Recent comments

  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 3 hours 27 min ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Not everyone is adversely affected by vaccines. But lots of people are being adversely affected by them nowadays, now that Congress has eliminated liability for manufacturers, doctors, and those ordering them, and the vaccine schedule subsequently exploded (in the 1990s and beyond). The current generation of kids is much sicker than prior ones, with high rates of autism, ADHD, allergies, seizures, learning disabilities, and autoimmune disease. Military members have been hard-hit by vaccines (think Gulf War syndrome) and adults are also being harmed. The flu shot has generated the most claims in vaccine court and sometimes it causes death, paralysis. It is a good idea to leave the government schools, for a variety of reasons, but the vaccine mafia is making it extremely difficult to escape its dictates nowadays. In California, kids can no longer even go to PRIVATE schools if they have not taken the shots "recommended" by the CDC. Day care workers must do likewise in CA. Hospital workers are losing their jobs if they refuse their annual flu shots (there is a provision in Obamacare whereby hospitals lose Medicare funding if they don't maintain sufficiently high flu "compliance" rates). There is a bill in Congress now to bring CA-type laws to the whole country. University students are now being required to take various shots. That is why we are hearing about mumps outbreaks on campuses early on in the school year. Mothers giving birth in hospitals who refuse the Hep B shot for their newborn are being threatened that the hospital will bring in CPS; this happens on a regular basis. Mind you that Hep B is a condition that only the sexually active and drug users are susceptible to (and children of mothers who have the virus, which can be tested for). The U.S. is one of the only countries in the world that does this. So the bottom line is, if we do not stand up against this tyranny, we can all look forward to being vaccinated from womb to tomb.  
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 19 hours 22 min ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Well, that IS the function of government. The real question is whether it is good or not.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 20 hours 3 min ago Page Paul Bonneau
    I do not subscribe to the government vaccine program, but I never experienced anything adverse about it. I suspect the people getting grief over it are those using half measures. That is, they protect their kids from vaccines, but still send them to the government indoctrination centers. The schools do not belong to "the people" (whatever that means); they belong to the government. People should not be surprised at what happens there, nor does it make sense to complain about it. Just leave; that is the answer.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 20 hours 9 min ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Douglas, I watched that video. What I didn't see was effective behavior. If anything, this sort of thing creates more Trump supporters. Even provocateurs must understand this can't work. Who would take them seriously? But yeah, definitely assholes.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 day 3 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Social disapproval is, like practically everything, a double-edged sword. In earlier periods, it served the cause of liberty in certain instances, for example there was a period of time when taking welfare from the government was frowned upon and avoided, when possible. Likewise, having children out of wedlock was not approved of. Clearly, those days are gone. The most common and extreme form of social disapproval in vogue these days is directed at those who do not subscribe to the government vaccine program. Besides for the blatant nastiness unleashed toward these folks, this form of disapproval or shaming has gotten to the point that family members will sever relationships with one another, doctors will not accept their children in their practices,  and, politically, governments have become more brazen in removing exemptions to their ever-increasing mandates. While some libertarians might view this latter form of disapproval as an expression of civil society "policing its own", that would be a misreading of the situation.  It is not a grassroots phenomenon by any means. It has been manufactured by state propaganda, a compliant media, and corrupt research performed and sanctioned by government.  
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 3 days 23 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    BTW, Check out thses assholes over at Infowars. Talk about clueless SJWs ANGRY MOB SURROUNDS TRUMP SUPPORTER New Jersey Trump protesters spew the typical "racist," "sexist" talking points  SPECIAL REPORTS 2230 Comments
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 3 days 23 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Paul- If a SJW is under, say, 22-25, he  or she is probably suffering from a lack of important life experiences, remaining a narrowminded adolescent, victim of PC classrooms and part or the peer-pressured Selfie Generation.   Obviously MOST of these young SJWs have NEVER read any Thoreau, otherwise they wouldn't be such douches, nitwits and pampered pricks. White AND Black.   A lot of the SJWs caught on YouTube or Infowars street cams are acting out for their posses. And alas, some of them are just paid agents provocateurs. JMHO
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 days 2 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    It's not just assholery Paul, although they are assholes, but a part of a political scheme. Obama and Sen. Reid broadside against the NFL's Washington Redskins today shows how the SJW schtick works. Indians are a reliable Dem constituency and the Obama model is to get these groups all hopped up on SJW memes prior to the November election. Assholes focusing on the big plan.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 days 18 hours ago Web link Westernerd
    The nascent Islamic state in central Europe is emerging. If a state is an organized group that asserts the sole right to use violence to compel others, then the Austrian government now has a rival. The Austrian Islamist group makes this claim as well, along with the means and the will to act on that claim. Like the IRA in Ireland, the Basques in NW Spain, the Islamists of Austria are forming and running a shadow state inside Austria. This is how it begins.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 5 days 1 hour ago Web link A. Magnus
    This comment will stray away from homelessness, homeless camps and Ken's original comment; but will identify freedom and liberty. There might always be individuals (no matter how any of us fantasize how "we" might come up with a "free society"), people who will shun what we generally define as "responsibility". They will trespass, steal, murder, and do all kinds of evil deeds. But most of us won't most of the time. Kent posted some videos on his blog a couple years back that illustrates my point, and which have prompted me to think as I bike along each day through the city (and back when I was actively trucking -- hours on end): about freedom, liberty, and "authority". Two of the entries were videos about traffic in the London metro, and experiments those presumably in charge of things made in removing all traffic controls from very congested intersections: 1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBcz-Y8lqOg&feature=youtu.be 2) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vi0meiActlU Keep in mind those who produced the videos were NOT advocating the ending of political authority. I'm sure that would be unthinkable to them. They were, in fact, addressing the "global warming" issue. Here's another: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFOo3e0nxSI I've misfiled the one on which the guy who made the video was making dumb comments pertaining to his opinion that all this freedom was "absolutely insane", and constantly commented about "almost an accident" (that did not happen). Freedom is a fearsome meditation -- for many. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 5 days 2 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    I realized after I posted that it was somewhat out of line. "Nesters" have been around forever. And, "homesteaders" have been considered homeless folk (until they get their tater seeds in the ground -- and also comply with the white man's rules for satisfying the laws outlining homestead "rights"). Lots of range wars and cowboy and wagon train movies about homesteaders and nesters and "free-rangers", etc etc etc. A major barrier in the mental wrap-around is in the fact none of us has ever experienced total liberty and freedom. I've dreamed about it, tried to "theorize" it, but have never experienced it. I suspect that may also fit you. So, it seems to be generally accepted that whoever of the psychopaths have been victorious conquerors in their wars can then claim "jurisdiction" over a given piece of real estate (such as "North America" and/or "South America" -- and now, of course, all their various political divisions, boundaries and borders as we know them -- virtually all with histories of wars that have been decorated with various sacred names). Which then gives them the "right" to determine exactly who owns what. All "jurisdiction" proceeds from a loaded firearm. We can argue about "might-makes-right" 'till we're red in the face; but we can't alter history. Hopefully we will play a major part in changing it. Peacefully. With all central political "authority" finally scuttled. If you pay tribute ("tax") to somebody(s), you can't claim 100% ownership. And, although I agree with Mr. Davies that there will come a time (hopefully within my lifetime) when governments and states and the psychopathic groups of individuals who make them up will implode and disappear, I cannot accurately outline to you how real property will be divided up equitably. And, even then, I'm sure there will be "homeless" folks. Plenty of subject matter for topics. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 days 35 min ago Web link A. Magnus
    Yes there would Sam, it would only be a question of where these "jungles" would be located. If there were no Washington state or Seattle government entities, these homeless types would get rousted hard & have their possessions and shelters burnt by Pinkerton/Blackwater-type private security in the pay of the highway's owners. Instead they'll be nudged out by NGO social service contractors and the police. The political class wants to virtue signal how good they are and the NGO contractors are more than happy to take their money. This has all happend before by the way, too.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 days 1 hour ago Page floppytilleyhat
    David: "...Individually, they would never think to steal what's mine..." Correct. This entire interchange rests upon the debate between collectivism and individualism. Renunciate, I say. So does Jack Perry. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 days 1 hour ago Web link A. Magnus
    There would be no such thing as "homeless camps" if there were no such thing as government ("public" ha ha) property. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 days 2 hours ago
    Rich: A State of Mind
    Page Paul Hein
    I'm the wealthiest man in town. Partly because my wealth cannot be measured in fiat. Or "bitcoin". Or gold, for that matter. Although I'd trust gold sooner than any of the others -- simply due to my "faith" that most would recognize its value and swap me for sustenance, marbles or chalk for it. Or silver. All media of exchange require faith -- or superstition. An ongoing belief that those possessing sustenance I value will be willing to swap for specie or barter. That will be true even after all lunatics gathered under the brainless abstraction called "state" have been dissipated. Just because one is anarchist does not necessitate s/he refrain from believing some things s/he does not fully understand. Healthier than any other 81 year-old with whom I'm acquainted, I've been car-free since 2008. I have two top-of-the-line bikes, each set up for different purposes: one for pulling (I have 3 different cargo trailers); one for over-the-road transport. These are pedaling bikes -- not motorcycles. With merely the expense I circumvent for psychopath-mandated insurance, I can rent autos or aircraft several times per year. That rarely happens. I've developed a mindset and a lifestyle that gets me where I wish to go, when I wish to go there. That includes crossing fictitious lines in the sand ("borders") without bothering with the white man's "passports", "visas", et al. If I want to move to one of the parts of the earth they're calling "Mexico", "Chili" or "Costa Rico" I'll do so. But not because folks there are more "free" than I am. However, since my 26th grandchild and 6th great-grandchild are due this summer, I think I'll stay here near my family. And be free. Here. Now. Where I'm "at". Nice article, Paul. Sam
  • A. Magnus's picture
    A. Magnus 6 days 4 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    "It was for the best" in 1940s Germany too, and just as many suburban vermin were happy to look the other way while the weakest people in their society were 'put in their place.'    Considering how you didn't mention filing a police report about your alleged clothes iron incident, it's obvious you don't know who actually did it. All you have to prove your point is innuendo. However since demonizing the weak seems to be a part of your agenda, it is to be expected. 
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 days 4 hours ago
    Rich: A State of Mind
    Page Paul Hein
    This seems to call into question Bitcoin and other such currencies, because all they are is electrons in one place rather than another, something pretty ephemeral. It also seems to call into question any bank-issued scrip, even a bank that was not fractional reserve. Banks can go broke for other reasons. Money is a great invention, but being a device invented and implemented by humans, it is not ever going to be perfect. There are just better and worse candidates for money. One naturally prefers a kind that does not have the side effect of enriching scum.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 days 5 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    It's all well and good to have an aim or desire to shrink government; but if you accept more than was stolen from you, then you are just another parasite, and an accomplice in the robbing of others. That ain't NAP. "I object that you are stealing from people; but if you want to give me some of the loot, I'll take all you are willing to shovel out." The latter kinda calls into question the initial objection, doesn't it?
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 days 5 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    Yeah, but they tend to wander out onto the highway a lot, and so, creepy headline notwithstanding, it's probably for the best. They often get high, drunk, or lost in their own delusional notions and throw things at passing cars too. Had a clothes iron bust the window on my truck on the I-5 in Renton one time.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 days 5 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    All these points are true, but irrelevant. It is a simple matter of defining theft. If the money is yielded involuntarily, it is theft (extortion, to be precise). If some other amount is given voluntarily, it is not. It doesn't matter what a given victim's view of legitimacy or anything else is. If a person puts out his hand and says he needs money for an operation for his mother, and you put a $50 bill in it, then he pulls out a gun and tells you to just hand your wallet over, you have suffered a theft. Your initial willing handing over of $50 does not negate that claim.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 6 days 22 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Jim nails it: "Incidentally my reason for agreeing that it's morally okay to accept proffered government handouts is simple: to a very minor degree, it helps reduce the resources government has, and therefore marginally curtails its ability to wreak further mayhem and advances the day of its collapse. "Accepting" them, however, by no means implies that it's morally okay to call for more, or for a continuation of the offer. Thus for example one can in good conscience use a government road, while calling loudly for its road monopoly to end."
  • floppytilleyhat's picture
    floppytilleyhat 1 week 2 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    "I have some problems with this. First, is any statist given the ability to specify how much should "properly" be extorted from people? If he thinks 10% of his income is OK, and they take 50%, then the extra 40% is yielded unwillingly, and it is still theft. I don't think you can plausibly say only anarchists can suffer from theft."   This reminds me of a joke: A man said to a woman, "Would you have sex with me for one hundred million dollars?"   "Of course!", the woman exclaimed.   The man then asked, "Would you have sex with me for fifty dollars?"   "What do you think I am, a whore?", she huffed.   "My dear, we've already established that. Now we're just negotiating a price."   Anyway, I get your point, but I think you give non-ancaps too much credit. Take the case of minarchists. How many of them regard government over their prescribed limit as criminal? You may hear them use words like "excessive," "confiscatory," "predatory," or perhaps even "criminal." But how often do they mean it in the same sense they apply to a street thug?   They use hyperbolic language to object because they're paying for more than they want. But they see the state as a necessity. They believe that they truly owe some portion of their money to it. And because of its necessity, they believe that the state properly sets the amount owed. They may disagree with how much is spent, or how big the apparatus is, but they don't think of taxation itself as criminal. Not really.   In fact, I would argue that someone who sees the state as necessary must see it as legitimate, and that the necessity of the state implies that the rate of taxation is properly set by it.   -Dave
  • floppytilleyhat's picture
    floppytilleyhat 1 week 3 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    "Second, setting reification aside: it's one thing for the "rightful owner" to decide what dispensation might be of his own "property" -- but by doing so (docile, "voluntary compliance"), is s/he not also contributing to the harmful endorsement of theft of my property -- and everybody else's property?"   On the whole, I think not. It's tempting to believe that they're complicit in the stealing of my property. But really, what role do they have? Voter? Their votes are as worthless as mine (Behold: equality).   Individually, they would never think to steal what's mine. They have all sorts of things they'd like the state to spend money on. But really, how many regular citizens ever propose a raise in taxes? Not many. If they did propose it, would it be more than hot air? What specific criminal actions do they do?   The legislators ratify and publish threats styles as law, and the cops follow through on the threats. In my view, those are the people who commit criminal actions.   -Dave
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 1 week 4 hours ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Heh.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 1 week 6 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Nice article. A fresh and well stated argument.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 7 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Welcome, David, it's a pleasure to read such a brain-stretcher here.   I agree with your conclusion, and on this occasion (though not always) with Walter Block; but wonder whether the way you reach it is quite correct. You seem to base it on the assertion that "rightful owner of that property is the one who decides how it is valued and under what conditions it is justly transferred." As you later admit, that is "subjective."   Surely rather, the rightful owner of property is the one who exchanged his labor for it; and that is an entirely objective standard. Objectively, he has the right of self-ownership; even though he might foolishly and erroneously regard himself as a slave (he supposes that someone else owns his labor) he does, regardless, actually own it himself. And therefore, any property for which he exchanges it.   Accordingly, all taxation is always theft, even though a majority may have been fooled into thinking they owe their souls to the government store and, so, raise no objection. Is that not the very essence of any con trick?   Congratulations though on the brilliant insight that "... the point where he sees his taxation as intrinsically criminal is exactly the point he becomes an anarchist." Precisely; the change or conversion is one of perception, rather than one of fact and reality.   Incidentally my reason for agreeing that it's morally okay to accept proffered government handouts is simple: to a very minor degree, it helps reduce the resources government has, and therefore marginally curtails its ability to wreak further mayhem and advances the day of its collapse. "Accepting" them, however, by no means implies that it's morally okay to call for more, or for a continuation of the offer. Thus for example one can in good conscience use a government road, while calling loudly for its road monopoly to end.      
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 20 hours ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Normally, if a person "A" steals money from you, and you get your gun, go out and get it back from him, it would be regarded as a just action by most reasonable people. On the other hand, if A steals money from B, you are not justly entitled to it. B is. What A's normal occupation is, should not come into the picture at all, whether he is barkeep, sales clerk - or a tax collector. If A steals from a series of people including you, then willingly offers you a cut (rather than your having to risk life and limb to get it back on your own), there is no shame in taking it - provided he is offering no more than he took from you in the first place, and (for the sake of your self-respect) you do not imagine he is doing you a favor. He certainly is not, on net, even if he does not require you to jump through degrading hoops to get it, which is the usual case. If he does require it, he is just stealing more of your time and your life. "Only an anarchist can assert that the taxing of his property is an act of robbery. After all, the point where he sees his taxation as intrinsically criminal is exactly the point he becomes an anarchist." I have some problems with this. First, is any statist given the ability to specify how much should "properly" be extorted from people? If he thinks 10% of his income is OK, and they take 50%, then the extra 40% is yielded unwillingly, and it is still theft. I don't think you can plausibly say only anarchists can suffer from theft. There was some helicopter money being handed out some years back as a way to supposedly stimulate the economy, and I was in a bit of a quandary about whether to accept it (it in no way approached the amount extorted from us). However there was a little-publicized upper limit, and our income was above that limit, so we didn't get any of it anyway, thus solving that problem. I generally treat taxes the same as money stolen by an ordinary criminal - not worth the effort to get it back. That is a fool's game, a waste of my time. It's just gone. Better to focus your efforts on positioning yourself not to have it stolen in the first place. Don't make much, then you won't be attracting thieves. Or earn it on the black market; etc.
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 1 week 21 hours ago Page Douglas Herman
    Paul-  Rob wrote me and said "get the popcorn ready." I'd have to agree, unless HC or DT are suddenly off the ticket.  Then comes the crying when WeThe People are stuck for 4-8 years with "our" choice.
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 1 week 21 hours ago Page Douglas Herman
    Thanks Mark & Paul for your compliments. I try to channel my inner Henry in such matter:  WWHD. And it helps to have an easy target like Kate Schulz, author of such books as "Being Wrong."   "If you want to feel better about not being perfect and see the potential upside in your errors, read Being Wrong by Kathryn Schulz ... a brilliant book with a sweeping grasp of philosophy and physics and all points in between." —President Bill Clinton
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 1 day ago Page floppytilleyhat
    If you will bear with me putting a lengthy addendum to my comment, yesterday I received an email from an old army buddy with a long forwarded diatribe against "Obamacare" and its presumed (and very likely) destruction of medical care for those over 76 "...secrets you didn't know about Obamacare's effects upon Medicare..." The idea is that I'm supposed to forward it to 10 people who will forward it to 10 people, and (using math mentality) soon "...everybody will know, and will be free!" (Abe is an ultra right-winger and retired educator) Here's my reply to my friend, Abe: Hey Abe! Nice to hear from you! I was just wondering this morning if I otta send you an email to see how you're getting along. I follow a principle: never, never, ever expect reason, truth, "justice" (more commonly, just-us) sanity or logic to emanate from any group of psychopaths hiding under that brainless abstraction lovingly called "government". Never. Ever. If I do, I shall lead a life of fury and frustration. I have no "rights". I have no "representatives". I make choices. The challenge of anarchy is in developing methods to circumnavigate and sidestep the many lunatics who will gleefully attempt to interfere with the choices I make. If it's going to be, it'll be up to me. I've never used "Medicare", and will never use it. I pay cash (well, federal reserve notes) to a physician I trust -- who is also my girl friend. Then ignore everything she tells me :-). The thieves from whom I steal a few hundred bucks every month always turn around and steal close to a hundred back from me for the "service" (ha ha) they call "Medicare". My thievery from them is what they like me to think of as "Social Security" -- and that I'm not actually stealing it, but am "entitled" to it. Balderdash. Antisocial Insecurity would be truth-telling. I ran across this little 5 minute video this morning while researching another matter. It was truthful, But at the end the producer(s) tried to convince listeners that there is something they can DO about it. Nada. The problem outlined in your email to me amounts to nothing more than the "red line" my friend Dan Sanchez discusses in this 20 minute video. It will not be rectified, sorry to announce. The red line might be moved, but the issue will remain. Abstain from beans is my best advice. More and more individuals are coming to see the fidelity of that idea. A small step, but it is a step. Regards, Sam Spade Mark warned me several years ago that I tend to come on too strong to those merely trying to get their feet wet in liberty, and he's no doubt correct. There are times I simply can't restrain meself :-[ . Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 1 day ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Glad to see you, Dave, posting an essay and posing a controversial quandary. Hope you keep posting. If there is one thing we need, it's new blood and new ideas and more topics of interest. You look to be one capable of contributing some good, spicy stuff! However, this is one reason I reject "libertarian theory". Mama taught me some eons back how to determine "may" from "can": "May" a libertarian (please note lower-case "l") take "money" (however that is defined in an era of generally accepted fiat) from those individuals who hide under that mindless abstraction called "government"? Let's turn that around: Isn't that what the state is all about? Redistribution of wealth??? I'm referring to those psychopaths -- so skillful at hiding theft (or outright robbery) under a euphemism called "tax". As I understand the system, that's the nature of all psychopathic systems called "government". They want "us" to "receive-our-fair-share" So, we may, and we can. It's fundamental. If the question is, "...should we depend upon the psychopathic largess of employees of government?..." I'd say, "no. For your own good, my suggestion is NO!" But back to your essay: "...the rightful owner of that property is the one who decides how it is valued and under what conditions it is justly transferred. So if the owner of wealth believes that government is owed his property, and the government is of the same mind, then in what sense is this taxation theft?..." First, in order to put this into proper non-statist perspective, it is important to understand and accept that "the government" does not exist, nor does "it" have a mind. That's the purveyance of the psychopaths I linked above. Second, setting reification aside: it's one thing for the "rightful owner" to decide what dispensation might be of his own "property" -- but by doing so (docile, "voluntary compliance"), is s/he not also contributing to the harmful endorsement of theft of my property -- and everybody else's property? Let's not forget the "...fair share..." obfuscation. Now, I'm not in fact totally disagreeing with my friend, Mark's comment above. If you can't steal from robbers, who the hell can you steal from, I say. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 1 day ago Page Retta Fontana
    (From Retta's essay): "...I find it an outrage..." Why? I enjoyed Jeff Tucker's take on the efficacy of monopoly government: "...So long as there is government, the only real way to make the economy and society function properly is for government to be corrupt. The best form of government is no government. The second best form of government is corrupt government. But the absolutely worst form of government is that which pretends to be clean and good. That form of government does the most damage of any..." Jeff was paying tribute to an individual -- a former District of Collectivism..., er, Columbia, mayor, Marion Barry -- upon news of his death. You can read the article here: https://tucker.liberty.me/in-praise-of-political-corruption-marion-barry... Sam
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 week 1 day ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Well said. The more money put back into the hands of the people the state took it from, the better off we all are.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 1 week 1 day ago Page Retta Fontana
    A good book for history and context.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 1 week 1 day ago Page Retta Fontana
    Paul, Glock27, et al. My take: A few good guns and lots and lots of ammo, spare parts, slings, etc. Like my favorite ATF agent once told me: "An AR-15 without ammo is just a club." True dat. Plan accordingly.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 1 week 1 day ago Web link strike
    Yikes! I didn't think I could even be anymore cynical about those rat bastards too. Good pick, Strike.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 1 day ago Web link KenK
    Then there is that old classic from The Onion: http://www.theonion.com/video/diebold-accidentally-leaks-results-of-2008...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 1 day ago Page Retta Fontana
    Well, ammo properly stored (in a cool dry place) lasts a very long time. Just google around for it. Lots of people claim to be shooting ammo from WWII with no problem, and some shoot ammo from the 1930's, which is as long as "smokeless" powder has been available. As to buying guns, your relatives, friends and neighbors may have no use for them at present, but that could always change too. Anyway it was just a suggestion!
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 1 week 3 days ago Page Retta Fontana
    Paul; just a quick note on "Just buy more guns and ammo..." Ammunition is somewhat fragil in that the powder and iginitor will gradually deterioate over time. It is one of my apprehensions with the ammunition I have collected. I have gone to reloading. As for buying more guns there is but one person in my household who can operate a firearm and that is me, so buying more does not help me.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Retta Fontana
    I suggest reading James Scott's book, "The Art of Not Being Governed" for more perspective about government enslavement and the peoples' response (to evade it) over the ages. In the meantime just buy more guns and ammo, might come in handy some day and it gives peace of mind. Also, google "destroyed gatsos" for some entertainment.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 4 days ago Page Retta Fontana
    A great one, Retta!  Vermont just became the 4th tax farm (with Oregon, Commiefornia, and W. Virginia) to implement automatic voter registration via the DMV.  I'm trying to collect some more info from the bureau-rats, then new STRticle forthcoming...  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Never too late, Paul!  :-)  Hess was middle-aged when he started -- then started a business after that.  Life is no rehearsal.  Gotta go for it!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Sam, your thoughts are always a pleasure to read.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Douglas Herman
    This is tailor-made for a Mencken comment: "Here (in America) the daily panorama of human existence, of private and communal folly, the unending procession of governmental extortions and chicaneries, of commercial brigandages and throat slittings, of theological buffoneeries, of aesthetic ribaldries, of legal swindles and harlotries, of miscellaneous rogueries, villanies, imbecilities, grotesqueries, and extravagances is so inordinately gross and preposterous, so perfectly brought up to the highest conceivable amperage, so steadily enriched with an almost fabulous daring and originality, that only a person born with a petrified diaphram can fail to laugh himself to sleep every night and wake up with all the eager, unflagging expectation of a Sunday-School superintendent touring the Paris peep-shows." I know you like Trump for SNL, but don't overlook the potential of a Clinton presidency. Just think of Bill as First Man. The thought takes one's breath away. No intern will be safe. This is the best presidential campaign ever. It's made even better since I don't care which side wins. Too bad it looks like Trump will have enough delegates for first vote (unless I missed something). A busted R convention was getting me drooling, but sadly that is not to be. The tax thing is adding some fun though.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Good one. It is one of my regrets that I never took it up. I can do other trades, electrical, plumbing, even built a house, but not being a welder is a definite loss. Now too old to try any more, oh well!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Douglas Herman
    "And yet, rather than hold any of these living war criminals to blame, mainstream columnists attack a 19th Century New England naturalist." A good thing, too. It would be worrisome if such a collection of lowlifes actually appreciated Thoreau. I'd have to start questioning Thoreau!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Note: the title implies there will be follow-ups. That was the original plan but it turned out differently; part 1 is the only part there will be.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 6 days ago Page Kevin M. Patten
    Understood. Editing can be helped, though, by presenting graphics that will more easily fit; any processor will do that, eg FS Resizer.   I've reduced your dozen to a width of 400 pixels or less, in case you want to re-submit them. They are at http://www.theanarchistalternative.info/kevins/ - follow that URL with kp1b.jpg, kp2b.jpg etc. All are .jpg except kp12b.png
  • Kevin M. Patten's picture
    Kevin M. Patten 2 weeks 1 day ago Page Kevin M. Patten
    Yes, it comes up fine on my computer, Jim. Although I didn't think the pictures would turn out that big. I dont have any control over the editing and/or formatting. Apologies. 
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 2 weeks 1 day ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Musk's real genius has always been finding ways to tap into government largesse.