The Ballad of Cullen Mutrie

Column by Alex R. Knight III.

Exclusive to STR

It’s made national news by now, and so the information I’m getting is from the Washington Post: Apparently, around 6 p.m. on April 12th, members of the New Hampshire Drug Task Force went to serve a search warrant on Cullen Mutrie of Greenland. They were ostensibly searching for steroids, and if they found any in Mutrie’s home, presumably planned to arrest him (and quite likely his live-in girlfriend), put him (them) in a cage somewhere, and file felony charges. But things didn’t quite turn out like that.
 
When they arrived at Mutrie’s home, they were met with armed resistance. As a result of several fired shots, the chief of Greenfield Police Department, Michael Maloney – a bureaucrat with about a week to go until retirement – was killed. Four other cops were wounded, two of them seriously. Of course, the government’s armed enforcers went predictably berserk: At least four other local police departments responded to the original raid team’s frantic cries for help, along with a New Hampshire State Police SWAT team -- and even the FBI – all toting assault rifles. Attempts were made to speak with Mutrie, but he soon went silent. Meanwhile, elsewhere, traffic was being re-routed as far away as I-95, and some government agency or other actually brought a military-style Bearcat armored vehicle to the scene. Around 2 a.m., some cops pitched a small robot vehicle mounted with a camera through one of Multrie’s windows, trying to get a glance at what was going on inside the house. What the robot caught on video were the dead bodies of Mutrie and his girlfriend. The police and medical examiner later confirmed that both had died of gunshot wounds. At the time of this writing, it’s unclear whether their deaths came as the result of a double-suicide or a murder-suicide – according to bureaucrats, that is. I suspect there remains more than just the ghost of a chance that return fire on the part of the original cops may have had some role to play. Time will tell.
 
From all accounts, Cullen Mutrie was no angel. From the seven years he lived in Greenland, neighbors tell a tale of a noisy, argumentative person who routinely got into shouting matches with his girlfriend in the wee hours, often outside for all the rest of the wanting-to-sleep residents to hear. He was once arrested on domestic assault charges – although apparently never convicted. And he also had a history of steroid use. Steroids, if used regularly and in high enough doses, can lead to “’roid rage” – or, a chemically induced state of violent anger. This may explain Mutrie’s decision to defend himself with such uncompromising zeal. Then again, it might not. In fact, it might’ve just been that, like Carl Drega before him, Mutrie had just simply had enough.
 
This we will never know – Mutrie (and perhaps his girlfriend) – took that knowledge to their graves. But this much we can and do know: The cops who sought to invade Mutrie’s home, confiscate his property, kidnap him, cage him, and then attempt to have him kept in a cage for a much longer time – only to one day depart with indelible blemishes on his record that would affect his ability to stay gainfully employed, among other things, for the rest of his days – did so, and wished to continue doing so, all with money taken from the general public collectively under an equal threat of violence. In other words, try not paying taxes to finance such obscene shenanigans, and see if you don’t eventually end up in much the same situation as Mutrie did. 
 
Further, there’s this: I never knew Mutrie – probably you never did either. Maybe the guy was a total jerk, maybe not. I don’t know, and never will. But I do know that even if he was an argumentative SOB who loved to take and sell steroids or whatever else, he didn’t deserve to have happen to him what I just described above. And he most certainly didn’t deserve to have it done to him at our forcefully extracted expense. Had he simply been left alone, three people would now still be alive, four others would never have had to visit the hospital, and a whole lot of our money wouldn’t have been wasted down the government rathole. 
 
But don’t expect anyone in government to learn a single thing from this. Not here in Amerika – an Amerika now spelled with a big fat K. An Amerika that contains 5% of the world’s population but 25% of its incarcerated prisoners. Twenty-five percent of the world’s caged people! A 25% that government was about to make Cullen Mutrie a part of. The War on Drugs will continue unabated – perhaps even intensify. Hysterical screams for more gun control laws will ring out from Concord, and probably in Washington, D.C. as well. In fact, I would say the legislative move in New Hampshire to adopt Vermont-style licenseless concealed carry provisions is now probably dead in the water for any foreseeable future. If the cops were crying foul before on that – and they most certainly were – now they’ll be howling holy hell. And just feast your eyes on these so disgustingly sentimental quotes from various sucking-at-the-public-trough bureaucrats, courtesy once again of the Washington Post:
 
NH Attorney General Michael Delaney, speaking of Greenland PD chief Michael Maloney: “In those final days, he sacrificed his life in public service as a law enforcement officer in New Hampshire.” 
 
“Public service,” yet. Kind of reminds me (especially this time of year, now that I think of it) of the Internal Revenue “Service.” In fact, it’s all based on the same set of lies and twisted principles. It’s sickening.
 
More still from Delaney: “The law enforcement community in New Hampshire is certainly grieving this morning, but they have come together — federal, state and local agencies — to do the job that law enforcement officers do every day, secure the safety and protection of our citizens.”
 
Unreal. Not only that this robotic zombie regards we “citizens” (which we are not, as Marc Stevens so cogently points out in his book, Adventures in Legal Land) as the property of the government, as if we were mere cattle, but also has the blistering temerity to state that the cops, in assaulting and caging us at our own forced expense are securing our “safety” and “protection.” Mutrie, for all his probable faults, was a paragon of rationality compared to this distorted dementia. And so it always and ever will go, with the disastrous disease known as government, until it is gone forever, at least.
 
But as for Mutrie himself, we might do well to remember John Stark’s quote from 1809: “Live Free or Die.” It’s still the New Hampshire motto, although it should appear obvious by now that it is just that: a quaint saying, an anachronism from another time obscenely touted by government – the very institution that makes a mockery of it in everything it does. 

And again, we’ll never know for sure, but it might’ve just been that Cullen Mutrie still thought it meant something. 

10
Your rating: None Average: 10 (5 votes)
Alex R. Knight III's picture
Columns on STR: 111

Alex R. Knight III is the author of numerous horror, science-fiction, and fantasy tales, including Tales from Dark 7.  He has also written and published poetry; non-fiction articles, reviews, and essays for a variety of venues; and is former Communications Director for the Libertarian Party of New Hampshire.  In 1998, he was awarded Activist of the Year for that organization.  He now lives and writes in rural southern Vermont where he holds a B.A. in Literature & Writing from Union Institute & University, and looks forward to living in a governmentless society of liberty.

Comments

Jim Davies's picture

Super job, Alex!

Suverans2's picture

"Unreal. Not only that this robotic zombie regards we “citizens” (which we are not, as Marc Stevens so cogently points out in his book, Adventures in Legal Land) as the property of the government, as if we were mere cattle..." ~ Alex R. Knight III

    Citizen. ..."Citizens" are members of a political community who, in their associated capacity, have...submitted themselves to the dominion* of a government... Black's Law Dictionary, Sixth Edition (c.1991), page 244

* Dominion is defined, in that same dictionary, as "perfect control in right of ownership". From this we can see that if you consent to be, or remain, "a member of a political community who, in their associated capacity, have...submitted themselves to the dominion of a government", you are, essentially, their "cattle", i.e. their "human resources".

    Qui tacet consentire videtur. He who is silent appears to consent. Jenk. Cent. 32.
    TAC'IT, a. [L. tacitus, from taceo, to be silent, that is, to stop, or to close. See Tack.] Silent; implied, but not expressed. Tacit consent is consent by silence, or not interposing an objection. So we say, a tacit agreement or covenant of men to live under a particular government, when no objection or opposition is made; a tacit surrender of a part of our natural rights...&c. ~ Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language

For the record, I do not voluntarily consent to live "under' your 'particular government", or to "surrender' any part of my 'natural rights"; and Notice to the Agent is Notice to the Principal.

    Actus me invito factus, non est meus actus. An act done by me against my will, [either vi et armis or vi coactus] is not my act.
KenK's picture

He "lived free" then he died. Just like Carl Drega.

Suverans2's picture

But, then, I may just have Drapetomania. ;)

Paul's picture

"In fact, I would say the legislative move in New Hampshire to adopt Vermont-style licenseless concealed carry provisions is now probably dead in the water for any foreseeable future."

Eh, maybe not. Cops may be befouling themselves in anger, but the rest of us have become pretty inured. Some might even be cheering. ;-)

The way it looks to me, Mutrie, even if a disagreeable person, has redeemed himself. It's the outsiders who stop tyranny, not the conformists.

richyankee's picture

"In fact, I would say the legislative move in New Hampshire to adopt Vermont-style licenseless concealed carry provisions is now probably dead in the water for any foreseeable future."

Well, that is what the cops would like to have accomplished, among other things. I would venture a guess that there is a large number of people who will not come to heel, and that acts like this murderous assault are as likely to convince more to that position. That is not what those who would be master want to accomplish.

A few (more than a few) years ago, the Hudson police shot a man in his bed during a 'drug raid' (wife and children present at the time). They managed to come up with a remnant of one joint (a roach). In their proud tradition of protecting people from heinous druglords, they forgot that they could have walked up to him in broad daylight, in public and invited him (with force if necessary) to visit them at the police station while they searched hi vast drug empire (provided they could get a warrant - which they had, if I remember correctly).

The question is (and this has been asked a thousand times - for example when the Branch Davidian compound was torched in favor of asking Koresh in for a hearing, which he, according to his history, would have enjoyed) - why kill, mame and inflame when a simple and civilly conducted arrest or invitation would accomplish the goal of securing the person for a legal hearing?

And, by the way, why do judges get a free pass on issuing these daft and idiotic warrants?

Maybe they haven't finished 'teaching' us a lesson yet.

The kids used to call them pigs. I get it.

Incidentally, I would pay to see them befouling themselves, preferably in public.

Paul's picture

"why kill, mame and inflame when a simple and civilly conducted arrest or invitation would accomplish the goal of securing the person for a legal hearing?"

Well, Waco was long planned by ATF as a flashy venture to impress Congress before a bill extending their funding came up. An ordinary quiet arrest and trial would have been no help to them with that.

"And, by the way, why do judges get a free pass on issuing these daft and idiotic warrants?"

Because they face no disincentives. And power corrupts, etc.

All of this is no surprise to anyone with an understanding of human nature. People work in their own interests (with few scruples about it, too), not for "the common good" despite what the propaganda says.