in 30 years or so. Or so I'm told. I don't know that for certain. I'm a skeptic when it comes to religious and/or "scientific" proclamations. I had a judge once. He diagnosed me as "pathological nonconformist" (as he sentenced me to 30 days in jail for drunk & disorderly, the rat). Later he asked me to be his AA sponsor. I did that until he died several years ago now. We often laughed that I never asked him to retract his sentencing statement -- I think he stood solidly behind it until the end. What comes around, goes around. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 hours 43 min ago Web link Government Deni...
    Thanks, Mark. And I truly appreciate the inspiration you've been to me over the years -- and to the Hale Bobbers (or what's left of 'em since they moved over to "facebook"). Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 hours 17 min ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Kleck responds: https://www.saf.org/journal/11/kleckfinal.htm Of course one can guess what exposure Kleck's work has in the organs of the Ministry of Propaganda, compared with Hemenway's. The only problem with Kleck's approach, that I can see, is that it is utilitarianism. People should carry guns, if they please, no matter what the Constitutions, or the law, or the research says about it.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 hours 7 min ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Laws are for peons, not the ruling class. Oh, sorry, I forgot that this privilege is supposed to buy judicial "impartiality". Our judges are all impartial, aren't they?
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 12 hours 39 min ago Web link Government Deni...
    I hear you Sam and agree with you about the whining, but can't really offer any actionable solutions as an alternative.  I can only promote peaceful patience and deliberate preparation for the state's inevitable implosion.  I appreciate your diligence and energy. 
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 day 4 hours ago Web link Government Deni...
    Feel like I'm whispering to myself any more whenever I visit STR. But that's probably just as well. Because I'm getting bored to tears of "libertarian" whiners like Tom Dispatch wailing and gnashing teeth over malfeasance of "the government". I truly believe those types simply cannot see "the government" as a mindless abstraction, a group of psychopaths, who are simply acting out their indoctrinations. "...More tax dollars consumed, more intrusions in our lives, the further militarization of the country, the dispatching of some part of the U.S. military to yet another country, the enshrining of war or war-like actions as the option of choice -- this, by now, is a way of life. These days, the only headlines out of Washington that should surprise us would have “narrowing” or “less,” not “broadening” or “more,” in them..." And what, dear friend, would one expect from a "District of Collectivism"? The whining and nagging is simply affirmation of the lunatics of state's proclaimed "jurisdiction" -- same as political "voting". I'd better get back on my bike and shut up -- beautiful "January thaw" in this barren north country. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 days 51 min ago Page Tim Hartnett
    From "Protection/Submission": Want protection? Protect yourself and your own, or join vigilance committees to do the same thing, or submit. Those are your only choices. I tend to steer clear of vigilance "committees" -- generally all "committees" for that matter. I ain't about to "submit" (voluntarily). I agree totally with your two essays -- and Joe Sobran's "Reluctant Anarchist". It's sad that Sobran's life was cut short before he could totally assimilate anarchy. He was on his way. I am a sovereign state. And yes, those psychopaths hiding under the guise of "government" merely engage in protection rackets, held together by obfuscation. They rely solely upon a phenomenon well known to psychopaths, but only recently labelled "Stockholm syndrome". "Voluntary Compliance". The khans, forerunners to "Our-Founding-Fathers", understood well the terror and fear villagers had of the Huns and nomadic hordes. So it was relatively easy for them to begin the process of setting up what we later called the "family of nations". A major stroke of genius was "democracy" -- the ruse that the masses could actually be above the overseers "elected" (appointed, for those of us who under the reality of the political process) from among them. That those senators and legislators and ministers and presidents would become subservient to "We-The-People". The jive of "terrorism" is particularly humorous to those of us who see through all the dots. How "9-1-1" was actually pulled off is something none of us will ever really know. But, as you infer, "uneasy rides the head that wears the crown". Even totally disarmed (complete "gun control"), the hoi polloi present an ever-present risk. What if all of us become non-compliant at the same time? So, from that point of view, my use of the phrase "monopoly upon violence" fails. Because those presumably "in charge" must constantly keep the critical mass happy -- even those in max-lockup. The majority must always be persuaded to "pledge allegiance to the flag", to be "law-abiding-citizens". Most of our contentions here and at other anarchist forums are disagreements over definition. I've observed for many years that the only legitimate governing unit is the family unit. All others are interlopers. There is no such thing as "jurisdiction" that I don't voluntarily hand to those proclaiming such. Of course I always believe a man with a loaded gun. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 4 days 8 hours ago Page Tim Hartnett
    "Theirs is a monopoly upon violence." Sam, I will pick one nit with you here. See my article, "*What* Monopoly on Force?": http://ncc-1776.org/tle2013/tle707-20130203-12.html I agree "it's in the cards". Perhaps you've seen my other article, "Protection Implies Submission": http://www.ncc-1776.org/tle2010/tle564-20100404-04.html As to the original article, I couldn't agree more. This point however, got my attention: "No decent person can begrudge the police their grieving anger when two innocent ones get slaughtered over controversies they had no control of." Are there any innocent police, after all? I guess I don't see it, because the occupation of police work is inherently objectionable. Perhaps that means I am not a decent person.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 4 days 8 hours ago
    'Tis Folly to Be Wise
    Page Paul Hein
    I guess I missed the cranberry scare. A good thing, because I eat a lot of cranberries. Mencken had the appropriate remedy for this problem: "Here (in America) the daily panorama of human existence, of private and communal folly, the unending procession of governmental extortions and chicaneries, of commercial brigandages and throat slittings, of theological buffoneeries, of aesthetic ribaldries, of legal swindles and harlotries, of miscellaneous rogueries, villanies, imbecilities, grotesqueries, and extravagances is so inordinately gross and preposterous, so perfectly brought up to the highest conceivable amperage, so steadily enriched with an almost fabulous daring and originality, that only a person born with a petrified diaphram can fail to laugh himself to sleep every night and wake up with all the eager, unflagging expectation of a Sunday-School superintendent touring the Paris peep-shows." Things will go on as they have been going, until they make a head-on collision with reality. In the meantime, get some entertainment out of it.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 3 days ago Page Tim Hartnett
    This bears repeating: most tend to ask the wrong questions, thus expect impossible solutions to what appear to be "problems". As if the white man's "legal system" could be improved if they'd just somehow straighten out their acts. And, of course, we on the street have little contact with a power elite who arrange bread-and-circus events ("elections"). All we see is the egregious grunts on the street with state costumes and tin badges which are supposed to convey "jurisdiction" to the unwashed masses. Due to this "jurisdiction" those lunatics seldom go up for any real punishment for murder and mayhem. Because if, for example, you're in MS and happen to be black the psychopaths have a case if they say they have a case -- no matter the law or the charge or the evidence. Theirs is a monopoly upon violence. They make laws, enforce laws, prosecute laws, hire prosecutors, license "defense" attorneys, pay "judges", build jails, contract jails to private entities, employ and pay "wardens", employ and pay guards, employ and pay "parole officers". All with stolen resources. Good work if you can get it. So I don't spend time wailing or gnashing teeth over monopoly "police" misdoings. It's in the cards. Try to stay out of their way -- and never, never speak to one of them. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 4 days ago
    Economics for Dummies
    Page Paul Hein
    This was written almost six months ago. I was still in the trucking business (Retired August 8th) and apparently let it slip by me. Since it is one of Paul's usual excellent articles I'll make a late comment -- not that folks appear to be standing in line here at STR to make comments these days. In fact, I'm truly surprised that nobody -- nobody -- took the time to congratulate Paul and make remarks on another exceptional essay. It's a good commentary on "economics". For years I taught in the field of social science, and remember at times experiencing eerie feelings that I was teaching trifles when there were important things for college kids to discover. Only now do I grasp that "social science" is truly oxymoronic in nature -- pitiful tripe engineered to make certain that none of the undergrads would ask politically incorrect questions once they transitioned to the workplace from academe. Appear to be all-knowing, sound erudite, and shut up. The essence of central planning and entry level management. I had a lot more to say about this. But for now I'll head back into my cave. Nice article, Paul. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 5 days ago Web link Westernerd
    See also http://www.lewrockwell.com/2015/01/paul-craig-roberts/false-flag/
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 1 week 5 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    If the rule of law wasn't so completely elapsed I'd celebrate this. Federal snoops will do whatever the hell they want, and never mind whatever Minnesotans may want. We all know it too.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    I'll withhold my "vote" on the good cop/bad cop debate until the folks over at FEE provide an ancillary debate: "Good Monopolies Do Exist/There Are No Good Monopolies". As kids in government ("public" ha ha) schools, we were taught that monopolies are bad, that they make the fat-cats rich. "We" need government regulation and "anti-trust" laws to keep the rich from becoming super-rich. Many years later I came to see what should have been obvious at age 5: that tripe was taught by psychopaths who make up the most egregious monopoly on earth (and in the history of the earth). Monopoly cannot occur in a free marketplace. "Fat-cats" can only be made rich through "regulation" by those same lunatics hiding under the umbrella called "government" -- the very folks who provided the curriculum and forced us to attend their "schools" (and/or "schools" regulated by them) under threat of violence. Then taught us monopolies are bad. Think I'll head back to my cave now. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 6 hours ago Web link Emmett Harris
    As long as the term "policy makers" exists in the vocabulary of the hoi polloi, I submit there will be no "joy" in "flation" -- only "mo-flation". Unravel that while, as Paul Hein might suggest, you dwell in your cave. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 7 hours ago
    'Tis Folly to Be Wise
    Page Paul Hein
    "...it’s the people outside the cave who, in blissful ignorance, mistake shadows for reality..." Your essay, Paul, prompted me to pull out my copy of "The Driver" (Garrett), and his vivid description of the Easter parade: "...past the blacksmith shop, past the sandstone quarry, past the little house where the woman was who waved her apron with one hand and wiped her eyes with the other, out upon the Easting Highway toward Washington, with the Easter chimes behind them. And for what purpose? Merely this: to demand from Congress a law by which unlimited prosperity and human happiness might be established on earth..." Your essay aptly portrays how eerie it is to creep outside the cave and try to be a part of the unwashed masses long enough to procure sustenance -- then return to the sanity of the cave. The enormity of the truth is incredible. Good work, Paul. Sam
  • calinb's picture
    calinb 2 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    >It’s true that NAP may be useless in resolving a debate with a socialist, but so is everything else. Yes. I also find it to be nearly impossible to debate a statist who frankly admits "it works for me" (the state). At least such honesty permits one to not waste time on a decidely and likely permanently violent individual. (They commit violence via the proxy of the state.)
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 2 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    I'm a Pagan - what you might call a "Neo Pagan," and what I call a "Pagan Scientist." (yes, it's a sort of play on xtian science, by design) The only thing I bought on Black Friday was a pack of cigs and $5 worth of gas. . . so I spent a whopping $10 that day!
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    S/he would have to be a blind soul to not observe the incestuous relationship between psychopathic religious and government leaders. The entire winter solstice season just passed are livid examples of that connection -- year-after-year, century-after-century, from the beginning of recorded history. Keep-them-cards-and-letters-comin'-in. Fight decreased tax and tithe revenue common to the winter doldrums. Keep the hoi polloi chanting and jangling slogenry through it all. Don't be a grinch. Sam
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 2 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    Regardless of what a person calls themselves - Christian, Hindu, Zoroastrian - if they camp out in front of a store, waiting to buy the latest technological gewgaw - their One True God is. . . Mammon, the God of Stuff . . . and they just need to come to terms with that.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 2 weeks 4 days ago
    The Source
    Page Paul Hein
    Move to rural northern Michigan with tools and supplies and try to gut it out.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 3 weeks 6 days ago Page Mark Davis
    "The last thing we want in such an exchange is a frontal attack."  Paul, this essay was not meant to be a frontal attack, if you want to use military terms; it was intended to be a strong defense against a frontal attack.  As my first and last paragraphs should make clear, I was seeking to provide my brothers in arms with inspiration and support to withstand this attack as we are being assaulted from all directions with the weaponized term of "selfishness".  It is the progressives who have mounted a full out attack on libertarians.  Of course, I'm all for using the Socratic Method of asking questions and keeping an open mind, even trying to be "mild mannered" when discussing ideas with misguided souls.  Actually, I do that most of the time as I assume most people are interested in exchanging ideas and seeking the truth.  However, when a self-righteous progressive prick responds to being cornered by these gentle arguments with an irrational attack on their favorite stawman complete with the typical name calling, I advocate responding with a little more vigor.  Perhaps you have the patience of a saint and/or suffer fools better than I, but I don't think timid responses will convert many of the hard-core statists that are attacking us using the tactics you deplore.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 4 weeks 3 hours ago Web link Emmett Harris
    "The Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association’s directive for police to respond with at least two patrol cars is also creating a manpower shortage that’s delaying response times to non-emergencies like burglaries or car crashes to as much as four hours, according to the paper." Their response speaks volumes. What a bunch of wusses. I guess the III% guys will not have any problem with them when the Revolution starts.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 4 weeks 3 hours ago
    The Source
    Page Paul Hein
    "With country after country wallowing in economic depression, with high unemployment, and endemic business failures, what can people do but turn to a bright, shiny new government to make the whole world better?" Buy a battle rifle and a case or two of ammo, and practice your marksmanship skills.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 4 weeks 3 hours ago Page Mark Davis
    " if you are more comfortable being a cog in the machine..." Somehow I expect that putting it in these terms is not going to convert anyone. While I believe your essay is correct in its main points, I also believe it will not help. The last thing we want in such an exchange is a frontal attack. "The goal of all writing...is to find and communicate the truth about an experience or subject. The purpose is never to make points or win contests; the writer should not attempt to 'sell' himself or herself, and certainly should not be interested in selling ideas to anyone. No writer of deliberate discourse should try to force readers to accept opinions not based on evidence, and the writer should not make an elaborate show of presenting 'both sides' of some presumed argument to readers, while ignoring the facts." -- Dr. Richard Mezo "When, in the course of studying a long series of military campaigns, I first came to perceive the superiority of the indirect over the direct approach, I was looking merely for light upon strategy. With deepened reflection, however I began to realize that the indirect approach had a much wider application - that it was a law of life in all spheres: a truth of philosophy. Its fulfillment was seen to be the key to practical achievement in dealing with any problem where the human factor predominates, and a conflict of wills tends to spring from an underlying concern for interests. In all such cases, the direct assault of new ideas provokes a stubborn resistance, this intensifying the difficulty of producing a change in outlook. Conversion is achieved more easily and rapidly by unsuspected infiltration of a different idea or by an argument that turns the flank of instinctive opposition. The indirect approach is as fundamental to the realm of politics as to the realm of sex. In commerce, the suggestion that there is a bargain to be secured is far more potent than any direct appeal to buy. And in any sphere it is proverbial that the surest way of gaining a superior's acceptance of a new idea is to persuade him that it is his idea! As in war, the aim is to weaken resistance before attempting to overcome it; and the effect is best attained by drawing the other party out of his defenses. This idea of the indirect approach is closely related to all problems of the influence of mind upon mind - the most influential factor in human history. Yet it is hard to reconcile with another lesson: that true conclusions can only be reached, or approached, by pursuing the truth without regard to where it may lead or what its effect may be - on different interests. History bears witness to the vital part that the 'prophets' have played in human progress - which is evidence of the ultimate practical value of expressing unreservedly the truth as one sees it. Yet it also becomes clear that the acceptance and spreading of their vision has always depended on another class of men - 'leaders' who had to be philosophical strategists, striking a compromise between truth and men's receptivity to it. Their effect has often depended as much on their own limitations in perceiving the truth as on their practical wisdom in proclaiming it. The prophets must be stoned; that is their lot, and the test of their self-fulfillment. But a leader who is stoned may merely prove that he has failed in his function through a deficiency of wisdom, or through confusing his function with that of a prophet. Time alone can tell whether the effect of such a sacrifice redeems the apparent failure as a leader that does honor to him as a man. At the least, he avoids the more common fault of leaders - that of sacrificing the truth to expediency without ultimate advantage to the cause. For whoever habitually supresses the truth in the interests of tact will produce a deformity from the womb of his thought. Is there a practical way of combining progress towards the attainment of truth with progress towards its acceptance? A possible solution of the problem is suggested by reflection on strategic principles - which point to the importance of maintaining an object consistently and, also, of pursuing it in a way adapted to circumstances. Opposition to the truth is inevitable, especially if it takes the form of a new idea, but the degree of resistance can be diminished - by giving thought not only to the aim but to the method of the approach. Avoid a frontal assault on a long-established position; instead, seek to turn it by flank movement, so that a more penetrable side is exposed to the thrust of truth. But, in any such indirect approach, take care not to diverge from the truth - for nothing is more fatal to its real advancement than to lapse into untruth. The meaning of these reflections may be made clearer by illustration from one's own experience. Looking back on the stages by which various fresh ideas gained acceptance, it can be seen that the process was eased when they could be presented, not as something radically new, but as the revival in modern terms of a time-honored principle or practice that had been forgotten. This required not deception, but care to trace the connection - since 'there is nothing new under the sun'. A notable example was the way that the opposition to mechanization was diminished by showing that the mobile armored vehicle - the fast moving tank - was fundamentally the heir of the armoured horseman, and thus the natural means of reviving the decisive role which cavalry had played in past ages." -- B.H. Liddel Hart, "Strategy" Bottom line, we should either not debate at all, or ask (embarrassing) questions about the opponent's position - while putting such questions in as mild and unchallenging a format as is possible. Only way I know of to do that in a way that is not patently insincere, is to not be too settled in one's own position, and asking with an open mind. By "not debate at all" I mean explicitly making the point that we hope the opponent is able to get the world he wants (putting it in as unjudgemental terms as possible - that is, terms he would use) while saying we'd rather not be a part of that world ourselves. No need to explain even why we'd rather not. FWIW I know how hard it is to act this way, and frequently fail in that respect myself.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 weeks 2 days ago Page Mark Davis
    Sorry to be late weighing in, but appears that not many have come crowding in with essays, so yours is still on top. Your usual sound, logical thinking, Mark. There appears to be a chronic and universal fear of total self responsibility. And it's not limited to liberals, or what they're wanting to call "progressives". I always like the way Harry Browne put it: Conservatives vs Liberals Conservatives say government cannot end poverty by force, but they believe government can use force and threats of violence to make people moral. Liberals say government cannot make people moral, but they believe government can use force and threats of violence to end poverty (redistribute wealth). Neither group attempts to explain why government is so clumsy and destructive in one area but a paragon of efficiency and benevolence in the other. ~Harry Browne Liberty A-Z p 35 Sam
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 6 weeks 19 hours ago Page Mark Davis
    Terrific essay, Mark! Filled with pithy, quotable truths and with a clear and honest view of things. Nicely done!
  • DP_Thinker's picture
    DP_Thinker 6 weeks 4 days ago Page Mark Davis
    Excellent article! Definitely succinct and thoroughly clear in putting the criticisms of both the socialists and the let's not forget power hungry fascists that seek to rule everyone else. I would also add another quote by Mahatma Gandhi that came to mind as I was reading this "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they attack you, then you win." It would seem to me that we are at the attack stage. So even though we may have entered a new chapter in the anti-libertarian mindset, maybe we are closer to victory than we thought!
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 6 weeks 4 days ago Page Mark Davis
    Mark, you've crystallized it here!  Fantastic job!  I just finished having another one of these fruitless debates with a hardline (and now Blocked) socialist on Facebook.  Time to spread this essay far and wide!
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 6 weeks 4 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    "Acted on wrong information". Most raids I presume are warrant collected via un-vetted caller is who unknown. At a conjecture, I'll guess at least 80% plus. "Jury fails to convict". Well I'll be damned. My ongoing question is shouldn't the judge be the one held liable? He is the one signing the warrant. Since there is no evidence that the current tyrannies are going away anytime soon, I must concede that all LEO's undergo intensive psychological evaluations, and each enforcement agency develop and implement an accountability training which would be ongoing. Will that really solve the problem? "Television isn't helping..." I would like to join in here and say it is, because I think maybe LEO's are watching Jack Bauer and imitating, filling out their fantasies. How many here have, in their very youthful state played "cops and robbers". I am guessing most of us actually wanted the cop role? Fighting back doesn't appear to be a safe method, given that the DOD has been, for years doling out armored cars, bayonets and etc. Enforcement agencies are becoming heavily armed. Who wants to see a tank rolling down their driveway?
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 6 weeks 5 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    Paul, I wonder when people will start fighting back?  When they decide that they have nothing to lose because the cops are already so heavy handed, I suppose.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 6 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Yes, Sam, insanity IS the social norm. I have to say that some of the womens' stories in this sorry Cosby drama are more detailed and (to me) believable than you suggest, but whether he's guilty or not, the tactic you describe works fine -- just as the Reichstag fire "worked" for the Nazis no matter who started the flames and the 9/11 attacks "worked" for the neocons regardless of who the perps were. Keeping the public focused on trivia, minor scandals, and small-time individual criminals does wonders to keep attention off the Big Picture crimes being carried out daily but ignored by the media.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 6 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    You've hit the nail on the head, Paul: an economic crash -- a REAL one, an end-of-the-world sort of crash -- might get people to actually rethink things, although I wonder how many will come to reasonable conclusions. In any case, we've got a crash like that coming right up, apparently. My guess is it's coming in the next few months, or possibly later this evening. Wish I thought the results would be positive.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 6 weeks 5 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    The police in Japan typically don't carry guns and are more like community service officers than law enforcement like we have here.   They are friendly, polite, educated and try to get to know the people in the area that they are working.  Tokyo has millions of people in a small area, yet it has the crime problems of a small rural town in America and you almost never notice cops beause there are so few.  The Japanese have very strong family and neighborhood ties which helps keep crime down and little need for police.  The police are glad to help with lost and found items and give out directions to tourists with little interest in making drug busts or getting macho.  The policy of surveying people twice a year is looked at as a courtesy for getting to know the people in a neighborhood and it is voluntary; you can say "no" you don't want to talk to them and they will smile, thank you and go away.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 6 days ago Page Glen Allport
    The "allegations" against Cosby are obvious divide-and-conquer piffle. Cosby has been lampooned and scuttled. Groupies scorned are loose cannons indeed -- and none volunteer as to why they "happened" to be in his room 10 or 15 years ago, or for what. You make good analogies here. Keep the hoi polloi wigging and wagging about alleged sex malfeasance by prominent and successful individuals and they will never waver from their celebration of the most evil, murderous group of psychopaths known to man. Insanity is, without question, the social norm. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 6 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    Once one sets out to make sense out of monopoly state lunatics, she has succumbed to the insanity that brought it all about in the first place. Abstain from beans, my friends. That might appear to be a small step. But it is a step. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 6 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Of course it's important to note that the "letter" is to the beast that is addicted to war as the bulwark of its "health". Letters to those psychopaths who make up "Bundestags" and "Reichstags" and "Parliments" and "Legislatures" et al., have about the import of a letter to Santa Clause. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 6 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    Addendum: I referred to the old "This I Believe" radio show, with Ed Murrow and his jangling of the 50's -- on which I cut my eye teeth (and eventually had to exorcise in order to acquire liberty and freedom). But in googling after my comment I see there is one still on the web. I strongly suspect that none of the "beliefs" we've shared with each other here at STR could ever see the light of day on their site. I'm sure they only accept collectivist, teary-eyed pablum that passes for conventional wisdom amongst the unwashed masses -- that which supports, aggrandizes and promotes legitimacy of the chicanery of psychopaths organized under the mantle of "state". But don't let this dissuade you from giving it a try. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 6 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    First I'd like to welcome you aboard, Shaquille. There have been a number of "gun control" theses, and you present a good one with your own distinct analogy and set of references. STR needs new essay writers (although there are still many willing to "take the heat" and continue to make good presentations). I see with not a little angst many sites that previously stood for true freedom and liberty sort of falling by the wayside. I strongly suspect a part of that might be the push for "NAP" (non-aggression principle), which may have spilled over into a general reluctance on the part of freedom lovers to to "aggress" by submitting comments that might be construed as criticism, or as bringing the substance of an essay into contention. And, without controversial essays and lively debate, sites like STR quickly become fallow and risk demise. I recall a few essays (particularly those with "g-d" or "religion" in the topic) that elicited well over a hundred comments and wrestled on for weeks or even months. More than one packed up his glove and ball and left the playing field -- not a very "libertarian" approach, but happened nonetheless. From the essay: "Obviously by virtue of their occupation, criminals do not obey the law..." Second, I think it is important that one identify in her own mind what "criminal" is. Because (imho) there are free market criminals and there are non-free market criminals. The non-free marketers are the dangerous ones -- the ones most of us find ourselves blogging about. They are those who claim (by their armaments and their increasing willingness to use them on "..their own 'citizens'..") to exclusively possess a substance so many like to refer to as "jurisdiction". And if they have you convinced in your own heart that they indeed possess that magical substance -- that they represent "our" government -- their mission is 95% successful. I submit that the human family is the only legitimate governing unit. You start your essay with that analogy (then relate it to central "authority" as in the u.s. district of collectivism). Unlike most animals, newborn human beings are totally dependent upon adult care and supervision -- hopefully with loving and dedicated Moms and Dads. Although we encounter horror stories of moms or dads who have flung their newborn into a well or manhole, 99% of Moms would never think of withholding their breast from their cherished newborn. We swaddle them and protect them and prevent from danger -- those children we love. When you become a parent you have jurisdiction, whether you like it or not. It is a jurisdiction of love -- the only true and authentic jurisdiction. And that jurisdiction extends on out for a number of years. The Statlers sang a line in one of their songs, "...things get complicated when you get past eighteen..." As a matter of fact, genuine jurisdiction has a way of reversing itself in time. Ever now and again libertarians will come up with the topic for discussion, "...do parents own their children..."? And that, of course, always elicits opinion from all sides. Because, as Thomas Pynchon is credited with having said, "...If they can keep you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about answers." In time -- and in enduring, loving families -- the children ultimately inherit jurisdiction over elderly parents. Two of my daughters (I have seven kids -- five now over 50) have conservatorship over my accounts. That's done in our culture for a number of reasons -- one (and primarily) as a "legal" tactic to keep the white man's fingers away from the cup cakes. So I often badger them, that one nod to the white man and they can have me locked away forever and forever! Genuine jurisdiction, as I said above, is a jurisdiction of love -- and trust. In the world tomorrow -- after human government systems have been bankrupt and skuttled -- jurisdiction and legitimate contracts will be those based upon trust. This I believe. (Anyone here old enough to remember those old "This-I-Believe" radio shows?) Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 6 days ago Page Glen Allport
    "What will it take to get people to re-evaluate the positive views they have been taught since childhood about the most destructive force on this Earth – coercive government, an organization defined by its coercive and thus criminal nature?" An economic crash ought to do it.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 6 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    "Without external pressure, meaning the penitentiary, common and unconnected citizens will continue to be preyed upon with impunity." Well, either that, or just respond to the attacks in kind. I suspect it will end when the economy crashes and people become tired of being preyed on.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 6 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Thank you Germans. Heaven help us against the mad beasts in Washington DC. Is it time for a 50-state secession yet? We don't want to wait until the missiles start flying...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 6 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    If I read this right, you seem to be accepting the premise that the rulers intend to protect us, while questioning their ability to do it properly. The premise is wrong. Far from wanting to protect us, their major project is to act as a parasite on us. Parasites do not protect.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 7 weeks 3 days ago Web link Mike Powers
    As usual, the wrong question is presented. "The law" has nothing to do with anything. Voting at elections in support of Psychopathic monopoly is the culprit. Psychopathic prosecutors have a case if they say they have a case -- no matter the law or the charge or the evidence. Grand juries are rubber stamps. Theirs is a monopoly upon violence. The collectivist hordes called "Leviathan" make laws, enforce laws, prosecute laws, hire prosecutors, license "defense" attorneys, pay "judges", build jails, contract jails to private entities, employ and pay "wardens", employ and pay guards, employ and pay "parole officers" -- all with stolen resources and under penalty of contingent death for those who dare defend themselves against state agents' criminal aggression. Good work if you can get it. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 7 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    "Giuliani said the insertion of race into the [Garner] case is unwarranted and that a white man breaking the law would have seen the same result." Quite true, but ah...that's the point, Mr Mayor. In the end, defy the state, and you're liable to die, whatever race you happen to be, (although some get smacked down a little  harder than others it seems). Government isn't justice, reason, or kindly. It is ultimately force.
  • tomcat's picture
    tomcat 7 weeks 5 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Thailand is just another example that a majority decision is not the ultima ratio of wisdom and moral. A Majority of poor ricefarmers and other have-nots engaged in some sort of cargo cult and tried to vote themselves the treasure. Nothing said about the ousted shinawatra clan and the rice scheme. No word about who really started using deadly violence in riots of 2010 and 2013. I am living here for several years now.With or without an elected government: Thailand doesnt work like any western state and thats a good thing. Don't cheat, don't steal, don't get violent, don't insult the king. Apart from that, do as you please. The State leaves you very much alone. Little to no buerocracy, so much more freedom in everyday life.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 7 weeks 6 days ago Web link KenK
    Thanks, dhowlander. Sometimes makes us feel like proverbial voices in the wilderness -- with no echo. :-) Sam
  • tomcat's picture
    tomcat 7 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    The aging Germany and shortage of skilled workers: There are several lobbyist groups that push for more immigration: The parts of the administration that handle welfare as well as big charitable organisations like Charitas and Arwo who are in the same business. Its about state funding, the annual distribution of taxmoney. The more "clients" they have, the bigger parts of the cake they can claim, the better for them. And then there are the Employers, the big corporations with their constant complaints about the acute shortage of skilled labour. Acute Shortage meets high demand, now you might expect an abundance of well paid jobs. In this case you expect to much, at least for the last 10 to 15 years. Here its only to create an even greater oversupply of potential (skilled or unskilled)workers on the labour market. Anyway these are not the 1960ies anymore, what young Person with a university degree is supposed to come to Germany to "work for food and housing"? Instead many of the People that really do come are rather a burden for the existing society, except for the aforementioned lobbyist groups.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 weeks 20 hours ago Web link Government Deni...
    Should I, an anarchist, be "outraged" -- "shocked" -- at this news? I say no! In fact, I'm happy to see published reports -- even if mostly at "alternative news" sites -- outlining the nature of the beast. Because this not something new. It has been covertly and overtly the political "plank" for hundreds and hundreds of years, since the first khans conquered the first settlements and tribes and caravans and set up the precursors of what we know as the state(<==PDF). And I know the "system" can't be fixed, or improved upon. Leviathan can and will only become larger and larger and more and more coercive and abusive -- as long as there are dupes to aggrandize his machinations -- until a critical mass of current mini-statists become anarchists and pull each and every senator and representative claiming to represent "him." off their pedestals. Everywhere. Across and around the entirety of the globe. Until the psychopaths calling themselves "state" present one of their bread-and-circus events ("elections") and nobody -- nobody -- registers to "vote". Or perhaps only 1% or 2% of "eligibles", (who will represent mainly government employees after the implosion occurs) will "...get out the vote...". A fun time to be alive, Mates! But please, abstain from beans. Sam